Buddho

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
Posts: 2204
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

Re: Buddho

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:36 pm

dhammarelax wrote:
befriend wrote:is repeating buddho, buddho... a form of concentration practice, vipassana or both?


If you consider right concentration as jhana, the right answer might be none.

smile all the time
dhammarelax


Are you saying that you don't believe in the efficacy of the practice?
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
My Practice Blog:
http://khalilbodhi.wordpress.com

dhammarelax
Posts: 1087
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:59 pm

Re: Buddho

Postby dhammarelax » Fri Jul 31, 2015 7:30 pm

Khalil Bodhi wrote:
dhammarelax wrote:
befriend wrote:is repeating buddho, buddho... a form of concentration practice, vipassana or both?


If you consider right concentration as jhana, the right answer might be none.

smile all the time
dhammarelax


Are you saying that you don't believe in the efficacy of the practice?


I have tried it and the only relevant result that I got once is that the mind started perceiving a bright white light and it sharpened the awareness quite a bit, it was not effective for me. Bhante Vimalaramsi goes further declaring it to be "wishful thinking". I think that the chances of it leading to jhana are very slim.

smile all the time
dhammarelax
Even if the flesh & blood in my body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, I will use all my human firmness, human persistence and human striving. There will be no relaxing my persistence until I am the first of my generation to attain full awakening in this lifetime. ed. AN 2.5

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 5486
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Fri Jul 31, 2015 9:03 pm

dhammarelax wrote:
I have tried it and the only relevant result that I got once is that the mind started perceiving a bright white light and it sharpened the awareness quite a bit, it was not effective for me. Bhante Vimalaramsi goes further declaring it to be "wishful thinking". I think that the chances of it leading to jhana are very slim.

smile all the time
dhammarelax


Just because it did not work for you does not mean it does not work. Bhante Vimalaramsi does not have the final say on all matters.

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
Posts: 2204
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

Re: Buddho

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Fri Jul 31, 2015 9:42 pm

bodom wrote:
dhammarelax wrote:
I have tried it and the only relevant result that I got once is that the mind started perceiving a bright white light and it sharpened the awareness quite a bit, it was not effective for me. Bhante Vimalaramsi goes further declaring it to be "wishful thinking". I think that the chances of it leading to jhana are very slim.

smile all the time
dhammarelax


Just because it did not work for you does not mean it does not work. Bhante Vimalaramsi does not have the final say on all matters.

:anjali:


:goodpost:
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
My Practice Blog:
http://khalilbodhi.wordpress.com

User avatar
badscooter
Posts: 400
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:07 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: Buddho

Postby badscooter » Fri Jul 31, 2015 11:16 pm

dhammarelax wrote:
I have tried it and the only relevant result that I got once is that the mind started perceiving a bright white light and it sharpened the awareness quite a bit, it was not effective for me. Bhante Vimalaramsi goes further declaring it to be "wishful thinking". I think that the chances of it leading to jhana are very slim.

smile all the time
dhammarelax

Considering Vimalaramsi never practiced in that tradition, his declaration shows his small mindedness and ego!
"whatever one frequently thinks and ponders upon will be the inclination of one's mind"

User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 4537
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Re: Buddho

Postby clw_uk » Sat Aug 01, 2015 11:48 pm

dhammarelax wrote:
befriend wrote:is repeating buddho, buddho... a form of concentration practice, vipassana or both?


If you consider right concentration as jhana, the right answer might be none.

smile all the time
dhammarelax



And yet, Jhana is absorption ;)
The dogmatists have claimed to have found the truth, others say that it cannot be apprehended; the Sceptics continue the search.
Sextus Empiricus

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14713
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Buddho

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 1:43 am


jollybean
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 5:55 am

Re: Buddho

Postby jollybean » Fri Aug 21, 2015 3:25 pm

I'd just like to share my experience...

Over the years, I've experimented with using "buddho", "in" and "out", and counting the breaths from "1... 10" as mental repetitions.

What I found is that mentally repeating "buddho" doesn't feel nearly as smooth and comfortable, if you will, as counting "1... 10".

I don't know why that is, perhaps something to do with the tone/pronunciation in the mind. For example, I've even tried "buddha" instead of "buddho", and it's a lot more comfortable for me.

