Martial Law in Thailand

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Anagarika
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Anagarika » Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:04 pm

Their stance basically rests on the notion that real democracy can't be applied to rural communities, because a democracy requires an informed citizenry to function properly, and communities outside of Bangkok have simply not been educated yet.
I suppose the same could be said for the Bangkok elite, who may be as ignorant of what is positive and just for Thailand in the long term as the rural poor may be.

I'm really on the fence as to what attitude to have toward the PM Prayuth government. Were Thailand to return to an unfettered "democracy," there'd likely be Red and Yellow riots in the streets and the old political establishments returning to fight for power. Even here in the US, I might prefer to see a wise and benevolent king and multiparty parliament, instead of the ultradysfunctional corporatocracy in the guise of a "democracy" that the US pretends to have on a national level.

In theory, it seems fashionable to bash the PDRC...I just wonder what state Thailand would be in today had they not stepped in, wrongfully or not.

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon May 25, 2015 3:25 am

From HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

http://m.hrw.org/news/2015/05/18/thaila ... 0-violence" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Thailand: After 5 Years, No Justice for 2010 Violence
Military Commanders Untouchable, While Victims Arrested and Pressured Into Silence
MAY 18, 2015
(New York) – Five years on, the Thai government has not prosecuted those responsible for the 2010 political violence in Thailand, Human Rights Watch said today. Despite overwhelming evidence that soldiers used excessive and unnecessary lethal force against protesters and others, not a single soldier has been held accountable for deaths or injuries during the crackdown on street protests.

From March to May 2010, political confrontations between the United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship (UDD), known as the “Red Shirts,” and the government of then-Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, escalated into violence in Bangkok and several provinces. According to the Justice Ministry’s Department of Special Investigation, at least 98 people lost their lives and more than 2,000 were injured.

“The failure of successive Thai governments to prosecute anyone from the military for the 2010 political violence sends a stark message of impunity,” said Brad Adams, Asia director. “Fully five years on, commanders who gave the orders to soldiers and those who pulled the triggers all remain untouchable.”

Human Rights Watch’s May 2011 report, “Descent into Chaos: Thailand’s 2010 Red Shirt Protests and the Government Crackdown,” documented that excessive and unnecessary force by the military caused many deaths and injuries during the 2010 political confrontations. The high number of casualties – including unarmed demonstrators, volunteer medics and first responders, reporters, photographers, and bystanders – resulted in part from the enforcement of “live fire zones” around the UDD protest sites in Bangkok, where sharpshooters and snipers were deployed by the military. Similar findings were presented in September 2012 by the independent Truth for Reconciliation Commission of Thailand (TRCT), which recommended the authorities “address legal violations by all parties through the justice system, which must be fair and impartial.”

Human Rights Watch is deeply concerned by the ongoing politicization of efforts to pursue justice. The then-Abhisit government summarily charged UDD leaders and supporters with serious criminal offenses but ignored abuses by soldiers. The government of former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra took a similarly one-sided approach, focusing criminal investigations primarily on Abhisit, former Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban, and soldiers, while dismissing evidence of violence by armed “black shirt” militants who operated in tandem with the UDD.

The prospects for justice for victims of the 2010 violence appear even bleaker under the ruling National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) junta. The junta leader, Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, has publicly said on repeated occasions that soldiers should not be condemned for the 2010 killings. Investigations by the police, the Department of Special Investigations, and the National Anti-Corruption Commission all came to conclusions that military officers should not be held responsible for unlawful deaths and injuries during the 2010 crackdown because they were acting under orders from the Abhisit government.

In September 2014, police arrested Pansak Srithep, whose 17-year-old son was killed by a military sniper during the 2010 military crackdown, for distributing leaflets demanding justice. Also arrested that day were Payao Akhart and her son Nattapat while they were waiting to stage a street protest nearby. Soldiers shot dead Payao’s daughter, Kamonkate “Nurse Kate” Akhart, while she was working as a volunteer medic inside Wat Patumwanaram temple in Bangkok on May 19, 2010.

“Despite clear photographic and other evidence that details the abuses committed by soldiers, the families of the victims are being pressured into silence,” Adams said.

The Department of Special Investigation issued a finding in September 2012 that indicated the military was culpable for 36 deaths. However, insufficient efforts have been made to identify the soldiers and commanding officers responsible for the shootings. Under pressure from the military, the department ultimately decided to charge only Abhisit and Suthep for the killings, using “command responsibility” as the basis because the two men had approved the use of live ammunition to contain and disperse the protests. In August 2014, the criminal court ruled that it had no jurisdiction to try Abhisit and Suthep because they held political office at the time.

