Fifth precept

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
jackson
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by jackson » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:36 am

Greetings JackV, :smile:
I've found that if I'm attached to something it's around the two years of abstaining mark that I really get perspective and can decide if it's worth indulging myself. So anyway, I'd recommend making a determination to give up alcohol for an extended period of time. It may or may not be easy, but you may find that once it's out of your system you'll actually be turned off by the idea of intoxication, at least that was the case for me when I quit using intoxicants, these days I wouldn't trade sobriety for the world. Anyway, I hope my advice helps.
May you be well, happy, peaceful, and free from suffering, :smile:
Jackson
"The heart of the path is quite easy. There’s no need to explain anything at length. Let go of love and hate and let things be. That’s all that I do in my own practice." - Ajahn Chah

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Kim OHara
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Kim OHara » Wed Aug 31, 2011 5:16 am

Jason wrote:
PeterB wrote:I always end up feeling in these debates that I play the role of the Defender Of Alcohol.. :smile:
...
I think we have to decide for ourselves where on the spectrum from total abstinence to drinking within our personal limits lies.
I more or less share PeterB's sentiments (e.g., see this).
I'm with you guys. :smile:
I don't drink much, and don't want to, but (for me, at least) a glass of wine with dinner is no worse for me in any way than a couple of chocolates afterwards: minor indulgences with no consequences. If I could find another drink that I enjoyed as much with food, I would probably switch, but finding such an alternative is a fair way down my list of 'things which would make me a better person' so I may not get around to it for years.

:meditate:
Kim

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by PeterB » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:29 am

octathlon wrote:If you have no addiction or attachment to alcohol, the 5th precept should be the easiest one of all to follow. So why not just do that, regardless of whether you perceive drinking as affecting your mindfulness or not. It seems like the Buddha must have considered it to be pretty important, to put in the top 5. (Or, maybe it was just meant for some people, the ones whose mindfulness is affected by it? Let's see if I can find where it says that in the Suttas... :reading: )
If you do then you do find anything in the Suttas, then apply it to yourself. You will not find anthing that I havent considered.
Even if you found a Sutta passage that says " and in particular PeterB should not have an occasional glass of wine " I would still reserve the right to form my own judgement thank you Shakyamuni, as I am not you and you are not me.And you live in an ancient culture which in general terms is life negative. And you are not a god.
Now, please tell me what you think about the Bhumis. Thats your forte.

:anjali:

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Ruralist
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Ruralist » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:18 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
JackV wrote:Has anyone else made that step from enjoying drink to tee total? If so, is it easy/hard, do you have to change your life about or just be strong and continue?
Like most young men in the UK, I was a regular drinker from the age of 17-21 or so, and not just at weekends. When I started studying Buddhism and meditation, I soon realised that drinking any alcohol was incompatible with following the Buddhist path seriously. I knew that getting intoxicated was just running away from the truth of suffering. Within a week or two I had stopped drinking completely, and have never taken any alcohol since — except maybe the odd chocolate liqueur that I don't notice had alcohol in it before biting it. That was some 37 years ago. It was not difficult to stop, but it very soon became apparent that it was pointless going to the pub with my mates.

If you don't want to be a monk, then its better to visit meditation centres, Buddhist temples, and places of learning, rather than pubs and clubs. You're much more likely to meet a suitable marriage partner in such places. To be married to a non-Buddhist or non-meditator, who likes to drink and party in the western way is always likely to cause problems later in life because you have different values and aims in life, so why go to places that only the heedless enjoy?

Instead of wasting half of your money on alcohol and expensive junk food, invest it in education and learning life skills that will help you in your chosen career.
this is one of the problems i have faced
"Let monkeys be monkeys without getting emotionally involved. Peace can be born within you because you know the way monkeys are. Knowing the manner of monkeys, you will let go and be at peace, not getting tied up in monkey business." Ven. Ajahn Chah

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Epistemes
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Epistemes » Wed Aug 31, 2011 6:07 pm

I came to the realization that my drinking buddies were not really my friends at all. Sure, we'd play pool, share some jokes, maybe even catch a live band or something, but there was never any real bonding. I soon realized that they could take me or leave me depending on my drinking schedule.