Of course, this is entirely personal, so I believe whatever works for someone else does not necessarily mean it will work best for you.

Eventually, mentally counting "1... 10" works best for me in quieting the mind, until I'm focused on the breath.

Richkierich
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon May 16, 2016 4:17 am

Re: Buddho

Postby Richkierich » Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:57 am

Greetings,

I am sorry to have to bump an old thread, but I have a question regarding Buddho, so I thought I could ask in here.

I am practicing reciting Buddho not only during meditation to still and calm the mind, but also in daily activities, so that the mind stays with what I am doing, just one thing I would like to clarify though, do I focus on the word Buddho? Or the actual activity I am doing while reciting Buddho?

Like for example, in breath, Bud, out breath, Dho, here, do I place my focus on the word Bud...Dho itself? Or do I focus on the in and out breath? Same goes, while doing something, do I focus on the word Buddho, or the act of the chore itself?

I am sorry to ask this, but this got me real confused :? Any advise for me?

Much much thanks :anjali:

User avatar
massara
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat May 21, 2016 3:34 am
Location: Brazil
Contact:

Re: Buddho

Postby massara » Mon Nov 28, 2016 3:21 am

jollybean wrote:I'd just like to share my experience...

Over the years, I've experimented with using "buddho", "in" and "out", and counting the breaths from "1... 10" as mental repetitions.

What I found is that mentally repeating "buddho" doesn't feel nearly as smooth and comfortable, if you will, as counting "1... 10".

I don't know why that is, perhaps something to do with the tone/pronunciation in the mind. For example, I've even tried "buddha" instead of "buddho", and it's a lot more comfortable for me.

Of course, this is entirely personal, so I believe whatever works for someone else does not necessarily mean it will work best for you.

Eventually, mentally counting "1... 10" works best for me in quieting the mind, until I'm focused on the breath.



Interesting. The word Buddho simply doesn t work for me, but Buddha is pretty much more confortable to repeat. So I use it and the mind becomes calm. Sometimes I keep repeating Buddha to make myself aware that I am unaware. :jumping:
I tried to count the breaths but it didn t work well. So I use Buddha or just the silent aware of the in and out breath.

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 5486
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:17 pm

Richkierich wrote:Greetings,

I am sorry to have to bump an old thread, but I have a question regarding Buddho, so I thought I could ask in here.

I am practicing reciting Buddho not only during meditation to still and calm the mind, but also in daily activities, so that the mind stays with what I am doing, just one thing I would like to clarify though, do I focus on the word Buddho? Or the actual activity I am doing while reciting Buddho?

Like for example, in breath, Bud, out breath, Dho, here, do I place my focus on the word Bud...Dho itself? Or do I focus on the in and out breath? Same goes, while doing something, do I focus on the word Buddho, or the act of the chore itself?

I am sorry to ask this, but this got me real confused :? Any advise for me?

Much much thanks :anjali:


Hi Richkierich,

Sorry for the late reply. See my reply's in this thread here:

Methods for increasing mindfulness in daily life as a lay person
viewtopic.php?t=24280

I believe it may answer your question.

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

Richkierich
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon May 16, 2016 4:17 am

Re: Buddho

Postby Richkierich » Thu Dec 01, 2016 10:23 am

bodom wrote:
Richkierich wrote:Greetings,

I am sorry to have to bump an old thread, but I have a question regarding Buddho, so I thought I could ask in here.

I am practicing reciting Buddho not only during meditation to still and calm the mind, but also in daily activities, so that the mind stays with what I am doing, just one thing I would like to clarify though, do I focus on the word Buddho? Or the actual activity I am doing while reciting Buddho?

Like for example, in breath, Bud, out breath, Dho, here, do I place my focus on the word Bud...Dho itself? Or do I focus on the in and out breath? Same goes, while doing something, do I focus on the word Buddho, or the act of the chore itself?

I am sorry to ask this, but this got me real confused :? Any advise for me?

Much much thanks :anjali:


Hi Richkierich,

Sorry for the late reply. See my reply's in this thread here:

Methods for increasing mindfulness in daily life as a lay person
viewtopic.php?t=24280

I believe it may answer your question.

