Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
santa100
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Re: Daily Dhamma 21:How to Transcend Bad Kamma

Post by santa100 » Fri Jul 13, 2012 4:24 pm

"Bear it, brahmin! Bear it, brahmin! you are experiencing here and now the result of deeds because of which you might have been tortured in hell for many years, for many hundreds of years, for many thousands of years" ~~ MN 86 ~~ (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; )

From Ven. Thanissaro's note #3, also check AN 3.99 (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ) for more detail explanation..

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yawares
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Re: Daily Dhamma 21:How to Transcend Bad Kamma

Post by yawares » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:14 pm

waimengwan wrote:I love the story of Angulimala!

The articles sounds like if we abandon negative actions and I sense there is regret in it as well then we will overcome our negative karma? Am I getting it right? If i get that right then just with regret and not doing those actions again I will purify my karma? [/color]
Dear waimengwan,
I think the Buddha's advice in this sutta is to acknowledge our wrong deeds and repent, Once the acknowledgement is open-mindedly made, we then proceed to abandon the kamma effect through the Noble Eightfold Path development. Of course, no more wrong doing again, once we have understood that it is wrong/evil.
----------
Coz Angulimala though he regret and stopped completely at some villages he was beaten to pulp. Do share if I have gotten it wrong.

Dear friend.....I'll post ANGULIMALA story tomorrow morning @Dhammic story....

Thanks for reading my article,
yawares

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yawares
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Re: Daily Dhamma 21:How to Transcend Bad Kamma

Post by yawares » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:18 pm

[quote="santa100"Bear it, brahmin! Bear it, brahmin! you are experiencing here and now the result of deeds because of which you might have been tortured in hell for many years, for many hundreds of years, for many thousands of years" ~~ MN 86 ~~ (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; )

From Ven. Thanissaro's note #3, also check AN 3.99 (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ) for more detail explanation..[/quote]
Dear santa100,

Thanks for your quote..very very nice indeed!
yawares

sattva
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Re: Daily Dhamma 21:How to Transcend Bad Kamma

Post by sattva » Fri Jul 13, 2012 9:44 pm

Thank you, Yawares :namaste:

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yawares
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Re: Daily Dhamma 21:How to Transcend Bad Kamma

Post by yawares » Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:20 am

sattva wrote:Thank you, Yawares :namaste:
Dear Sattva,
You're mostly welcome,
yawares

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yawares
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Daily Dhamma 22: Where Craving Originates and Ceases

Post by yawares » Sat Jul 14, 2012 5:13 am

Dear Members,

Daily Dhamma 22: Where Craving Originates and Ceases
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SariputtaDhamma/JTN/Mult]

The Greatest Teacher makes it clear that craving(ta.nhaa) originates at "whatever seems endearing and agreeable in terms of the world" (ya.m loke piyaruupa.m saataruupa.m). And craving ceases when "whatever seems endearing and agreeable in terms of the world" is abandoned.
...........

[Maha-satipatthana Sutta, DN 22:]

"And where does this craving, when arising, arise? And where, when dwelling, does it dwell?

"Whatever seems endearing and agreeable in terms of the world: that is where this craving, when arising, arises. That is where, when dwelling, it dwells.

"And where, when being abandoned, is this craving abandoned? And where, when ceasing, does it cease?

"Whatever is endearing & alluring in terms of the world: that is where, when being abandoned, this craving is abandoned. That is where, when ceasing, it ceases.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
.........

And what things are "endearing & alluring in terms of the world"?

According to DN 22, they are : sense objects (forms, sounds, ..., ideas); sense-doors (eye, ear, ..., mind); consciousness at the sense-doors; six contacts(eye-contact, ..., mind-contact); six feelings; six perceptions; six intentions; six cravings; six direct thoughts and evaluations.

