Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

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Everaldo
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Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by Everaldo » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:19 am

I have tried many times to practice compassion in daily life. But that did not work. Does anyone have any ideas or experience on how to practice compassion in daily life?

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Sam Vara
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by Sam Vara » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:28 am

This article by Ajahn Sucitto has some excellent insights into, and practical help with, the 4 Brahma-Viharas.

https://ajahnsucitto.org/articles/cultivating-empathy/

And this talk by Ajahn Thanissaro focuses more specifically on the sick and dying:

https://www.dhammatalks.org/books/Purit ... n0012.html

SarathW
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by SarathW » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:31 am

But that did not work.
Could you give us more information about what happens?
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

befriend
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by befriend » Sun Dec 09, 2018 7:14 pm

If there is someone creating difficulty for you realize they will suffer from expressing their defilements then you can have equanimity towards them knowing mundane right view is that all beings are heirs to their kamma. If you are suffering think may all beings be free from the aversion I am suffering from.
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.

paul
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by paul » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:17 pm

As befriend has suggested, in Theravada with compassion and all the brahma viharas the emphasis is on meditation and developing one’s own practice. The second link of the noble eightfold path instructs that thoughts of renunciation, good-will and harmlessness should be cultivated, as they oppose the unwholesome roots of greed and aversion. In Theravada the accent is on renunciation, as understanding the four noble truths in relation to one’s own life gives rise to the intention of renunciation; understanding them in relation to other beings gives rise to the other two right intentions.

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salayatananirodha
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by salayatananirodha » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:25 pm

With an understanding of saṅkhārā (AKA fabrications, formations, or preparations), it is easier to practice compassion to a meaningful degree.

Analysis of dependent co-arising: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 17.09.09.png
the shorter set of questions-and-answers: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
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Practice compassion in body and speech, and eventually you will be able to practice compassion in mind; this is how I see it. It is much harder to de-condition the mind from unwholesome mental states, directly. Keeping the five precepts and the seven ariyan precepts will allow you to begin your work in the mind. Abstain from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, harsh speech, gossip, and idle chatter. Training in this way is imbued with compassion. Dāna or giving is also compassionate, and you do this in order to liberate yourself.
16. 'In what has the world originated?' — so said the Yakkha Hemavata, — 'with what is the world intimate? by what is the world afflicted, after having grasped at what?' (167)

17. 'In six the world has originated, O Hemavata,' — so said Bhagavat, — 'with six it is intimate, by six the world is afflicted, after having grasped at six.' (168)

- Hemavatasutta


links:
https://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/index.htm
http://thaiforestwisdom.org/canonical-texts/
http://seeingthroughthenet.net/wp-conte ... _Heart.pdf
https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html

mrgrtt123
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by mrgrtt123 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 7:22 am

https://zenhabits.net/a-guide-to-cultiv ... practices/

Take time on reading this article you will surely learn a lot.

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” – Dalai Lama :hug:
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Manopubbangama
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by Manopubbangama » Mon Dec 10, 2018 4:05 pm

Start Metta practice meditating on someone you love and gradually move to individuals who are not in your group of top-ten-thousand favorite people you know.

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TLCD96
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by TLCD96 » Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:54 am

Sam Vara wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:28 am
This article by Ajahn Sucitto has some excellent insights into, and practical help with, the 4 Brahma-Viharas.

https://ajahnsucitto.org/articles/cultivating-empathy/

And this talk by Ajahn Thanissaro focuses more specifically on the sick and dying:

https://www.dhammatalks.org/books/Purit ... n0012.html

:goodpost:

It's a lifelong process! It must be stressful to have to go about in daily life and keep telling yourself to be compassionate to be a good person. While it's definitely encouraged to remind yourself of these qualities, trying to force yourself to have them is dukkha.

Of course we may have an ideal that compassion is all about "everyone but me", but compassion starts with yourself. If you don't know how to recognize suffering in yourself and respond skillfully, you're going to have a real tough time doing it for others.

So also remember... "may I be happy. May I be free from suffering."
All of us are bound by birth, aging, and death.

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DooDoot
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by DooDoot » Tue Dec 18, 2018 7:07 am

Everaldo wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:19 am
I have tried many times to practice compassion in daily life. But that did not work. Does anyone have any ideas or experience on how to practice compassion in daily life?
Compassion means the wish to prevent & end suffering. It is practised by not harming yourself & not harming others and by helping others relieve suffering when you can and when others ask. Compassion is not saving the world or attempting to change people who don't seek change.
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
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Laurens
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Re: Is it possible to practice compassion in daily life?

Post by Laurens » Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:38 pm

I try to use it as an antidote to anger. Sometimes things that random people do will cause anger to arise in us. Road rage is a prime example of this. A good way to counteract it, before your hand reaches for the horn, is to release that sense that this person did something specifically to annoy you. Let go of the idea that you are somehow important and that everyone needs to act a certain way towards you. Remember that this person might be having a bad day today, or every day. Then send them good will. Whether or not you are able to, or it's appropriate to apologise to them in person, you can apologise to them for your anger internally, and wish that they are happy and free from suffering.

It can be easy to dislike yourself for your anger. But in my experience that doesn't stop it from arising. The things that trigger our anger can sometimes run deep, and aren't so easy to let go of. That's alright. If you can use those moments of anger to practise loving-kindness towards yourself and others, then they can actually be useful for you, and you have the benefit of being able to let go of anger more easily.
"If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?"

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

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