:namaste:


Thank you very much Bodom, that was really useful and pretty much answered my confusion. Bookmarked the page for future references.

:anjali:

User avatar
Laurens
Posts: 408
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:56 pm
Location: Norfolk, England

Re: Buddho

Postby Laurens » Fri Dec 23, 2016 9:59 am

I use Buddho sometimes if my mind is particularly unfocused. The issue I have is that the instructions tend to state "repeat untill no longer needed". I will use Buddho until the attention seems fixed on the breath but then when I drop it I go back to square one.

Does anyone with a bit more experience have any suggestions as to whether there are any signalling factors that suggest buddho is no longer needed? Do I just carry on until it fades away on its own or keep dropping it and picking it up until I dont need to pick it up again?
"For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."

Carl Sagan

jollybean
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 5:55 am

Re: Buddho

Postby jollybean » Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:58 pm

Laurens wrote:I use Buddho sometimes if my mind is particularly unfocused. The issue I have is that the instructions tend to state "repeat untill no longer needed". I will use Buddho until the attention seems fixed on the breath but then when I drop it I go back to square one.

Does anyone with a bit more experience have any suggestions as to whether there are any signalling factors that suggest buddho is no longer needed? Do I just carry on until it fades away on its own or keep dropping it and picking it up until I dont need to pick it up again?


Hi Laurens,

One of the most descriptive experiences of Buddho meditation can be found in the words of Ajahn Maha Boowa from The Path to Arahantship:

"MY CHOICE WAS BUDDHO MEDITATION. From the moment I made my resolve, I kept my mind from straying from the repetition of buddho. From the moment I awoke in the morning until I slept at night, I forced myself to think only of buddho. At the same time, I ceased to be preoccupied with thoughts of progress and decline: If my meditation made progress, it would do so with buddho; if it declined, it would go down with buddho. In either case, buddho was my sole preoccupation. All other concerns were irrelevant.

Maintaining such single-minded concentration is not an easy task. I had to literally force my mind to remain entwined with buddho each and every moment without interruption. Regardless of whether I was seated in meditation, walking meditation or simply doing my daily chores, the word buddho resonated deeply within my mind at all times. By nature and temperament, I was always extremely resolute and uncompromising. This tendency worked to my advantage. In the end, I became so earnestly committed to the task that nothing could shake my resolve; no errant thought could separate the mind from buddho.

Working at this practice day after day, I always made certain that buddho resonated in close harmony with my present-moment awareness. Soon, I began to see the results of calm and concentration arise clearly within the citta, the mind’s essential knowing nature. At that stage, I began to see the very subtle and refined nature of the citta. The longer I internalized buddho, the more subtle the citta became, until eventually the subtlety of buddho and the subtlety of the citta melded into one another and became one and the same essence of knowing. I could not separate buddho from the citta’s subtle nature. Try as I might, I could not make the word buddho appear in my mind. Through diligence and perseverance, buddho had become so closely unified with the citta that buddho itself no longer appeared within my awareness. The mind had become so calm and still, so profoundly subtle, that nothing, not even buddho, resonated there. This meditative state is analogous to the disappearance of the breath, as mentioned above.

When this took place, I felt bewildered. I had predicated my whole practice on holding steadfastly to buddho. Now that buddho was no longer apparent, where would I focus my attention? Up to this point, buddho had been my mainstay. Now it had disappeared. No matter how hard I tried to recover this focus, it was lost. I was in a quandary. All that remained then was the citta’s profoundly subtle knowing nature, a pure and simple awareness, bright and clear. There was nothing concrete within that awareness to latch on to.

I realized then that nothing invades the mind’s sphere of awareness when consciousness—its knowing presence—reaches such a profound and subtle condition. I was left with only one choice: With the loss of buddho, I had to focus my attention on the essential sense of awareness and knowing that was all-present and prominent at that moment. That consciousness had not disappeared; on the contrary, it was all-pervasive. All of the mindful awareness that had concentrated on the repetition of buddho was then firmly refocused on the very subtle knowing presence of the calm and converged citta. My attention remained firmly fixed on that subtle knowing essence until eventually its prominence began to fade, allowing my normal awareness to become reestablished.