****************
Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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yawares
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Daily Dhamma: How to End the Thought 'I Am'

Post by yawares » Sun Jul 15, 2012 5:29 am

Dear Members,

:candle: Daily Dhamma: How to End the Thought 'I Am' :candle:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri@ SariputtaDhamma/JTN/Mult]

Perceiving a person on a TV screen, is a perception-phenomenon that originates
from clinging [upaadana = clinging to sensuality, clinging to views <including
self views>, and clinging to mere rules and ritual]. Does an arahant who has no
clinging see an empty TV screen? No, I think an arahant sees the same visible
form and hear the same sounds as we do; the only big difference is that there is
no upaadana in him or her to cause the perception of a 'Self'(attaa) smiling and
talking.

It is more important to know how we may develop higher wisdom that leads to
perception of 'anatta'(not-self) both internally and externally. Of the several
suttas I have studied, the Khemo Sutta explains most directly and clearly (the
Pali words are mine):

[Venerable Khemaka:]

"Though, friends, an Ariyan disciple has abandoned the five lower fetters, there
still remains in him a subtle remnant from among the five groups of clinging, a
subtle remnant of the 'I'-conceit, of the 'I'-desire, an unextirpated lurking
tendency to think: 'I am.'

"Later on he dwells contemplating the rise and fall of the five groups of
clinging, and he sees: 'This is the body ['iti rupa.m'], this is its arising
['iti rupassa samudayo'], this is its passing away ['iti rupassa atthangamo'].
These are feelings(vedana),... perceptions(sa~n~na),... mental
formations(sankhara),... this is consciousness(vi~n~nana), this is its arising,
this is its passing away.'

"So, as he dwells thus in contemplation of the rise and fall of the five groups
of clinging, this subtle remnant from among the five groups of clinging, this
subtle remnant of the 'I'-conceit, of the 'I'-desire, this unextirpated lurking
tendency to think: 'I am' is brought to an end. [SN 22.89 Khemo Sutta. Walshe
translates.]
------
Note: the five lower fetters are: self-identity views(sakkaya-ditthi),
uncertainty(vicikiccha), grasping at precepts &
practices(sílabbata-parámása), sensual desire(káma-rága), and ill
will(vyápáda).
**************
Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

pegembara
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Re: Daily Dhamma: How to End the Thought 'I Am'

Post by pegembara » Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:55 am

How about this one?
"What do you think, Malunkyaputta: the forms cognizable via the eye that are unseen by you — that you have never before seen, that you don't see, and that are not to be seen by you: Do you have any desire or passion or love there?"

"No, lord."[1]

"The sounds cognizable via the ear...

"The aromas cognizable via the nose...

"The flavors cognizable via the tongue...

"The tactile sensations cognizable via the body...

"The ideas cognizable via the intellect that are uncognized by you — that you have never before cognized, that you don't cognize, and that are not to be cognized by you: Do you have any desire or passion or love there?"

"No, lord."

"Then, Malunkyaputta, with regard to phenomena to be seen, heard, sensed, or cognized: In reference to the seen, there will be only the seen. In reference to the heard, only the heard. In reference to the sensed, only the sensed. In reference to the cognized, only the cognized. That is how you should train yourself. When for you there will be only the seen in reference to the seen, only the heard in reference to the heard, only the sensed in reference to the sensed, only the cognized in reference to the cognized, then, Malunkyaputta, there is no you in connection with that. When there is no you in connection with that, there is no you there. When there is no you there, you are neither here nor yonder nor between the two. This, just this, is the end of stress."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.

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yawares
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Re: Daily Dhamma: How to End the Thought 'I Am'

Post by yawares » Sun Jul 15, 2012 12:34 pm

pegembara wrote:How about this one?
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
[/quote]
Dear pegembara,

Oh so very beautiful quote, I love it.
yawares

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:20 am

Dear Members,

Image

:candle: Old, New, and Cessation of Kamma :candle:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


We all want cessation of any bad kamma. But only a few of us, perhaps, care about cessation of ALL kamma.
This wonderful Sutta SN 35.145 is a "must-study" for every Buddhist.
...................

SN 35.145 Kamma.m Sutta: Kamma translated from the Pali by Maurice O'Connell Walshe

"Monks, I will teach you about new kamma and old kamma, about the ceasing of kamma and the path that leads to the ceasing of kamma. Listen well, pay close attention and I will speak.

