moral situations

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
chris98e
Posts: 131
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 12:52 am

Re: moral situations

Post by chris98e » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:10 am

Moth wrote:Is the first percept "I undertake the precept to abstain from killing living beings...unless in self defense"?
No. The first precept is "I undertake the precept to abstain from killing living beings."
Sorry I'm not the perfect Buddhist you are Moth. By the way Moth you have a picture of a Monk next to your name are you a monk? Just wondering. :buddha2:

befriend
Posts: 1276
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:39 am

Re: moral situations

Post by befriend » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:33 am

some people have wonderful intentions, but they still make akusala kamma. take for example ascetics who abuse there bodies or animal sacrifices. good intentions there, not wholesome in the slightest. WISDOM and compassion.
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.

chris98e
Posts: 131
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 12:52 am

Re: moral situations

Post by chris98e » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:19 am

befriend wrote:some people have wonderful intentions, but they still make akusala kamma. take for example ascetics who abuse there bodies or animal sacrifices. good intentions there, not wholesome in the slightest. WISDOM and compassion.
I don't think that I make akusala kamma through my intentions. There is of course a fine line between right and wrong. Just like there is a fine line between argued and completely justified. In the gun situation. "A guy is carrying a gun for protection. He's walking down the street. A robber comes and tries to stick him up with his own gun. The first guy shoots with mugger. Was he wrong or right. I think he shouldn't have been carrying a gun to begin with. But it can be argued that he was right for shooting the mugger." To say that the guy is tottaly wrong for shooting the mugger is a bit harsh. An example is in the Samaññaphala Sutta: The Fruits of the Contemplative Life. The Buddha says at the end: "The king is wounded, monks. The king is incapacitated. Had he not killed his father — that righteous man, that righteous king — the dustless, stainless Dhamma eye would have arisen to him as he sat in this very seat." He doesn't say that he was wrong or right for doing it he just talks about the facts. Now this is a situation where it didn't even seem like there is a strong case for the King to kill is father it seem to me the only two being accedental and self-defense. Also, I'm not the one arguing the justification of the mugger being shot. But I'm sure there are people who would argue that case. And do you call them crazy? Probably not.

chris98e
Posts: 131
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 12:52 am

Re: moral situations

Post by chris98e » Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:56 pm

chris98e wrote:But it can be argued that he was right for shooting the mugger.
Or maybe it can't be. I don't know. I think the likely hood of me carrying a gun from now to the next 20 years is pretty low. So, i'll never be in that situation. I would end up giving up my money in that situation. haha. :reading:

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