As normal awareness returned, buddho manifested itself once more. So I immediately refocused my attention on the repetition of my meditation-word. Before long, my daily practice assumed a new rhythm: I concentrated intently on buddho until consciousness resolved into the clear, brilliant state of the mind’s essential knowing nature, remaining absorbed in that subtle knowing presence until normal awareness returned; and I then refocused with increased vigor on the repetition of buddho.

It was during this stage that I first gained a solid spiritual foundation in my meditation practice..."

User avatar
Javi
Posts: 363
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 5:40 pm
Location: Miami, Florida

Re: Buddho

Postby Javi » Fri Jan 13, 2017 1:24 am

I am interested in Buddho as Vipassana, are there more instructions on how it can be used in this sense?

In the mental recitation method for one-pointedness of the citta notice "who" is reciting "Buddho". One should look at the citta when it is calm. Let mindfulness watch the base and when any sense object arises let the object go and continue watching the citta. - Luang Pu Atulo

Many forest bhikkhus in North-East of Thailand use the word 'Buddho' as their meditation object. They use it as a kind of koan, firstly they calm the mind by following the inhalations and exhalations using the syllables 'Bud-dho' and then begin to contemplate 'What is Buddho, the "one who knows"?' 'What is the knowing?' - Sumedho


In most of the quotes here, it seems like Bud-dho is being used as a basis for samatha, and once it fades away one is in a deep jhana state. However it also seems like Bud-dho can be used for insight practice as per the above quotes.
Vayadhammā saṅkhārā appamādena sampādethā — All things decay and disappoint, it is through vigilance that you succeed — Mahāparinibbāna Sutta

Tārakā timiraṃ dīpo māyāvaśyāya budbudaḥ supinaṃ vidyud abhraṃ ca evaṃ draṣṭavya saṃskṛtam — A shooting star, a clouding of the sight, a lamp, An illusion, a drop of dew, a bubble, A dream, a lightning’s flash, a thunder cloud — This is the way one should see the conditioned — Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā

I have seen all things that are done under the sun, and behold, all is vanity and a chase after wind — Ecclesiastes 1.14

User avatar
acinteyyo
Posts: 1684
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 9:48 am
Location: Bavaria / Germany

Re: Buddho

Postby acinteyyo » Fri Jan 20, 2017 2:41 pm

Javi wrote:I am interested in Buddho as Vipassana, are there more instructions on how it can be used in this sense?

In the mental recitation method for one-pointedness of the citta notice "who" is reciting "Buddho". One should look at the citta when it is calm. Let mindfulness watch the base and when any sense object arises let the object go and continue watching the citta. - Luang Pu Atulo

Many forest bhikkhus in North-East of Thailand use the word 'Buddho' as their meditation object. They use it as a kind of koan, firstly they calm the mind by following the inhalations and exhalations using the syllables 'Bud-dho' and then begin to contemplate 'What is Buddho, the "one who knows"?' 'What is the knowing?' - Sumedho


In most of the quotes here, it seems like Bud-dho is being used as a basis for samatha, and once it fades away one is in a deep jhana state. However it also seems like Bud-dho can be used for insight practice as per the above quotes.

The mere technique of reciting mentally the syllables "Bud-dho" while simultaneously directing mindfulness to that very process of reciting leads to a calm mind which eventually becomes a basis for samadhi. The insight practice begins, when the mind is calmed, with the contemplation of "the one who knows" (that is the meaning of "Buddho"), i.e. the citta or in other words what is the "knowing", that knows the knowing?

Luang Pu Atulo once said,
Gifts he left behind wrote:"The mind seeing the mind is the path.
The result of the mind seeing the mind is the cessation of suffering."


To develop insight one shifts from merely being mindful of the meditation object, here the syllables "Bud-dho", to contemplating the mind itself, the citta, that which knows the meditation object. When one is able to be mindful of and to contemplate what knows the meditation object (the syllables "Bud-dho"), then one can shift ones attention to what knows the knowing of the meditation object. There the syllables "Bud-dho" have completed their task. One contemplates the citta only and develops insight from there.

best wishes, acinteyyo
Thag 1.20. Ajita - I do not fear death; nor do I long for life. I’ll lay down this body, aware and mindful.


Return to “General meditation-related issues”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 15 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine