The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Sekha
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by Sekha » Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:03 pm

Khalil Bodhi wrote:Hi Everyone,

Just in case anyone was wondering, my aditthana is still going strong. To help myself I have put together a lst of resources in Pali and English to help me not only memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana sutta but, dare I say, to understand it. I have actually decided to pay to host the files in case whoever is serving them up now goes under later. Please let me know if you have more to add and I will update the page accordingly: http://khalilbodhi.wordpress.com/daily- ... ana-sutta/
If you want to understand every word of the Pali text, which will ease greatly the memorization process, I would recommend this resource, with an infobubble on every Pali word:
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samy ... 6-011.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Where knowledge ends, religion begins. - B. Disraeli

http://www.buddha-vacana.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Khalil Bodhi
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by Khalil Bodhi » Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:28 pm

Thank you Sekha! I am working to memorize the Pali first and translating chunks of important sections for now. I definitely intend to do a line by line translation as I progress.
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by theY » Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:48 am

Hi dears,

I use to memorize pāli and translate it word to word. I try to memorize by the fixed time. I don't care how much I had remember, but I care "Have I tried to memorize at all my fixed time?".

Memorization in everything-- pali, meaning, face, leg, satta, sabhāva, good, even though in bad thing, is the nearest cause of sati.

We should change the behavior of saññā. Don't stop it, because that acting is useless. We can't stop saññā.
Above message maybe out of date. Latest update will be in massage's link.
--------------------------------------------------
Tipitaka memorization is a rule of monks. It isn't just a choice. They must done it.
bahussuto nāma tividho hoti – nissayamuccanako, parisupaṭṭhāpako, bhikkhunovādakoti.
http://UnmixedTheravada.blogspot.com/20 ... monks.html

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Javi
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by Javi » Mon Mar 25, 2013 3:51 am

For memorizing things, I'm a huge fan of using the 'method of loci', also known as the memory palace technique. It's an ancient technique that was used by the Greeks and Romans to memorize speeches. They are still used to today, especially by people who participate in modern "memory championships". The feats of memory these mental athletes can achieve by using simple techniques is amazing, and this is one of the main ways they do it. I highly recommend checking this out, it really works wonders.
Vayadhammā saṅkhārā appamādena sampādethā — All things decay and disappoint, it is through vigilance that you succeed — Mahāparinibbāna Sutta

Self-taught poverty is a help toward philosophy, for the things which philosophy attempts to teach by reasoning, poverty forces us to practice. — Diogenes of Sinope

I have seen all things that are done under the sun, and behold, all is vanity and a chase after wind — Ecclesiastes 1.14

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by Coyote » Tue May 07, 2013 3:30 pm

I didn't actually get as far as I hoped in memorizing the karaniya metta sutta. But I am now looking at beginning again, maybe with something different this time.
So aside from the basic homages and refuges, what are some of the first chants that someone brought up as a buddhist might know or learn? Any ideas?
"If beings knew, as I know, the results of giving & sharing, they would not eat without having given, nor would the stain of miserliness overcome their minds. Even if it were their last bite, their last mouthful, they would not eat without having shared."
Iti 26

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Wed Jul 31, 2013 3:23 pm

Hi friends,

Since sharing of the following teaching has generated significant effect, I'm posting them here so that we can try to memorize these very important guidelines for our Dhamma practice, which I hope you don't mind reading again:

— From DN 16. Mahāparinibbāna Sutta —

To some of you, Ānanda, it may occur thus: 'The words of the Teacher have ended, there is a Teacher no longer'. But it should not, Ānanda, be so considered. Indeed, Ānanda, that which I have taught and made known to you as the Dhamma and the Vinaya will be your Teacher after my passing away.

— From SN 20.7 Āṇi Sutta —

In future time, there will be bhikkhus who will not listen to the utterance of such discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, they will not lend ear, they will not apply their mind on knowledge, they will not consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.

On the contrary, they will listen to the utterance of such discourses which are literary compositions made by poets, witty words, witty letters, by people from outside, or the words of disciples, they will lend ear, they will apply their mind on knowledge, they will consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.

Thus, bhikkhus, the discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, will disappear.

Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train thus: 'We will listen to the utterance of such discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, we will lend ear, we will apply our mind on knowledge, we will consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.' This is how, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves.