"What, monks, is old kamma?
"The eye [ear, nose tongue, body (touch), mind],[1] monks, is to be regarded as old kamma, brought into existence and created by volition,[2] forming a basis for feeling.[3] This, monks, is called 'old kamma.'

"And what, monks, is new kamma?
"The action[4] one performs now by body, speech and mind. This monks, is called 'new kamma.'

"When, monks, by ceasing actions of body, speech and mind, one touches liberation,[5] this, monks, is called 'the ceasing of kamma.'

"And what, monks, is the path that leads to the ceasing of kamma?

"It is the Noble Eightfold Path, namely Right View, Right Thought, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration. This, monks, is called 'the path that leads to the ceasing of kamma.'

Notes

1. Woodward quotes SA [SN commentary] as correctly pointing out that "Eye in itself is not old but it has come about by former actions [i.e., kamma.]"
2. Cf. the classic definition of kamma at AN 6.63: 'cetanaaha.m bhikkhave kamma.m vadaami' "volition, monks, I declare to be kamma" (see A.nguttara Nikaaya: An Anthology translated by Nyaa.naponika Thera, Part II [WH 208-211], p.67).
3. Vedaniiya.m. Hence a basis for craving etc.
4. The same word kamma is used in the Pali.
5. This is really the Third Noble Truth.
6. The word here is kammanta. Right Action is specifically the observance of the first three precepts, i.e., abstaining from killing, theft and sexual misconduct.
7. Kammanirodha-gaaminii-pa.tipadaa. The usual term for the Path is dukkhanirodha-gaaminii-pa.tipadaa "the path (or practice) that leads to the extinction of suffering." Here the link between kamma and dukkha is clearly brought out. Those who have attained the goal do not create even good kamma.

***********
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Wed Feb 20, 2013 1:19 pm

Dear Members,

Image

I wish metors fell somewhere in the Texas desert..I wish meteors carried some exotic/beautiful space gems inside too...meteors can be heavenly gifts from Sakka himself:jumping:

*************
:heart: Daily Dhamma: Patience :heart:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]

1. Patience is the 27th of the 38 Highest Blessings (Mahamangala): "Patience is the foundation of metta (loving-kindness). It is reckoned as a great power; and the strength of those who have patience is often praised in Buddhist writings."
"Patience is an excellent quality much praised in Buddhist scriptures. It can be developed easily only if restlessness and hatred have already been subdued in the mind, as is done by meditation practice." ...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... 6.html#ch4" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2. [Dhammapada XIV, 184: Awakened:]

"Enduring patience is the highest austerity.
'Nibbana is supreme,' say the Buddhas.
He is not a true monk who harms another, nor a true renunciate who oppresses others.

3. A Treatise on the Paaramiis, The All-Embracing Net of Views, translated from the Pali (Cariyaapi.taaka A.t.thakathaa) by Bhikkhu Bodhi: "Patience has the characteristic of acceptance; its function is to endure the desirable and undesirable; its manifestation is tolerance or non-opposition; seeing things as they really are is its proximate cause.

"Patience is mentioned immediately after energy:
(a) because patience is perfected by energy (Viriya), as it is said: "The energetic man, by arousing his energy, overcomes the suffering imposed by beings and formations";
(b) because patience is an adornment of energy, as it is said: "The patience of the energetic man shines with splendor";
(c) in order to state the causal basis for serenity immediately after the basis for exertion, for restlessness due to excessive activity is abandoned through reflective acquiescence in the Dhamma;
(d) in order to show the perseverance of the man of energy, since one who is patient and free from restlessness perseveres in his work;
(e) in order to show the absence of craving for rewards in a Bodhisattva diligently engaged in activity for the welfare of others, for there is no craving when he reflects on the Dhamma in accordance with actuality; and
(f) to show that the Bodhisattva must patiently endure the suffering created by others even when he is working to the utmost for their welfare.

