SN 11.22 Dubbaṇṇiya Sutta. Ugly.

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SN 11.22 Dubbaṇṇiya Sutta. Ugly.

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Jun 03, 2016 11:29 am

SN 11.22 Dubbaṇṇiya Sutta. Ugly.
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi.


https://suttacentral.net/en/sn11.22

At Savatthī in Jeta’s Grove. There the Blessed One said this: “Bhikkhus, once in the past a certain ugly deformed yakkha sat down on the seat of Sakka, lord of the devas. [658] Thereupon the Tavatiṃsa devas found fault with this, grumbled, and complained about it, saying: ‘It is wonderful indeed, sir! It is amazing indeed, sir! This ugly deformed yakkha has sat down on the seat of Sakka, lord of the devas!’ But to whatever extent the Tavatiṃsa devas found fault with this, grumbled, and complained about it, to the same extent that yakkha became more and more handsome, more and more comely, more and more graceful.

“Then, bhikkhus, the Tavatiṃsa devas approached Sakka and said to him: ‘Here, dear sir, an ugly deformed yakkha has sat down on your seat…. But to whatever extent the devas found fault with this … that yakkha became more and more handsome, more and more comely, more and more graceful.’—‘That must be the anger-eating yakkha.’

“Then, bhikkhus, Sakka, lord of the devas, approached that anger-eating yakkha. [659] Having approached, he arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, knelt down with his right knee on the ground, and, raising his joined hands in reverential salutation towards that yakkha, he announced his name three times: ‘I, dear sir, am Sakka, lord of the devas! I, dear sir, am Sakka, lord of the devas!’ To whatever extent Sakka announced his name, to the same extent that yakkha became uglier and uglier and more and more deformed until he disappeared right there.

“Then, bhikkhus, having sat down on his own seat, instructing the Tavatiṃsa devas, Sakka, lord of the devas, on that occasion recited these verses:
  • “‘I am not one afflicted in mind,
    Nor easily drawn by anger’s whirl.
    I never become angry for long,
    Nor does anger persist in me. [660]

    “‘When I’m angry I don’t speak harshly
    And I don’t praise my virtues.
    I keep myself well restrained
    Out of regard for my own good.’” [661]
Notes

[658] Spk: He was a dwarf the colour of a burnt stump and with a pot belly. He sat down on Sakka’s Yellowstone Throne (paṇḍukambalasilā; see Dhp-a I273,9-12; BL 1:320). It is said that he was actually a brahmā from the form realm. Having heard about Sakka’s patience, he came in order to test him; for it is impossible for any malevolent spirit (avaruddhaka-yakkha) to infiltrate a place so well guarded.

[659] Spk: Sakka had heard from the devas: “It is impossible to make that yakkha budge by harsh means, but if one assumes a humble manner and remains firm in patience, one can get him to leave.” Thus he adopted this tactic.

[660] Spk states that su, in pāda a, is a mere indeclinable (nipātamattaṃ), and thus we should resolve the compound: su upahatacitto ’mhi. Spk-pṭ: Sakka speaks of his own nature thus, ʺBecause of the presence in me of patience, love, and sympathy, I am not afflicted in mind against others.”
Pāda b is read in Be and Se as nāvattena suvānayo (Ee1: nāvaṭṭena suvānayo; Ee2: n’ āvaṭṭe na suvānayo). Spk: He states: “I am not easily drawn by anger’s whirl; I am not easily brought under the control of anger.” Pādas cd allude to the seventh of Sakka’s vows (see SN 11.11). Spk explains that vo in pāda c is an indeclinable. Suvānayo is also at v. 507b, where lust (rāga) rather than anger is the lure:
SN 4.25
“The Arahant, the Fortunate One in the world,
Is not easily drawn by means of lust.
He has gone beyond Mara’s realm:
Therefore I sorrow so bitterly.”


661 I read pādas ab with Be and Ee1 & 2 : Kuddhāhaṃ na pharusaṃ brūmi/Na ca dhammāni kittaye. Se omits the na in pāda a, apparently out of concern for the metre, but the metre can be preserved with na if we assume resolution of the fourth syllable. Neither Spk nor Spk-pṭ offers any help with the meaning. VĀT proposes, “And I do not speak on Dhamma matters,” but at Ja V 172,23 and 221,27 we find satañ ca dhammāni sukittitāni, “the well-proclaimed qualities of the good,” which suggests that here too the rare neuter plural dhammāni refers to personal virtues, not to spiritual teachings.

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Re: SN 11.22 Dubbaṇṇiya Sutta. Ugly.

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Jun 03, 2016 11:34 am

Samyukta Āgama SA 2.36
A Yakkha on Sakka’s Throne

[Chinese Parallel]

https://suttacentral.net/en/sa-2.36

Thus have I heard, once, the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time the World-honored One told the monks: “There was once a yakkha, who was short in stature, whose face was ugly, and whose complexion was black. People did not like the sight of him. This yakkha once seated himself on Sakka’s seat. When the thirty-three gods saw the yakkha sitting in Sakka’s place, they all became very angry, and insulted him in various ways. Then, the ugly aspects of the yakkha slowly diminished, he became attractive and grew taller. The gods abused and cursed him and became more and more angry. The yakkha in turn grew even taller and more beautiful. The gods went to Sakka and told him: “There is a yakkha, extremely ugly and short, who sits in your place. We, the gods, abused him severely, and the yakkha’s form became beautiful, his body grew taller!” Sakka said: “There is this yakkha, who on receiving abuse turns beautiful, he is called ‘On the Side of Anger.’” Thereupon Sakka went to his seat, knelt with his cloth arranged over one shoulder, folded his hands, offered incense and spoke to the yakkha: “Great seer! I am Sakka. I am Sakka.” After Sakka had uttered his name thrice, the yakkha became small and ugly again and finally vanished. Sakka resumed his seat and said to the gods: “From now on, let none of you generate anger. If there is hostility, be careful not to add anger to it.” And he spoke this verse:
  • “If someone comes and utters insults, /
    ​let no one return these insults to him.
    Towards those who come to attack and to harm, /
    ​let everyone generate loving-kindness.

    Those without anger, without violence, /
    ​one should always befriend.
    For they are noble ones, /
    ​they are disciples of noble ones.

    Those with anger and hatred /
    ​are blocked by that anger as if by a mountain.
    But if, when there is anger and hatred, /
    ​one can control oneself even a little,
    then this is called a wholesome state /
    ​like the taming of an unruly horse.’”
The Buddha told the monks: “Sakka is the king of gods, enjoying all kinds of pleasure. He can control his anger and praises those who control their anger. How much more should you, monks, who, out of faith have gone forth from home into homelessness, gone forth and pursued the way, you, who have shaved off hair and beard and donned the robes, how much more should you control anger and praise those who control their anger! In this way, monks, you should practice!”

The monks, having listened to what the Buddha had said, were happy and remembered it well.

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Re: SN 11.22 Dubbaṇṇiya Sutta. Ugly.

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Jun 03, 2016 11:37 am

The Anger Eating Demon as Told by Ajahn Brahm
http://www.allreadable.com/fad3An72

Ajahn Brahm's version differs in that the yakka gets more ugly as people get angry with him...

:anjali:
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