Buddho

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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bodom
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Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:08 pm

For what purpose have we travelled here today, from the towns and the cities both near and far? We have come seeking Buddho - 'the Knower' - or, in other words, to realise this enlightened awareness and awaken our hearts like the Lord Buddha before us. In bringing forth this 'Buddho', or 'awakened awareness', then there is Buddho on the level of sila and Buddho on the level of generosity or dana.
Tan Ajahn Anand Akincano
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

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bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:08 pm

We already know that there is abundant wealth in the world and that· stinginess is blameworthy. However, if we don't use our wealth beneficially, then when we are gone, it's worthless. Everyone is born and dies, and nobody can take with them the assets they have amassed, whether vast wealth or even this physical body; entirely everything must be left behind. If our assets are not used in wholesome and meritorious activities directed towards our spiritual welfare or the benefit of society as a whole, then they have scarcely any value. However, if we are heedful and possessed of Buddho - this awakened awareness - then according to our strength or ability, we can be generous, self-sacrificing and of service to others, whether to our country, our fellows in society or those experiencing accidents and misfortune. In this way we are giving and sharing our happiness with others. This is how we perfect the virtues of dana and caga ­- generosity and self-sacrifice.


Tan Ajahn Anand Akincano

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:10 pm

Therefore, when we come to the practice of Dhamma, we have to abandon ignorance, craving and attachment. We must let go of delusion and cultivate wisdom, establishing the heart in Buddho ­awakened awareness. When possessed of Buddho, the heart is not deluded. The undeluded heart is one possessed of wisdom, and the heart possessed of wisdom is free from suffering.

The awareness that is Buddho begins with a heart that is happy, peaceful and free from stinginess. The Lord Buddha's heart was completely established in Buddho. He further taught that if we aspire to a peaceful, radiant heart or, in other words, if we are determined to realise the genuine, original mind- the mind naturally possessed of purity and peace - then we must ardently meditate.


Tan Ajahn Anand Akincano

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

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Hanzze
Posts: 1906
Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 12:47 pm
Location: Cambodia