******
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:54 pm

Dear Members,

Image

Daily Dhamma: Integrity
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


One of the four factors for Stream-entry is Association with People of Integrity.

[SN 55.5:] Association with people of integrity is a factor for stream-entry.
Listening to the true Dhamma is a factor for stream-entry.
Appropriate attention is a factor for stream-entry.
Practice in accordance with the Dhamma is a factor for stream-entry.

How is "integrity" defined?

[AN 2.31:] "A person of no integrity is ungrateful, does not acknowledge the help given to him. This ingratitude, this lack of acknowledgment is second nature among rude people. It is entirely on the level of people of no integrity. A person of integrity is grateful & acknowledges the help given to him. This gratitude, this acknowledgment is second nature among admirable people. It is entirely on the level of people of integrity."

Being grateful for, and acknowledging, a help is not the only characteristic of a person of integrity!

[AN 4.73:] "There is the case where a person of integrity, when asked, doesn't reveal another person's bad points, to say nothing of when unasked. Furthermore, when asked, when pressed with questions, he is one who speaks of another person's bad points not in full, not in detail, with omissions, holding back...

"Then again, a person of integrity, when unasked, reveals another person's good points, to say nothing of when asked. Furthermore, when asked, when pressed with questions, he is one who speaks of another person's good points in full & in detail, without omissions, without holding back...

"Then again, a person of integrity, when unasked, reveals his own bad points, to say nothing of when asked. Furthermore, when asked, when pressed with questions, he is one who speaks of his own bad points in full & in detail, without omissions, without holding back...

"Then again, a person of integrity, when asked, doesn't reveal his own good points, to say nothing of when unasked. Furthermore, when asked, when pressed with questions, he is one who speaks of his own good points not in full, not in detail, with omissions, holding back...

"Monks, a person endowed with these four qualities can be known as 'a person of integrity."

***********
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Tue Feb 26, 2013 4:14 pm

Dear Members,

Yesterday was the full-moon Magha Puja Day/Uposatha Day, I listened to many beautiful chantings...Oh I love this video clip : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvWGpNDBg4I" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Namo Tassa: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lm1Oa31xYUQ" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

*************
Nutriments for Patience to Grow
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SD/JTN]


When there is hatred, it is hard to be patient. With a theme of resistance (pa.tigha nimitta) that has not been anandoned, it is hard to subdue anger that tends to quickly arise when one senses a displeasure.

Question: What dhamma should be practiced in order to develop strong patience? Is loving-kindness sufficient to nourish growth of patience and also eradicate resistance? I think there is an underlying tendency known as Pa.tighaanusayassa that cannot be destroyed by the practice of metta in ordinary people.

"Khantii: this important virtue, in fact one of the highest, can be translated as patience but it includes the virtues of forbearance, forgiveness and tolerance. It finds expression as a serene attitude towards stresses in oneself and outside, which enables a person to accept with equanimity the flow of events. Because of this the impressions entering the mind from the sense doors cannot upset the peace reigning there, so one goes on serenely with the work in hand. Though all sorts of upsetting situations occur and send their disturbing messages to the mind, it does not become heated. In fact with even a little of this virtue the mind becomes cool, clean and calm, like a refreshing pool of crystal clear water, quite unlike the minds of most people which can rightly be compared to a pot of boiling soup or a cup of water with swirls of color in it. ... we have to encounter heat and cold, hunger and thirst, various insects and so on which attack this body, and the sharp words of others which seem to attack the ego; then there are occasions for being patient about time, and how many times for being patient with the frailties of other people? But the basis of all patience is to be patient with oneself."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el254.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So, patience has to be directly developed. One has to give patience a nutriment that conditions its growth. The above quoted passage indicates that the nutriment for patience is the intention to be patient with oneself and others. Yoniso-manasikaara to guard the sense doors is another nutriment for patience, I believe. What do you think?