[from http://www.buddha-vacana.org/]

— From SN 16.13 Saddhammapatirupaka Sutta: A Counterfeit of the True Dhamma —

"When beings are degenerating and the true Dhamma is disappearing, there are more training rules and yet fewer monks established in final gnosis. There is no disappearance of the true Dhamma as long as a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of the true Dhamma when a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has arisen in the world. Just as there is no disappearance of gold as long as a counterfeit of gold has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of gold when a counterfeit of gold has arisen in the world, in the same way there is no disappearance of the true Dhamma as long as a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of the true Dhamma when a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has arisen in the world.

"It's not the earth property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's not the water property... the fire property... the wind property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's worthless people who arise right here [within the Sangha] who make the true Dhamma disappear. The true Dhamma doesn't disappear the way a boat sinks all at once.

"These five downward-leading qualities tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma. Which five? There is the case where the monks, nuns, male lay followers, & female lay followers live without respect, without deference, for the Teacher. They live without respect, without deference, for the Dhamma... for the Sangha... for the Training... for concentration. These are the five downward-leading qualities that tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma.

"But these five qualities tend to the stability, the non-confusion, the non-disappearance of the true Dhamma. Which five? There is the case where the monks, nuns, male lay followers, & female lay followers live with respect, with deference, for the Teacher. They live with respect, with deference, for the Dhamma... for the Sangha... for the Training... for concentration. These are the five qualities that tend to the stability, the non-confusion, the non-disappearance of the true Dhamma."

[from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html]

— From AN 5.16. Saddhammavaggo (On the good Teaching) —

04."Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu listens to the Teaching carefully, recites it carefully, keeps it in mind carefully, examines the meanings of the Teaching in the mind carefully. Knowing the meanings and the Teaching apply the method of practising it carefully. Bhikkhus, these five things conduce to the non-confusion and non-disappearance of the good Teaching."

07. "Again, bhikkhus, the elder bhikkhus do not give to abundance, are not lethargic, not giving up seclusion and the main aim, arouse effort to attain the not yet attained and to realize the not yet realized. By that the later generation follow them and do not give to abundance, become lethargic, not giving up seclusion and the main aim, arouses effort to attain the not yet attained or to realize the not yet realized. Bhikkhus, this is the fourth thing that conduces to the long standing, non-confusion and non-disappearance of the good Teaching."


Metta to all !

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:03 pm

SN 22.43 Attadiipaa Sutta: An Island to Oneself
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .wlsh.html

"Monks, be islands unto yourselves, be your own refuge, having no other; let the Dhamma be an island and a refuge to you, having no other. Those who are islands unto themselves... should investigate to the very heart of things: 'What is the source of sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair? How do they arise?'

...

"But seeing the body's (the form's) impermanence, its change-ability, its waning, its ceasing, he says 'formerly as now, all bodies (forms) were impermanent and unsatisfactory, and subject to change.' Thus, seeing this as it really is, with perfect insight, he abandons all sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair. He is not worried at their abandonment (With their abandonment he is not worried?), but unworried lives at ease, and thus living at ease he is said to be 'assuredly delivered.'" [Similarly with 'feelings,' 'perceptions,' 'volitions,' 'consciousness'].

I wish I could always remember this teaching and search inside instead of outside, and investigate to the very heart of sufferings: 'What is the source of sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair? How do they arise?' (and how to abandon them?)

Happy Uposatha!

PS: a similar teaching by the Buddha in DN 16

"I, Ānanda, at present, am old, elderly, of great age, far gone, advanced in years, I am eighty years old. It is like, Ānanda, an old cart, which only keeps going when shored up with bamboo, just so, Ānanda, I think the Realised One’s body only keeps going when shored up with bamboo.

When the Realised One doesn’t pay attention, Ānanda, to any of the signs, when all feelings have ceased, he lives having established the signless mind-concentration, and at that time, Ānanda, the Realised One’s body is most comfortable.

Therefore, Ānanda, live with yourself as an island, yourself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge. And how, Ānanda, does a monk live with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge?

Here, Ānanda, a monk dwells contemplating the nature of the body in the body, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of feelings in feelings, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of the mind in the mind, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of things in various things, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world.