Re: Buddho

Post by Hanzze » Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:48 pm

The Chiang Mai Years

Just as Ãcariya Mun foresaw, a village representative arrived that very afternoon to question him: “What are you searching for when you it still with your eyes closed, or pace back and forth?” Ãcariya Mun replied, “I’ve lost my buddho. I’m searching for buddho while sitting and walking.” "What is this buddho? Can we help you find it?”
“Buddho is the most precious gem in the three worlds of existence – a jewel of all-pervading knowledge. If you help me find it, that’ll be excellent. Then we will all see buddho quickly and easily.”
“Has your buddho been missing long?”
“Not long. With your help we’ll find it a lot faster than if I look for it alone.”
“Is buddho something large?”
“Neither large nor small, it’s just the right size for all of us. Whoever finds buddho will become a superior person, able to perceive anything he wishes.”
“Will we be able to see the heavens and the hells?” “Of course. Otherwise, how could we call it superior.”
“What about our dead children, and our dead spouses, can they be seen?”
“You can see anything you want once buddho is yours.”
“Is it very bright?”
“It’s much brighter than hundreds, even thousands, of suns. The sun is not able to illuminate heaven and hell, but buddho can penetrate everywhere, illuminating everything.”
“Can woman and children help search for it too?”
“Everyone can help – men, women, young and old, all can join in the search.”
“This superior buddho, can it protect us from ghosts?”
“Buddho is superior in countless ways. It is superior in the three worlds – kãma-loka, rýpa-loka, arýpa-loka. All three of them must pay homage to buddho. No being anywhere is greater than buddho. Ghosts are very afraid of buddho – they must bow down and worship it. Ghosts are frightened of people who search for buddho too, even though they haven’t found it yet.”
“This buddho jewel, what color is it?”
“It’s a bright, sparkling jewel with countless colors. Buddho is a special asset of the Lord Buddha – a gleaming aggregate of knowledge, not a material thing. The Lord Buddha bequeathed it to us many years ago, but since then it’s gone missing and we no longer know how to find it. But it’s location is not so important. If you’re trying to find it, what’s important is to sit and walk thinking “buddho, buddho, buddho” exclusively within your heart. Keep your attention focused within your body, not letting it wander outside. Fix your awareness firmly on the repetition of “buddho, buddho”. If you can manage to do this, you may even come across buddho before I do.” "How long must we to sit and walk searching for buddho before we find it?” “To begin with, sit or walk for about 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Buddho doesn’t want you to spend too much time searching for it yet. It’s afraid you’ll grow tired and so be unable to keep up with it. Losing interest, you will not want to search anymore. Then you’ll miss it altogether. This is enough to get you started. If I elaborate any further, you won’t remember it all, thus jeopardizing your chances of meeting buddho.”
With these instructions in mind, the villager returned home. He didn’t take leave of Ãcariya Mun in any special way, because that was not the hill tribe custom. Deciding that it was time to go, he simply got up and left. As soon as he arrived at the village, everyone gathered around to hear what had taken place. He explained why Ãcariya Mun sat still with his eyes closed and why he paced back and forth: he was searching for the precious gem buddho and not, as they had presumed, because he was a ‘tiger in disguise’. He then explained Ãcariya Mun’s brief instructions on how to find buddho. Once the villagers knew the method, everyone – from the headman on down to the women and older children – began to practice, mentally repeating “buddho”. Several days later, something truly amazing happened. The Dhamma of the Lord Buddha arose clearly in the heart of one of the villagers. While mentally repeating the word “buddho” over and over again as Ãcariya Mun had suggested, one man in the village found Dhamma: his heart attained a state of peace and calm. A few days earlier, the man had dreamed that Ãcariya Mun was placing a very large, bright-shining candle on top of his head. The moment Ãcariya Mun set the candle on his head, his whole body, from the head on down, was brightly illuminated.He felt overjoyed as the radiance, spreading out around him, illuminated the surrounding area as well. Soon after he attained this state of tranquility, he went to tell Ãcariya Mun about his achievement, and about the amazing dream he had prior to it. Ãcariya Mun then gave him additional instructions on how to proceed with his practice. As it turned out, his progress was very quick: he was soon able to psychically know other people’s thoughts. He informed Ãcariya Mun of this very matter-of-factly in the forthright manner typical of forest people.
Sometime later, this man declared to Ãcariya Mun that he had examined Ãcariya Mun’s citta and had clearly seen its characteristics. Playfully, Ãcariya Mun asked if he could see much evil in his citta.The man answered without hesitation, “Your citta has no focal point whatsoever – only an absolutely incredible radiance shining within.
Your preeminence is unrivaled anywhere in the world. I’ve never seen anything like it. You’ve been here about a year now, why didn’t you teach me about this right from the beginning?” "How could I teach you? You never came to ask me any questions.”
“I didn’t know you were a supreme master. Had I known, I’d have come for sure. Now we all know you’re an extremely clever person. When we came asking you why you sat still with your eyes closed and what you were looking for as you paced back and forth, you told us your buddho was lost and asked us to help you find it. When asked to describe it, you said buddho is a bright, sparkling jewel, but in truth the real buddho is your heart.

More of the story and the in the Biography of âcariya Mun
_/\_
with loving kindness and joy
Last edited by Hanzze on Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_

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bodom
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Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Dec 15, 2010 7:32 pm

Thank you Hanzze! Ive been meaning to include that story but have a character limit on my browser and was not able to post it.

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:29 am

When entering concentration so as to relax the mind, in order to give strength to discernment in its continuing explorations, you should go ahead and really rest — rest in concentration. Enter the calm. Completely stop all thoughts and explorations in the area of discernment. Let the mind settle in and relax. It doesn't have to think or contrive anything at all related to its work. Let the mind rest comfortably by giving it a single preoccupation. If the mind happens to be extremely engrossed in its investigations so that you can't rein it in, use 'buddho'as a means to drag it in. Make the mind stay with 'buddho, buddho, buddho.'Even though the meditation word 'buddho'may be a mental contrivance, it's a contrivance in a single focal idea. Contriving a single focal idea can cause the mind to settle down.
Maha Boowa

