dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

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danieLion
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by danieLion » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:12 am

chownah wrote:I think if one is not attached to conflict then one does not experience dukkha thereby.
I think if one is attached to resolution then one does expereince dukkha thereby.
chownah
Hi chownah,
Why separate dukkha from conflict experientially? Is not the experience of conflict stressful? Is not the experience of the resolution of conflict liberating?

By "attachment" do you mean upadana?

D :heart:

danieLion
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by danieLion » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:15 am

Spiny O'Norman wrote:
SilvioB wrote: Dukkha is fighting & resisting change.
That's a good way of putting it, and the Buddha did say that whatever is impermanent is unsatisfactory.

Spiny
Fighting fair is a skillful use of anicca properly understood.
D :heart:

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Spiny O'Norman
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by Spiny O'Norman » Wed Dec 21, 2011 10:31 am

danieLion wrote:
Spiny O'Norman wrote:
SilvioB wrote: Dukkha is fighting & resisting change.
That's a good way of putting it, and the Buddha did say that whatever is impermanent is unsatisfactory.

Spiny
Fighting fair is a skillful use of anicca properly understood.
D :heart:
Do you mean working with change? Could you maybe give some examples?

Spiny

chownah
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by chownah » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:36 pm

danieLion wrote:
chownah wrote:I think if one is not attached to conflict then one does not experience dukkha thereby.
I think if one is attached to resolution then one does expereince dukkha thereby.
chownah
Hi chownah,
Why separate dukkha from conflict experientially? Is not the experience of conflict stressful? Is not the experience of the resolution of conflict liberating?

By "attachment" do you mean upadana?

D :heart:
danieLion,
Just as a hint of a reply.....just the tip of the iceburg of a reply is that conflict is fun!!!!....after all that is why you responded to my post!!!!.....I guess.....but I don't know for sure.....maybe I'm wrong.....that's why people enjoy sports!!!!....I guess.....but I don't know for sure....that's why people like to get married!!!....I guess....but I don't know for sure.....that's why Steve Job's enjoyed being the CEO of Apple....I guess....but I don't know for sure.....
chownah
P.S. Upadana? No speeka da Pali.
chownah
P.P.S. Is there any connection between Dukkha and attachment? (Yes, this is a pun but it is also a serious question.)
chownah

danieLion
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by danieLion » Thu Dec 22, 2011 3:58 am

danieLion wrote:Fighting fair is a skillful use of anicca properly understood.
Spiny O'Norman wrote: Do you mean working with change? Could you maybe give some examples?
Hey Bristly,
Resisting change is futile. Better to work with it.
Fight fair/working with change examples: Robert's Rules of Order, consensus (discourse ethics), the legal system, mediation, arbitration, contracts, agreeing to refrain from things like name-calling and ad hominem attacks, vipassana, anapanasati, bramavihara contemplation, sila, being nice, friendly, affectionate, etc....

Add some more of your own.
D :heart:

danieLion
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by danieLion » Thu Dec 22, 2011 4:14 am

chownah wrote:I think if one is not attached to conflict then one does not experience dukkha thereby. I think if one is attached to resolution then one does expereince dukkha thereby.
danieLion wrote:Why separate dukkha from conflict experientially? Is not the experience of conflict stressful? Is not the experience of the resolution of conflict liberating?

By "attachment" do you mean upadana?
chownah wrote:Just as a hint of a reply.....just the tip of the iceburg of a reply is that conflict is fun!!!!....after all that is why you responded to my post!!!!.....I guess.....but I don't know for sure.....maybe I'm wrong.....that's why people enjoy sports!!!!....I guess.....but I don't know for sure....that's why people like to get married!!!....I guess....but I don't know for sure.....that's why Steve Job's enjoyed being the CEO of Apple....I guess....but I don't know for sure.....
chownah
:lol: But we all know what fun always becomes, right?
chownah wrote:P.S. Upadana? No speeka da Pali.
Clinging.
chownah wrote:P.P.S. Is there any connection between Dukkha and attachment? (Yes, this is a pun but it is also a serious question.)
I don't know what you mean by "attachment," but my sense is that dukkha is related to "attachment" as contact/feelings/craving/clinging/becoming. But is based more on my experience of these aspects of dependent origination rather than a commentary on how I relate to "attachment."
D :heart:

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Spiny O'Norman
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Re: dukkha as Conflict, nirodha as Resolution

Post by Spiny O'Norman » Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:41 am

danieLion wrote:
danieLion wrote:Fighting fair is a skillful use of anicca properly understood.
Spiny O'Norman wrote: Do you mean working with change? Could you maybe give some examples?
Hey Bristly,
Resisting change is futile. Better to work with it.
Fight fair/working with change examples: Robert's Rules of Order, consensus (discourse ethics), the legal system, mediation, arbitration, contracts, agreeing to refrain from things like name-calling and ad hominem attacks, vipassana, anapanasati, bramavihara contemplation, sila, being nice, friendly, affectionate, etc....

Add some more of your own.
D :heart:
Currently I feel I'm pre-occupied with trying to accept change. ;)

Spiny

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