I'm not saying this is everyone's situation, but if you can't have interaction with your (drinking) buddies outside of drinking, then they're not your friends and you're better off alone anyway. This loneliness is a perfect time to judge your motivation to truly practice the dhamma.

Friends come and go. All relationships are impermanent, and so are the effects of alcohol.
The wind spins without end,
one moment southward,
the next moment northward.

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by PeterB » Wed Aug 31, 2011 6:32 pm

A good illustration of the fact that there is a whole dimension that whoever invented the precepts could not have envisaged.
Personally I have never had any drinking buddies, The concept is completely alien to me.
Myself and some of my friends including Buddhist ones have been known to have a glass of vino with dinner with family or friends.
Would they count as drinking buddies ?

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Mawkish1983 » Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:59 pm

PeterB wrote:A good illustration of the fact that there is a whole dimension that whoever invented the precepts could not have envisaged.
I mean absolutely no disrespect here, PeterB, but in my opinion 'whoever invented the precepts' was much further along the path than you or I, so it's wise to trust their advice.

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cooran
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by cooran » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:21 pm

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Jason wrote:
PeterB wrote:I always end up feeling in these debates that I play the role of the Defender Of Alcohol.. :smile:
...
I think we have to decide for ourselves where on the spectrum from total abstinence to drinking within our personal limits lies.
I more or less share PeterB's sentiments (e.g., see this).
I'm with you guys. :smile:
I don't drink much, and don't want to, but (for me, at least) a glass of wine with dinner is no worse for me in any way than a couple of chocolates afterwards: minor indulgences with no consequences. If I could find another drink that I enjoyed as much with food, I would probably switch, but finding such an alternative is a fair way down my list of 'things which would make me a better person' so I may not get around to it for years.

:meditate:
Kim
Hello all,

I'm wondering if someone can point to a Sutta where total abstinence at all times is required. I can see it is part of the Uposatha Day ceremony - but can anyone point to where having a glass of wine/other alcohol on a weekly, fortnightly or monthly basis at a dinner is forbidden?

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

Mawkish1983
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Mawkish1983 » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:38 pm

Furthermore, abandoning the use of intoxicants, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking intoxicants. In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the fifth gift, the fifth great gift — original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & priests. And this is the eighth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.
Abhisanda Sutta: Rewards

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DNS
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by DNS » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:43 pm

cooran wrote: I'm wondering if someone can point to a Sutta where total abstinence at all times is required. I can see it is part of the Uposatha Day ceremony - but can anyone point to where having a glass of wine/other alcohol on a weekly, fortnightly or monthly basis at a dinner is forbidden?
"Furthermore, abandoning the use of intoxicants, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking intoxicants."

Anguttara Nikaya 8.39

The fifth precept, with no indication that it is only for Uposatha Days; recited on those days, but a precept for all times. However, I seem to recall Bhante Dhammanando mentioning once that this sutta or perhaps some others suggested that 'moderation' might be acceptable for those who are not yet noble ones, i.e. puthujjana. But for sotapannas and higher, it is clear that the precepts are kept strongly, with no intentional breaking of any of them.

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by DNS » Wed Aug 31, 2011 9:01 pm

Oops, I didn't see that Mawk already posted the link to AN 8.39

But now I think I remember what Bhante Dhammanando said. I think he said that 'disciple of noble ones' could be interpreted as the ordained Sangha, not necessarily lay people, but that it is somewhat vague. But in any event, lay or ordained, the precepts are pure for sotapanna and higher, which should be motivation enough to abstain most / all the time.

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by Mawkish1983 » Wed Aug 31, 2011 9:10 pm

Does anyone know the original pali word that was translated here as 'disciple'?