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:33 am

For example, if while we are repeating, 'buddho, buddho, buddho,'the mind flashes back to its work because it is engrossed in its unfinished business, we should repeat the meditation word even faster so as not to let the mind go back to its work. In other words, when the mind is at the stage where it is engrossed in its work, we could say that we can't let down our guard, although on this level it's hard to say that the mind lets down its guard. To get nearer the truth, we should say that we can't loosen our grip. To put it simply, we can't loosen our grip. Otherwise the mind will jump back out to work. So at this point we have to be firm with our meditation word. Force the mind to stay with its single preoccupation 'buddho'as a means of reining the mind in. Repeat 'buddho, buddho, buddho'in really close frequency; then 'buddho'and the mind will become one. The heart will be firm and calm down, calm down, relaxing, relaxing, setting aside all its work. The mind will become cool and peaceful.
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:09 am

We are taught to meditate, which is a step higher in refinement. This effort to train ourselves in meditation is a way of self-reliance that is steadily taken onto a firmer and more dependable level. We use a meditation-word as the means to direct and control the heart. For, as the mind is not yet able to sustain itself, we have to rely on the meditation-word as the object to soothe and bring peace and calm. The settling of the mind in "buddho buddho buddho..."is one example of this. It is an object for the heart to occupy itself with, which is correct and right and appropriate to finding refuge in Dhamma.
Ajaan Maha Boowa

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:45 am

Questions and Answers with Ajahn Maha Boowa

Q7 M5: Doing the repetition of “Buddho”, must we do it just on its own or together with
the in-and-out breaths?


A: It is up to each person to do it as he likes. It can be done in three ways:

1) Simply repeat “Buddho, Buddho...” etc., until the citta remains still with Buddho.
2) Repeat “Buddho...” in time with the in-and-out breaths.
3) Meditate “Bud” with the in-breaths and “dho” with the out-breaths. It is important
to depend on mindfulness to know and attend to the work that you have set your citta to
do, and to avoid anticipating the results which you may get from doing the practice.
When mindfulness and the work go along together, the result will come of itself steadily
from the practice of meditation....

If you use one of the parikamma words (Buddho, Dhammo or Sangho) to establish
mindfulness in the citta, your attention must be kept firmly on that parikamma word. If the
mind slips away to think about all sorts of things, you should try to understand what has
happened, and use various techniques, such as rapidly repeating the parikamma word, to
bring your attention back again. Whatever technique or method that enables your heart
to gain peace and calm, and to arouse various skilful means internally, may be considered
to be a right method of training yourself. If the citta becomes calm, then concerns about
time and place do not enter and make contact with the citta. There is just knowing and
dwelling alone, and this is happiness (sukha). Whether you sit for a long time or not,
nothing comes to cause disturbances. Wherever you sit and for however long, nothing
comes into relationship with the citta as long as the citta does not go out and get
entangled with things — and as long as it has Dhamma as the object of attention
(ãrammaõa). This is a state of calm that dwells alone, and there is “self-knowing” right
there at that time. This is called “knowing” by way of meditation (bhãvanã) — or
“knowing” by means of guarding the citta. There is a boundary to knowing and
understanding in this way. This is the initial method for progressing in meditation.

When doing meditation, try to let the citta confine its imagining to the work that you want to promote, such as
“Buddho...Buddho...”, which is the kind of work that causes the citta to become calm.
When you try to do this with interest and with mindfulness in control of the citta, you will
be able to attain a state of calm without being troubled by emotionally disturbing objects.
A heart devoid of disturbing things is happy, calm and peaceful. Calm and happiness of
heart devoid of all emotionally disturbing things is the kind of happiness and security that
we long for the most.

Q2 W1: I understand that the meditation practice of repeating “Buddho” should only be
used when sitting in meditation. Can we use it at other times or not?


A: When you do your work, do you have to use your mind to think about things or not? If
you meditate repeating “Buddho” but the citta goes away thinking about other things,
then no kind of meditation is of any use. So in doing any kind of meditation, if
mindfulness is present with the heart so that you can keep the meditation object in mind
the whole time, you will be able to use that meditation object any time. In this regard,
there is no prohibition for those who are interested in training themselves.