Thus, Ānanda, a monk lives with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge. For whoever, Ānanda, whether at present or after my passing, lives with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge, those monks of mine, Ānanda, will go from darkness to the highest—whoever likes the training.”
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Sat Sep 14, 2013 12:23 am

I hope that the following teaching can be not only memorized by heart but also applied in daily practice:

"Monks, even if bandits were to carve you up savagely, limb by limb, with a two-handled saw, he who let his heart harbor hate toward them would not be carrying out my teaching. Even then you should train yourselves: 'Our hearts will be unaffected and we will say no evil words. We will remain compassionate, with a heart of loving kindness and good will, and with no inner hate. We will keep pervading these people with thoughts imbued with loving kindness and good will and, beginning with them, we will keep pervading the all-encompassing world with thoughts imbued with loving kindness and good will — abundant (like the great earth), exalted (like empty space), immeasurable (like the river Ganges), free from hostility and free from ill will (like the catskin bag).' This is how you should train yourselves."

"Monks, if you keep this admonition on the simile of the saw constantly in mind, do you see any any mode of speech, subtle or gross, that you could not endure?"

"No, Lord."

"Therefore, monks, you should keep this admonition on the Simile of the Saw constantly in mind. That will conduce to your long-term welfare & happiness."

(MN 21)

Metta to all!
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:34 am

I am trying to memorize the following teaching and practice metta accordingly:

May all beings (and I) be safe and secure;
May all beings (and I) be well and happy.
[May their (and my) heart be full of metta,
freed from anger, ill will, and hostility,
& be at peace.]

Whatever beings there are,
weak or strong, without exception,
great, medium, or small,
seen & unseen,
near or far,
born & unborn,
May all beings be well and happy!

Let no one deceive another,
Or despise anyone anywhere.
Or through anger or hate,
Wish harm upon another.

As a mother would risk her life
to protect her child, her only child,
even so should one cultivate an all-embracing loving heart
towards all beings.

With love and good will for all beings,
cultivate an all-embracing loving heart:
Radiate love to the entire cosmos:
Above, below, & all around,
unhindered (by defilements/hindrances), without ill will, without enmity.

Whether standing, walking,
sitting, or lying down,
as long as awake,
sustain this recollection.
This is said to be a sublime abiding
here & now.

From Sn 1.8 Karaniya Metta Sutta
(The translation is synthesized from various sources, mainly http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html)

Here is a more original translation of the sutta based on Bhante Ānandajoti's word to word breakdown translation: ttp://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/Texts-an ... alysis.htm (with minor changes)

What should be done by one skilful in good,
who has comprehended the state of peace:
he ought to be able, straight, and upright,
easy to speak to, meek, not conceited,
content, easy to support,
with few duties, and living lightly,
with peaceful faculties, prudent, modest,
and no greed for supporters.

Do not do the slightest thing
that the wise would later censure.

(May all beings) be happy and secure, may all beings be happy in heart!
Whatsoever breathing beings there are
- weak, strong, or any other,
whether they be long or great, of middle size, short, tiny, or of compact (body),
those who are seen, and those who are unseen,
those who live far away, those who are near,
those who are born, and those who still seek birth
- may all beings in their hearts be happy!

No one should cheat another,
nor should he despise anyone anywhere,
he should not long for suffering for another
because of anger or resentment.
in the same way as a mother would protect her child,
her only child, with her life,
so toward all beings
he should develop the measureless thought (of friendliness).

Towards the whole world
he should develop the measureless thought of friendliness,
above, below, and all around,
without barriers, hate, or enemy.
Standing, walking, sitting, lying, for as long as he is without torpor,
he should be resolved on this mindfulness,
for this, they say here, is the Brahmam abiding.

without grasping views, virtuous,
and endowed with insight,
having removed greed for sense pleasures,
he will never come to lie in a womb again.

小部經集 I.8

慈經

一個善於修習善法,希望心境寧靜的人,
他應如是努力:
能幹、端正、直接、
善順易教、溫和、不骄慢、
知足、易養、
少俗務、生活淡薄簡樸、
諸根寂靜、谨言慎行、
謙虛、對供養者不貪。

不做任何
事後受智者指責之事。

(他應該要這樣發願:) 喜樂、平安,
願一切衆生心中充满喜樂。
一切衆生,無一例外,
無論軟弱、強壯、
長、大、
中等、短小、
精細、粗顯、
可見、不可見、
遠、近、
已出生的、將出生的:
願一切衆生心中充满喜樂。

