How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Aloka
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by Aloka » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:30 am

tiltbillings wrote:
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote: When a teacher achieves mythical status, and his or her devotees start to think that he or she is beyond reproach, it is very dangerous for the preservation of the true teachings.
I have the highest regard for Ven Sumedho, but I agree with what you saying here.
Personally I think it is also very dangerous to rely entirely on the views and opinions of others in internet groups. Its is important to investigate for oneself in the outside world.

:anjali:

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Mr Man
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by Mr Man » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:40 am

tiltbillings wrote:
Mr Man wrote:
tiltbillings wrote: I have the highest regard for Ven Sumedho, but I agree with what you saying here.
I'm not sure if Bhikkhu Pesala was referring to Ven. Sumedho here but I don't think that I or anyone has suggested that Ven. Sumedho is beyond reproach.
It applies.
What applies? Who has said Ven. Sumedho is beyond reproach.

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Mr Man
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by Mr Man » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:41 am

Aloka wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote: When a teacher achieves mythical status, and his or her devotees start to think that he or she is beyond reproach, it is very dangerous for the preservation of the true teachings.
I have the highest regard for Ven Sumedho, but I agree with what you saying here.
Personally I think it is also very dangerous to rely entirely on the views and opinions of others in internet groups. Its is important to investigate for oneself in the outside world.

:anjali:
Yes. I agree.

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tiltbillings
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by tiltbillings » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:48 am

Mr Man wrote: What applies? Who has said Ven. Sumedho is beyond reproach.
What was said.
>> Do you see a man wise [enlightened/ariya] in his own eyes? There is more hope for a fool than for him.<< -- Proverbs 26:12

This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond. -- SN I, 38.

“Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?” HPatDH p.723

Sanjay PS
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by Sanjay PS » Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:07 pm

Buddhas have always kept their teaching simple .

" Abstain from unwholesome actions , perform wholesome actions and purify your mind " .

They have also given us very simple , very ordinary tools in purifying our minds . Keep observing the natural flow of the breath , feeling on the sensations , develop equanimity based on the changing nature of the sensations , develop your own wisdom. However , mystical , magical or extraordinary be the experience and the powers gained , they pale in comparison to the quintessential insight of annica , dukkha and annata ........that which keeps on changing is nothing but sorrow , having nothing to abide by .

This has always been their best advise of the past , the present and of the future .
The Path of Dhamma

The path of Dhamma is no picnic . It is a strenuous march steeply up the hill . If all the comrades desert you , Walk alone ! Walk alone ! with all the Thrill !!

U S.N. Goenka

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Jason
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Re: How Is Good Kamma Related To Nibbana

Post by Jason » Thu Oct 24, 2013 2:08 pm

Skillful kamma, and particularly the kamma leading to the end of kamma (i.e., the noble eightfold path), leads us to a place where nibbana can be realized, a place where craving can be destroyed. Once craving, the root of the defilements (kilesas), has been eliminated, the skillful/unskillful kammic dichotomy, too, is eliminated since kamma is a mental component inherently tied to, and influenced by, greed, hatred, and delusion. Hence the noble eightfold path is called "the path of practice leading to the cessation of kamma" because they're skillful actions that, when used appropriately, have the potential to ultimately lead to the elimination of the skillful/unskillful dichotomy altogether, leaving only happiness (Dhp XV), contentment (Thag 9), peace (Snp 2.1), freedom (SN 36.31), and moral perfection behind (AN 9.7). As St. Maximus writes in Opuscula theologica et polemica (albeit from a Christian perspective), "A perfect nature has no need of choice, for it knows naturally what is good. Its freedom is based on this knowledge."
"Sabbe dhamma nalam abhinivesaya" (AN 7.58).

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