Q2 W1: When we meditate using “Buddho”, is it necessary to be seated in meditation?

A: You can do it in all postures. The Lord Buddha did not teach people in order to put
them into a tight fix when they are struggling with their kilesas. He taught people to use
skill and cleverness so as to always be victorious. We should therefore search for clever
ways to be the victor, following the Lord.

The Dhamma that I have explained to you here is ninety-five percent Forest Dhamma.
I have explained the importance of meditation as a means of keeping the focus of the citta
within, so please don’t let the citta go out externally. By nature the citta likes to focus
outwardly. Constantly doing the “Buddho” meditation can help a great deal in curing this
problem.
:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:34 pm

Ajaan Sao's Teaching



In our day and age, the practice of going into the forest to meditate and follow the ascetic dhutanga practices began with Phra Ajaan Sao Kantasilo, the teacher of Phra Ajaan Mun and, by extension, Phra Ajaan Singh and Phra Ajaan Lee. Phra Ajaan Sao was inclined to be, not a preacher or a speaker, but a doer. When he taught his students, he said very little. And those who studied directly under him are now elders who speak very little, who rarely preach, having picked up the habit from their teacher. Thus, as Phra Ajaan Sao was not a preacher, I would like to tell you a little of the way in which he taught meditation.

How did Phra Ajaan Sao teach? If it so happened that someone came to him, saying, "Ajaan, sir, I want to practice meditation. How should I go about it?" he would answer, "Meditate on the word 'Buddho.'"

If the person asked, "What does 'Buddho' mean?" Ajaan Sao would answer, "Don't ask."

"What will happen after I've meditated on 'Buddho'?"

"Don't ask. Your only duty is simply to repeat the word 'Buddho' over and over in your mind."

That's how he taught: no long, drawn-out explanations.

Now, if the student was sincere in putting the Ajaan's instructions into practice and was persistent in practicing the repetition, if his mind then became calm and bright from entering into concentration, he would come and ask Ajaan Sao: "When meditating on 'Buddho' my state of mind becomes such-and-such. What should I do now?" If it was right, Ajaan Sao would say, "Keep on meditating." If not, he would say, "You have to do such-and-such. What you're doing isn't right."

For example, once when I was his attendant novice, a senior monk of the Mahanikaya sect came and placed himself under his direction as a beginning student in meditation. Ajaan Sao taught him to meditate on "Buddho." Now, when the monk settled down on "Buddho," his mind became calm and, once it was calm, bright. And then he stopped repeating "Buddho." At this point, his mind was simply blank. Afterwards, he sent his attention out, following the brightness, and a number of visions began to arise: spirits of the dead, hungry ghosts, divine beings, people, animals, mountains, forests.... Sometimes it seemed as if he, or rather, his mind, left his body and went wandering through the forest and wilderness, seeing the various things mentioned above. Afterwards, he went and told Ajaan Sao, "When I mediated down to the point were the mind became calm and bright, it then went out, following the bright light. Visions of ghosts, divine beings, people, and animals appeared. Sometimes it seemed as if I went out following the visions."

As soon as Ajaan Sao heard this, he said, "This isn't right. For the mind to go knowing and seeing outside isn't right. You have to make it know inside."

The monk then asked, "How should I go about making it know inside?"

Phra Ajaan Sao answered, "When the mind is in a bright state like that, when it has forgotten or abandoned its repetition and is simply sitting empty and still, look for the breath. If the sensation of the breath appears in your awareness, focus on the breath as your object and then simply keep track of it, following it inward until the mind becomes even calmer and brighter."

And so the monk followed the Ajaan's instructions until finally the mind settled down in threshold concentration (upacara samadhi), following which the breath became more and more refined, ultimately to the point where it disappeared. His sensation of having a body also disappeared, leaving just the state in which the mind was sitting absolutely still, a state of awareness itself standing out clear, with no sense of going forward or back, no sense of where the mind was, because at that moment there was just the mind, all on its own. At this point, the monk came again to ask, "After my mind has become calm and bright, and I fix my attention on the breath and follow the breath inward until it reaches a state of being absolutely quiet and still -- so still that nothing is left, the breath doesn't appear, the sense of having a body vanishes, only the mind stands out, brilliant and still: When it's like this, is it right or wrong?"