願人們不相互欺騙、
不鄙視任何地方的任何人,
不以怒意、敵意,
願他人受苦。

如一位母親
舍命保護獨子,
他更應對一切衆生
修养無量之慈心。

以對全宇宙的善意,
散發無量之慈念:
充滿上方、下方,及橫遍十方,
沒有任何的障礙,沒有任何的仇恨及敵意。

無論站、行、
坐、臥,
凡清醒時,
他應當保持此念。
這稱為即時即地的
梵住之心。

不受觀念左右,
有戒德與,具足觀智,
滅除了感官貪欲,
他不再投胎。

集结http://nanda.online-dhamma.net/Tipitaka/Sutta/Khuddaka/Khuddaka-patha/Metta.htm (有修改)

Metta to all!
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Wed Jan 08, 2014 3:21 pm

Greetings!

I heard the following teaching again and have realized that we should really bear it in heart and apply the teaching to our own practice, instead of blindly follow the following four types of teachers:

The Mahāpadesa Sutta.
Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation in Numerical Discourses:

The Great References

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Bhoganagara near the Ānanda Shrine. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: “Bhikkhus!”

“Venerable sir!” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

“Bhikkhus, I will teach you these four great references. Listen and attend closely; I will speak.”

“Yes, Bhante,” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

“What, bhikkhus, are the four great references?

(1) “Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu might say: ‘In the presence of the Blessed One I heard this; in his presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching!”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are not included among the discourses and are not to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is not the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been badly learned by this bhikkhu.’ Thus you should discard it.

“But a bhikkhu might say: ‘In the presence of the Blessed One I heard this; in his presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching!”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are included among the discourses and are to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been learned well by this bhikkhu.’ You should remember this first great reference.

(2) “Then a bhikkhu might say: ‘In such and such a residence a Saṅgha is dwelling with elders and prominent monks. In the presence of that Saṅgha I heard this; in its presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching.”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are not included among the discourses and are not to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is not the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been badly learned by that Saṅgha.’ Thus you should discard it.

“But … if, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are included among the discourses and are to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been learned well by that Saṅgha.’ You should remember this second great reference.

(3) “Then a bhikkhu might say: ‘In such and such a residence several elder bhikkhus are dwelling who are learned, heirs to the heritage, experts on the Dhamma, experts on the discipline, experts on the outlines. In the presence of those elders I heard this; in their presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching!”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are not included among the discourses and are not to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is not the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been badly learned by those elders.’ Thus you should discard it.

“But … if, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are included among the discourses and are to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been learned well by those elders.’ You should remember this third great reference.

(4) “Then a bhikkhu might say: ‘In such and such a residence one elder bhikkhu is dwelling [170] who is learned, an heir to the heritage, an expert on the Dhamma, an expert on the discipline, an expert on the outlines. In the presence of that elder I heard this; in his presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching!”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are not included among the discourses and are not to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is not the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been badly learned by that elder.’ Thus you should discard it.

“But a bhikkhu might say: ‘In such and such a residence one elder bhikkhu is dwelling who is learned, an heir to the heritage, an expert on the Dhamma, an expert on the discipline, an expert on the outlines. In the presence of that elder I heard this; in his presence I learned this: “This is the Dhamma; this is the discipline; this is the Teacher’s teaching!”’ That bhikkhu’s statement should neither be approved nor rejected. Without approving or rejecting it, you should thoroughly learn those words and phrases and then check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline. If, when you check for them in the discourses and seek them in the discipline, [you find that] they are included among the discourses and are to be seen in the discipline, you should draw the conclusion: ‘Surely, this is the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. It has been learned well by that elder.’ You should remember this fourth great reference.

“These, bhikkhus, are the four great references.”

_______________


We might think that we've been following the Buddha's teaching and path, but compare our practice with the above teaching -- are we really followers of the Buddha, or someone(s) else?

Metta to all!

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Tue May 13, 2014 11:14 pm

Miln 335

Whatever medicines are found
In the world — many and varied —
None are equal to the Dhamma.
Drink of this, monks!

And having drunk
The medicine of the Dhamma,
You'll be untouched by age and death.
Having meditated and seen —
(You'll be) healed by ceasing to cling.

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Tue May 20, 2014 1:46 am

Dhammapada 1. Pairs:

“He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.”
Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred.

“He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.”
Those who do not harbor such thoughts still their hatred.

Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world.
By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased.
This is a law eternal."

