Wise Understanding of Dukkha

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
rowyourboat
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Re: Wise Understanding of Dukkha

Post by rowyourboat » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:14 pm

I think there is a big difference in looking for the TRUTH of suffering (understanding, insight based) as opposed to the EMOTION of suffering (mood, feeling). One leads to letting go, the other, perhaps worsening of the problem, perhaps understanding its roots.

with metta

RYB
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

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dhamma_spoon
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Re: Wise Understanding of Dukkha

Post by dhamma_spoon » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:16 pm

rowyourboat wrote:I think there is a big difference in looking for the TRUTH of suffering (understanding, insight based) as opposed to the EMOTION of suffering (mood, feeling). One leads to letting go, the other, perhaps worsening of the problem, perhaps understanding its roots.

with metta

RYB
Thank you for making the comparison. Now let me add a little more : :thanks:
I think clinging to feeling (vedana-khandha) is dukkha. Feeling, according to the Dependent origination principle, is an origination of dukkha
(since craving follows feeling).

Dhamma Spoon
A soup spoon does not know the taste of the soup.
A dhamma spoon does not know the taste of the Dhamma!

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ground
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Re: Wise Understanding of Dukkha

Post by ground » Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:01 am

I would suggest the following view:
Perfect renunciation is one cause of liberation. Disenchantment is one cause of perfect renunciation. Disenchantment entails not clinging to what is called "life" in any way and that means not expecting anything from what is called "life". If there remains anything about "life" which does not stand for "dukkha" then this may be the crucial obstacle. Because what is "life"? It is the total of thought experiences in the context of the past, thought experiences in the context of the present and thought experiences in context of the future and all these are thought about in the context of "I" and "mine". Active rejection of the idea that all of "life" is dukkha necessarily is concomittant with attachment to "life". Being attached to "life" is being attached to experiences is being attached to phenomena is being attached to the thought of being the experiencer i.e. being attached to "I" and "mine".
The decisive point for the extension of the meaning of "dukkha" in one's mind seems to be the intention. A mind really intent on liberation will not accept a compromise. However a mind really intent on liberation actually is an effect of practice because initially the self-centered striving for what is commonly called "happiness" prevails.

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dhamma_spoon
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Re: Wise Understanding of Dukkha

Post by dhamma_spoon » Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:21 am

Dear Dhamma friend TMing (and other readers) -

I found myself nodding often as I was reading through your Dhamma-wise comment. Yes, I totally agree with your suggestion. :thanks:

TMing: "Perfect renunciation is one cause of liberation. Disenchantment is one cause of perfect renunciation. Disenchantment entails not clinging to what is called "life" in any way and that means not expecting anything from what is called "life". If there remains anything about "life" which does not stand for "dukkha" then this may be the crucial obstacle. Because what is "life"? It is the total of thought experiences in the context of the past, thought experiences in the context of the present and thought experiences in context of the future and all these are thought about in the context of "I" and "mine". Active rejection of the idea that all of "life" is dukkha necessarily is concomittant with attachment to "life". Being attached to "life" is being attached to experiences is being attached to phenomena is being attached to the thought of being the experiencer i.e. being attached to "I" and "mine".
The decisive point for the extension of the meaning of "dukkha" in one's mind seems to be the intention. A mind really intent on liberation will not accept a compromise. However a mind really intent on liberation actually is an effect of practice because initially the self-centered striving for what is commonly called "happiness" prevails.

Dhamma_spoon : The last sentence is a crucial balance to the extreme view that only sees "no self", "no doer", "nobody practices".

But who am I to say? I am just a spoon, hanging in there. :stirthepot:
A soup spoon does not know the taste of the soup.
A dhamma spoon does not know the taste of the Dhamma!

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