"Whether it's right or wrong," the Ajaan answered, "take that as your standard. Make an effort to be able to do this as often as possible, and only when you're skilled at it should you come and see me again."

So the monk followed the Ajaan's instructions and later was able to make his mind still to the point that there was no sense of having a body and the breath disappeared more and more often. He became more and more skilled, and his mind became more and more firm. Eventually, after he had been making his mind still very frequently -- because as a rule, there's the principle that virtue develops concentration, concentration develops discernment, discernment develops the mind -- when his concentration became powerful and strong, it gave rise to abhiñña -- heightened knowledge and true insight. Knowledge of what? Knowledge of the true nature of the mind, that is, knowing the states of the mind as they occur in the present. Or so he said.

After he had left this level of concentration and came to see Ajaan Sao, he was told, "This level of concentration is fixed penetration (appana samadhi). You can rest assured that in this level of concentration there is no insight or knowledge of anything at all. There's only the brightness and the stillness. If the mind is forever in that state, it will be stuck simply on that level of stillness. So once you've made the mind still like this, watch for the interval where it begins to stir out of its concentration. As soon as the mind has a sense that it's beginning to take up an object -- no matter what object may appear first -- focus on the act of taking up an object. That's what you should examine."

The monk followed the Ajaan's instructions and afterwards he was able to make fair progress in the level of his mind.

This is one instance of how Phra Ajaan Sao taught his pupils -- teaching just a little at a time, giving only the very heart of the practice, almost as if he would say, "Do this, and this, and this," with no explanations at all. Sometimes I would wonder about his way of teaching. That is, I would compare it with books I had read or with the Dhamma-talks I heard given by other teachers. For example, Phra Ajaan Singh wrote a small handbook for the practice of meditation, entitled, Taking the Triple Refuge and the Techniques of Meditation, and in it he said that in practicing meditation you must, before all else, sit with your body straight and establish mindfulness directly in front of you. That's how he put it, but not how Ajaan Sao would put it. Still, the principles they taught were one and the same, the only difference being that Ajaan Sao was not a preacher, and so didn't make use of a lot of rhetoric.

As he explained to me: "When we make up our mind to repeat 'Buddho,' the act of making up the mind is in itself the act of establishing mindfulness. When we keep thinking 'Buddho' and are not willing to let the mind slip away from 'Buddho,' our mindfulness and alertness are already healthy and strong, always watching over the mind to keep it with 'Buddho.' As soon as our attention slips away, so that we forget to think 'Buddho' and go thinking of something else, it's a sign that there's a lapse in our mindfulness. But if we can keep our mindfulness under control and can think 'Buddho, Buddho' continuously, with no gaps, our mindfulness is already strong, so there's no need to go 'establishing mindfulness' anywhere. To think of an object so that it is coupled with the mind is, in and of itself, the act of getting mindfulness established." That was how he explained it to me.

This was one instance of how I saw and heard Phra Ajaan Sao teaching meditation, and should be enough to serve us all as food for thought.
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Mon May 02, 2011 9:35 pm

"One who is aroused to practice is one of conviction, not without conviction. One aroused to practice is one with persistence aroused, not lazy. One aroused to practice is one of established mindfulness, not muddled mindfulness. One aroused to practice is centered in concentration, not uncentered. One aroused to practice is discerning, not undiscerning.

"Established in these five qualities, you should further develop six qualities:

"There is the case where you recollect the Tathagata: 'Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened [Buddho], blessed.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the Tathagata, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the Tathagata. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

"Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the Buddha while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.
http://www.dhammawheel.com/posting.php? ... =17&t=2552" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Thu May 05, 2011 4:07 pm

Question: Could you speak about walking meditation please?