Note: "The Buddha's constant advice to His followers is not to retaliate but to practise patience at all times, at all places, even under provocation. The Buddha extols those who bear and forbear the wrongs of others though they have the power to retaliate. In the Dhammapada itself there are many instances to show how the Buddha practised patience even when He was severely criticised, abused, and attacked. Patience is not a sign of weakness or defeatism but the unfailing strength of great men and women."

[The translation is from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .budd.html; the note is from http://www.metta.lk/english/Narada/01-Y ... gga.htm#N8]
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:01 pm

Yamakavagga: Pairs

manopubbaṅgamā dhammā, ~ manoseṭṭhā manomayā,
manasā ce paduṭṭhena ~ bhāsati vā karoti vā,
tato naṁ dukkham-anveti ~ cakkaṁ va vahato padaṁ.

Mind [intentions/thoughts] is the forerunner of states [states of verbal/bodily acts, suffering or happiness, ...].
Mind is their chief; they are all produced by mind.
If with a corrupted mind [with malevolent intentions/thoughts]
a person speaks or acts,
suffering follows him
like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.

manopubbaïgamà dhammà, manoseññhà manomayà,
manasà ce pasannena bhàsati và karoti và,
tato naü sukham-anveti chàyà va anapàyinã. [2]

Mind [intentions/thoughts] is the forerunner of states.
Mind is their chief; they are all produced by mind.
If with a pure mind [with wholesome intentions/thoughts]
a person speaks or acts,
happiness follows him
like his never-departing shadow.

starter
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by starter » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:51 am

There are these five themes that should often be reflected upon by a woman or a man, by a householder or one gone forth:

(1) "I am subject to old age; I am not exempt from old age."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] youth's intoxication with youth. Because of that intoxication with youth, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that youth's intoxication with youth will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(2) "I am subject to illness; I am not exempt from illness."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] healthy person's intoxication with health. Because of that intoxication with health, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that healthy person's intoxication with health will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(3) "I am subject to death; I am not exempt from death."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] living person's intoxication with life. Because of that intoxication with life, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that living person's intoxication with life will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(4) "I must be parted and separated from all that is dear and appealing to me."

"There are beings who feel desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing. Because of that passion, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(5) "I am the owner of my kamma/actions, heir to my kamma/actions, born of my kamma/actions, related through my kamma/actions, and have my kamma/actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir."

"There are beings who conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that bad conduct in body, speech, and mind will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

"When he/she often reflects on this, the [factors of the] path take birth. He/she sticks with that path, develops it, cultivates it. As he/she sticks with that path, develops it and cultivates it, the fetters are abandoned, the obsessions destroyed."

[From AN 5.57 Upajjhatthana Sutta: Subjects for Contemplation]

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phil
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Post by phil » Thu Aug 14, 2014 10:46 pm

starter wrote:There are these five themes that should often be reflected upon by a woman or a man, by a householder or one gone forth:

(1) "I am subject to old age; I am not exempt from old age."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] youth's intoxication with youth. Because of that intoxication with youth, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that youth's intoxication with youth will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(2) "I am subject to illness; I am not exempt from illness."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] healthy person's intoxication with health. Because of that intoxication with health, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that healthy person's intoxication with health will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(3) "I am subject to death; I am not exempt from death."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] living person's intoxication with life. Because of that intoxication with life, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that living person's intoxication with life will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(4) "I must be parted and separated from all that is dear and appealing to me."

"There are beings who feel desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing. Because of that passion, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(5) "I am the owner of my kamma/actions, heir to my kamma/actions, born of my kamma/actions, related through my kamma/actions, and have my kamma/actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir."

"There are beings who conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that bad conduct in body, speech, and mind will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

"When he/she often reflects on this, the [factors of the] path take birth. He/she sticks with that path, develops it, cultivates it. As he/she sticks with that path, develops it and cultivates it, the fetters are abandoned, the obsessions destroyed."

[From AN 5.57 Upajjhatthana Sutta: Subjects for Contemplation]
I teach English as a second language as my vocation and although it is considered an old-fashioned method I encourage students to memorize sentences in order to internalize the target language. Internalizing the Buddhist teachings certainly a good idea as long as we can avoid ascribing some sort of magic power to it. I think I will use my phone's voice recorder to read the target passages out loud and listen later, that is another good way to help in the process.

I will start with this one Starter has selected. The Buddha recommends reflecting on it often as we know.

Phil
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)

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