*************
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma
yawares/tidathep :heart:

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Sun Mar 03, 2013 2:26 pm

Dear Members,

The Lotus-like Lay-follower
[— AN 5.175]

Thus spoke the Buddha:

A lay-follower (upasaka) who has five qualities is a jewel of a lay-follower, is like a lily, like a lotus. What are these five qualities? He has faith; he is virtuous; he is not superstitious; he believes in action (kamma) and not in luck or omen; he does not seek outside (of the Order) for those worthy of support and does not attend there first.
-----------
Ten Virtues of the Lay-follower
[— Milindapañha, Ch. IV]

These ten, great King, are the virtues of the lay-follower:

1.He shares the joys and sorrows of the Order;[1]

2.He places the Dhamma first;[2]

3.He enjoys giving according to his ability;

4.If he sees a decline in the Dispensation of the Teaching of the Buddha, he strives for its strong growth;

5.He has right views, disregarding belief in superstitions and omens; he will not accept any other teacher, not even for the sake of his life;

6.He guards his deeds and words;

7.He loves and cherishes peace and concord;

8.He is not envious or jealous;

9.He does not live a Buddhist life by way of deception or hypocrisy;

10.He has gone for refuge to the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha.

********
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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yawares
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Re: Yawares Daily Dhamma Thread

Post by yawares » Fri Mar 08, 2013 3:14 pm

Dear Members,

Image

Whenever I slip, stumble, fall...I always bounce back just like a 'DARUMA DOLL'...all because I have true 'KALAYANAMITTAs' to help me along the long long long... very long highway to NIBBANA, the Buddhas' city!

************

Seven Types of Buddhists
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SD/JTN]


Here is a summary of the key ideas in the Udakupama Sutta on the seven kinds of individuals.

Udakupama Sutta (AN 7.15) emphasizes the utmost importance of five kinds of wholesome (kusala dhammas) that are necessary for successful self-awakening (beginning at Stream-entry) -- not "falling away" in the Dhamma again. Falling away in the Dhamma is comparable to sinking down into a deep water.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

There are seven cases of individual as described in AN 7.15:
1. He/she sinks down and stays sunk: this individual is endowed with unwholesome qualities.
2. He/she come up to the surface only once, then sinks down again! The five dhammas: conviction, conscience, concern, persistence, discernment simply wane away.
3. An individual, on coming to the surface, stays there. The five qualities do not wane, but develop and remain.
4. "And how does an individual, on coming to the surface, open his eyes & look around? There is the case where an individual comes to the surface, seeing: 'Conviction in skillful qualities is good, conscience is good, concern is good, persistence is good, discernment with regard to skillful qualities is good.' With the total ending of [the first] three fetters, he becomes a stream-winner, steadfast, never again destined for states of woe, headed for self-awakening."
5. An individual, on coming to the surface, heads across the water: he/she becomes a once-returner, who — on returning only one more time to this world — will make an ending to stress.
6. An individual, on coming to the surface, gains a foothold: he/she becomes non-returner with the total ending of the five lower fetters.
7. An individual, on coming to the surface, cross over, reach the far shore, stand on high ground: he/she becomes an arahant.

Notes:

1. Siila in the sense of 'restraint and non-transgression' keeps the mind with kusala dhammas such as hiri-ottappa (moral shame and moral dread:— the "guardians of the world"), indriya-samvara (sense-door restraint), sati (mindfulness) and nekkhamma (freedom from sensual lust). Without unbroken siila one will sink back again into the sea of unwholesome behaviors.

2. 'Sappurisa' in general means a good, worthy person of merit and good character. But, in MN 110 'sappurisa dhammaa' denotes Saddha(conviction), Hiri(conscience), Ottappa(concern), Bahussuta(very learned), Viriya(energy, persistence), Sati(mindfulness), and Pa~n~naa(wisdom, discernment). These seven dhammas are the learner qualities.
The seven sappurisa dhammas are well developed by a Sekha (trainer, learner) as explained in Sekha-patipada Sutta. Interestingly, just five of the seven sapurissa-dhammas are requisites for Stream-entry, i.e., Saddha, Viriya, Hiri, Ottappa, and Pa~n~naa.

******
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:

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