Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Sat Sep 08, 2012 5:59 am

danieLion wrote:
Hanzze wrote:
but some users report TOTAL pain relief and little or no "intoxicating" side effects
Most drunkwards would swear that they are not drunken, even asked by the police. Of course they also report total relief of pain. That is what cheating brings about and it seems to be unintentional. What might be the cause?
We must be talking to different "drunkards"--if by "drunkard" you mean alcoholics. Perhaps they're the same drunkards that hang out on "the corner smoking skunk" Aloka swears are real?

And when those intoxicated on alcohol get asked by the police if they're intoxicated and they deny it, it's not because they forgot. It's because they're lying.

The cops I've interacted with don't interview people about pain.

I don't know what you mean by "cheating".

The only substantial reason pot's illegal is because the paper industry doesn't want it to be and they have money to lobby it into illegality.
danieLion,

look, the reason why one should better not take indoxicants is, because they change the awareness (good bad is not so the matter). So cheating will not be realised, the level of intention might be different, but the effect of indoxicants, even subtile is the same.

I did not talk about a lie while aware of it. If somebody would not believe that it is good for him, he would not take it. As long somebody believes that deeds have no real unwholesome effects, one will continue. Not knowing things now, it's good to relay on wise people. Buddha is hardly regarded as one.

And one further thing is that somebody with less understanding would simply imitate somebody who takes something out of another reason. So wise people even do not take indoxicats even if they would not be touched by it. For them on the way it's a selfprotection and for those more advanced a matter of protecting others.
Generally the blameless samples are wiser to be followed as those which are mainly maintained through constructions of thoughts and excuses.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_

danieLion
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by danieLion » Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:23 am

Hanzze,
Where did the Buddha say cannabis is an intoxicant?

And now I'm even less clear by what you mean by "cheating."

The principal reason cannabis is criminalized is because the powerful lobbies funded by the grossly wealthy paper and pharmaceutical industries believe it's not in their best interests.

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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:44 am

As told before, that is maybe not the wise way to approach the Dhamma. Where did he told not to kill a silverfish. Argue in this way is a kind of cheating, cheating is a appearence of curruption, curruption comes from clincing on what supports the self.

The precepts are simple and straight forward and are addoptable for any kind of state of awarness. To draw lines of matters to build up an ecxuse or a bridge to continue unwholesome habits may be usuall but break down if things are seen more objetivly and lesser in comparation with self evaluation.

Support one to violate virtue will have it's effect, you might observe it, as one needs to excuse and declare his ways and in this way think and brood over it permanently. Doubt and guilty conscience (if lack of moral shame is not very dominant) will go ahead with such things. Subtile or aware, this ripping kamma does not easily allow a further development of the other pathfactors leading to understanding.

The wise message of the Buddha in regard of this was simply:
Vanijja Sutta: Business (Wrong Livelihood)

"Monks, a lay follower should not engage in five types of business. Which five? Business in weapons, business in human beings, business in meat, business in intoxicants, and business in poison.

"These are the five types of business that a lay follower should not engage in."
Right action is the forrunner of right livelihood, and if understood and observed clearly, one would not be involved in a livelihood that is connected with violating precepts.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_

danieLion
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by danieLion » Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:08 am

Hanzze,
Well, at least I know what you mean by "cheating" now, but the rest is just puritanism as far as I can tell.

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tiltbillings
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by tiltbillings » Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:56 am

danieLion wrote: puritanism
There is a lot of that in the name of Buddhism.
>> Do you see a man wise [enlightened/ariya] in his own eyes? There is more hope for a fool than for him.<< -- Proverbs 26:12

This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond. -- SN I, 38.

“Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?” HPatDH p.723

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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:41 am

Buddha Dhamma is all about this:

Image

The non-doing of any evil,
the performance of what's skillful,
the cleansing of one's own mind:
this is the teaching
of the Awakened.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_


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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Mon Sep 10, 2012 6:47 am

I guess often equanimity is misunderstood as something we might experiances which is actually thina and/or middha.
Image
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_


danieLion
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by danieLion » Mon Sep 10, 2012 9:02 pm

Hanzze wrote:Buddha Dhamma is all about....
"Your use of the word "all" here demonstrates your puritanism.

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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Thu Sep 20, 2012 10:06 am

Some sentence in regard of compassion an what is meant by it for a Dhamma view, as well as what is regarded as a qualified doctor form Educating Compassion
...This means that the middle ground is where true compassion can be exercised. The Buddha sets out some guidelines for this area in his definition of the ideal nurse. You're qualified to tend to the sick if (1) you know how to prepare medicines; (2) you know what's amenable to the patient's cure, taking away whatever's unamenable and providing things that are amenable; (3) you're motivated by compassion and not by material gain; (4) you're not squeamish about cleaning up urine, excrement, saliva, or vomit; and (5) you're competent at encouraging the patient at the proper times with talk on Dharma.

Of these five qualifications, the one most discussed in the Pali canon is the fifth: What qualifies as a helpful and compassionate talk on Dharma to a person who is sick or dying? What doesn't?

Here again, the don'ts mark off the territory for the do's. The Vinaya cites cases where monks tell a sick person to focus his thoughts on dying, in the belief that death would be better than the miserable state of his life. The sick person does as they advise, he dies as a result, and the Buddha expels the monks from the monkhood. Thus, from the Buddha's perspective, encouraging a sick person to relax her grip on life or to give up the will to live would not count as an act of compassion. Instead of trying to ease the patient's transition to death, the Buddha focused on easing his or her insight into suffering and its end.

This is because he regarded every moment of life as an opportunity to practice and benefit from the Dharma. It's a well-known principle in all meditation traditions that a moment's insight into the pain of the present is far more beneficial than viewing the present moment with disgust and placing one's hopes on a better future. This principle applies as much at the end of life as it does anywhere in the middle. In fact, the Buddha encouraged his monks to reflect constantly on the potential imminence of death at every moment, even when in ordinary health, so that they could bring a sense of urgency to their practice and give the present moment their full attention. If you learn to treat all moments as potentially your last, then when your last moment does come you will face it prepared.

Most often, though, a sick or dying person hasn't been living with this sort of urgent alertness, so the first step in advising such a person is to aim at clearing away any emotional obstacles to learning from the present. The Pali texts note two such obstacles: worry over the responsibilities the person is leaving behind, and fear of death. In one poignant discourse, a man appears to be dying and his wife consoles him not to worry: She'll be able to provide for herself and their children in his absence; she won't go looking for another husband; and she'll continue in her practice of the Dharma. With each reassurance she repeats the refrain, "So don't be worried as you die. Death is painful for one who is worried. The Blessed One has warned against being worried at the time of death." The man recovers unexpectedly and, while still frail, goes to visit the Buddha, telling him of his wife's reassurances. The Buddha comments on how fortunate the man is for having such a wise and sympathetic wife. ...
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_


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Hanzze
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Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by Hanzze » Sat Sep 22, 2012 1:14 am

Are you a marijuana doctor or a just a cannabies user?
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_

danieLion
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Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 4:49 am

Re: Selling medicine marijuana, is it violate the 5th precept

Post by danieLion » Sat Sep 22, 2012 6:41 am

Hanzze wrote:Are you a marijuana doctor or a just a cannabies user?
your question is inappropriate...you ought to be ashamed of yourself


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