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bodom
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by bodom » Wed Aug 31, 2011 9:20 pm

David N. Snyder wrote:Oops, I didn't see that Mawk already posted the link to AN 8.39

But now I think I remember what Bhante Dhammanando said. I think he said that 'disciple of noble ones' could be interpreted as the ordained Sangha, not necessarily lay people, but that it is somewhat vague.
The Buddha was quite clear that his lay disciples who "enjoy worldly pleasure", who are "encumbered by wife and children.", as well as the ordained sangha should abstain from alcohol and intoxicants:
"Venerable sir, in what way is one a lay follower?

"Mahanama, inasmuch as one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge, has gone to the Sangha for refuge; in that way, Mahanama, one is a lay follower."

"Then, venerable sir, in what way is a lay follower virtuous?"

"Mahanama, inasmuch as a lay follower abstains from destroying living beings; abstains from taking what is not given; abstains from sexual misconduct; abstains from lying; and abstains from wine, liquor and intoxicants that are causes for heedlessness; in that way, Mahanama, a lay follower is virtuous."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... html#fnt-1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Lord, to what extent is one a lay follower?"

"Jivaka, when one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge, and has gone to the Sangha for refuge, then to that extent is one a lay follower."

"And to what extent, lord, is one a virtuous lay follower?"

"Jivaka, when one abstains from taking life, from stealing, from sexual misconduct, from lying, and from fermented & distilled drinks that lead to heedlessness, then to that extent is one a virtuous lay follower."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
"We, Lord, are laymen who enjoy worldly pleasure. We lead a life encumbered by wife and children. We use sandalwood of Kasi. We deck ourselves with garlands, perfume and unguents. We use gold and silver. To those like us, O Lord, let the Exalted One preach the Dhamma, teach those things that lead to weal and happiness in this life and to weal and happiness in future life."...."Herein a householder abstains from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, and from intoxicants that cause infatuation and heedlessness. This is called the accomplishment of virtue.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nara.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The Buddha asks us to abstain from alcohol as well as killing, stealing, sexual misconduct and lying. Abstinence means to completely refrain from. Would the Buddha say that it is sometimes OK to kill, steal, lie etc.? Why would this be so with the fifth precept? I don't believe he intended a middle ground with the precepts.

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

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Re: Fifth precept

Post by DNS » Wed Aug 31, 2011 9:31 pm

bodom wrote: "Then, venerable sir, in what way is a lay follower virtuous?"

"Mahanama, inasmuch as a lay follower abstains from destroying living beings; abstains from taking what is not given; abstains from sexual misconduct; abstains from lying; and abstains from wine, liquor and intoxicants that are causes for heedlessness; in that way, Mahanama, a lay follower is virtuous."
Thanks bodom, good finds!

But it mentions "virtuous lay follower". The precepts are not commandments, so technically a "Buddhist" (lay follower) could be non-virtuous. I can't imagine why a lay follower would choose to be non-virtuous though.

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kirk5a
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Re: Fifth precept

Post by kirk5a » Wed Aug 31, 2011 10:23 pm

Mawkish1983 wrote:Does anyone know the original pali word that was translated here as 'disciple'?
"Ariya-sāvaka"
In the traditional Pali commentaries, the Pali term "ariya-sāvaka" is explained as "the disciple of the Noble One (i.e. Buddha)".[10] Accordingly Soma Thera and Thanissaro Bhikkhu translate this term as "The disciple of the Noble Ones" [11]
However Bhikkhu Bodhi interprets this term as "noble disciple", and according to him, in the Pali suttas, this term is used in two ways:[12]
broadly: any lay disciple (Pāli: upasaka, upasika) of the Buddha;
narrowly: one who is at least on the path to enlightenment (Pāli: sotāpatti maggattha). In this sense, "ordinary people" (puthujjana) can be contrasted with this narrow definition of "noble disciple" (ariya-sāvaka).[13]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%9Ar%C4 ... .81vaka.22" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So if this is taken in the narrow sense, it suggests that those who have not abandoned the use of intoxicants are not even on the path to stream entry.
"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230

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