Luang Por : When you do walking meditation establish mindfulness at the soles
of the feet, and repeat "Bud-dho", "Bud-dho" together with the left or right foot. It
doesn’t matter which foot, I don’t think this has to be determined, whatever you feel
suits you. But try to keep to your style – one side "Bud" – the other side "dho", and
keep doing this over and over. Try not to go to other things, only keep to "Buddho",
even if there is some kind of thinking that comes up in your mind – it doesn’t matter,
just keep up mindfulness merely knowing "Buddho". If it’s the case that you have
kept "Buddho", going all along, but eventually you start thinking, and "Buddho" disappears,
it means that you have been lacking mindfulness. Then you need to go back
and re-establish mindfulness again. Sooner or later your mind won’t go astray and
the thinking will become less. If you do "Buddho", on and on, and you keep up only
"Buddho", everything else will be gradually cut off by itself.

When you loose "Buddho", it means that the other thoughts you had at that point
were very weighty. Then you need to give Buddha more weight and all the other
thoughts will become very light and finally disappear. It all depends on how we think.
It’s not that we cut out thinking competely while doing "Buddho". There is still some
thinking. Our brain keeps having thoughts of some kind, but we try to have mindfulness
with it.
http://www.tisarana.ca/docs/e-books/pra ... opping.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

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bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Thu May 05, 2011 4:12 pm

Tan Moshe: What shall we do, if we practice anapanasati together with "Buddho",
and after some time "Buddho" disappears ?


Luang Por: If "Buddho" fades away, keep meditating. When "Buddho" disappears,
look at where it disappears. You don’t need to think any more, simply keep watching.
If you start thinking, peace of mind won’t be able to arise. It is right at this point
[where the word fades away], that peace is just about to develop. Be aware and look
at this point. No need to worry. If the breath disappears, it doesn’t matter. Carefully
observe. If you haven’t reached this point yet, then there will still be the sensation of
the breath. Then look at the breath. lf the breath is gone, then just look at where it’s
gone. It goes at the point it wants to go. Wherever this point is, look at where there is
no more breathing, where there is nothing.

What exactly do you want to know? If you tell more how far you’ve come, I can
explain more accurately. Like this, I don’t really know what to say, so it’s in accordance
with the beginning steps. So, when the breath gets lost, is it still there, is it only very
soft and refined?
http://www.tisarana.ca/docs/e-books/pra ... opping.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:32 pm

In order to clearly know these three characteristics of aniccam,dukkham, and anatta the mind must be firm. Thus the effort to bring the mind to a secure and steadfast tranquillity, not allowing it to become fascinated by forms, sounds, odors, flavors, physical sensations and mental phenomena is the essence of meditation techniques, and something we must all develop. Take care when the eyes see forms not to let the mind waver: keep up the inner recitation of Buddho. Take care not to be deluded when hearing sounds: beautiful or ugly sounds are all just worldly conditions. Maintain the mind's firmness. The pleasant and offensive odors that contact the nose — know them, don't be deceived by them. No matter how delicious the taste of the food on the tongue — remain equanimous. Be impassive to the various physical sensations whether hot or cold, hard or soft. This is the supreme practice in Buddhism. So gather your energies and establish the mind in the present moment. - Boo Simm
:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 6230
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Buddho

Post by bodom » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:33 pm

To produce this firm and enduring tranquillity you must go against the stream and enter within. Then you will understand the practice of Dhamma with the mindfulness and wisdom that are present in the heart. If there is no countering the stream and no entry within, the search for virtue externally is an endless one. Truth and virtue do not lie beneath the land or sea, or in the sky or in space. They lie in volitions, the mind that makes effort to give up evil and do good. When the mind converges right here it becomes spacious, cool and easeful, it is established in Dhamma practice. Sitting there is meditation in the sitting posture, standing there is meditation in the standing posture, walking there is meditation while walking and lying down there is meditation until one falls asleep. As soon as we wake we continue the inner recitation of "Buddho," making "Buddho" our constant concern. Wherever the mind goes we don't follow it. We give up all the going and settle for dwelling. - Boo Simm
:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With no struggling, no thinking,
the mind, still,
will see cause and effect
vanishing in the Void.
Attached to nothing, letting go:
Know that this is the way
to allay all stress.

- Upasika Kee Nanayan

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