International human rights treaties ratified by Thailand make clear that status as a government official does not justify immunity from legal responsibility for committing serious human rights violations. Moreover, by referring the case to the National Anti-Corruption Commission, the criminal court essentially transformed and diminished a criminal investigation examining serious crimes into an inquiry regarding abuse of official positions. The ruling is contrary to Thailand’s international legal obligations to ensure the right to an effective remedy for victims of serious human rights violations, including unlawful killings. A victim’s right to an effective remedy requires that the government take the necessary investigative, judicial, and corrective steps to redress the violation and address the victim’s rights to knowledge, justice, and reparations.

After seizing power in May 2014, the NCPO junta halted payment of financial reparations, initiated by the Yingluck government as part of political reconciliation measures, to all those harmed by the 2010 political violence. Before the disbursements were ended, the money was given to individuals who were disabled or injured by the violence, as well as the relatives of those who died in the unrest. Overall, a total of 524 individuals were to be compensated under the scheme, and were scheduled to receive 577 million baht (approximately US$17 million) of compensation from the state.

“If Thailand is serious about realizing reconciliation for the 2010 violence, it should demonstrate that no one – whether soldier or militant – is above the law,” Adams said. “No Thai government, including the ruling junta, should be able to escape its obligations to prosecute all those responsible for the 2010 political violence.”

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Mon May 25, 2015 9:29 am

"Year-old Thai coup imposes superficial calm but little else"

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/4fa213ed ... ittle-else" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:44 pm

http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2015/06/06 ... bsolutism/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Thailand haunted by the ghost of absolutism
6 June 2015
Author: Patrick Jory, University of Queensland
The essence of the political conflict remains unchanged since it began in late 2005, when a movement backed by Thailand’s conservative elite ousted the elected government of the popular Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. Today, a power bloc — consisting of the military, the bureaucracy, and Sino–Thai banking and industry, given political legitimacy and ideological unity by the monarchy — continues its struggle to preserve its political supremacy. This power bloc is threatened by the politicisation of Thailand’s rural and urban working classes — whose political potential Thaksin was the first to recognise and exploit.

The power bloc wages this struggle in ideological terms in the name of ‘reform’. But what is endlessly debated in the pro-establishment media and by conservative intellectuals as a moral issue — how to solve the problem of corrupt politicians, vote-buying, ignorant voters — is in reality a political issue: how to accommodate the entry of millions of Thai citizens into Thailand’s political process. The draft constitution’s oft-stated desire to rid Thai politics of the former is really an attempt to block the latter

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:55 pm

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandal ... ublespeak/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Thailand’s rulers have made doublespeak a central strategy of its rule and turned it into an art of absurdity.

During the first year following the coup by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) on May 22, 2014, the junta in Thailand summoned at least 751 people, including a large number of intellectuals, leaders of local political networks, and those whom the junta considered opponents. These people were variously detained, interrogated, intimidated, or simply warned to cease their opposition to the coup.
The junta told the Thai public that the purpose of the summons was “attitude adjustment”.
“Reform” is another keyword used by the regime to describe the changes enacted via junta order or envisioned in the draft constitution. But rather than improvement, these measures amount to winding the clock back 30 years with respect to democracy, decentralisation, and the role of the military in politics.

This “reform” is pushed ahead under the slogan “Marching Forward Thailand” in order to “Give Happiness Back to People” despite ongoing suppression, injustice and gloomy economic news.

For the NCPO, reconciliation means the elimination of apparent social or political conflict. Attitude adjustment means accepting indoctrination by the junta obediently. Reform means going back to a time before democracy. Orwellian doublespeak is rampant in the NCPO’s Thailand.

Doublespeak is neither new nor specific to Thailand. In 2010, the government under Abhisit Vejjajiva ordered a violent suppression of red shirt demonstrations in central Bangkok and referred to the crackdown as “taking back the space”.

the repetition and extension of doublespeak over time, combined with the criminalisation of criticism of the junta, denies the truth and produces impunity for state violence. When the current regime misnames detention and torture as “attitude adjustment,” they are following a well-worn path.

Most recently, when a historic process meant that Abhisit Vejjajiva and company were charged in late 2013 in the criminal court with premeditated murder for their role in the 2010 bloodshed, they maintained that they did not order a crackdown, but aimed to “take back the space” occupied by the protestors. Under legal conditions that remain murky, the charges against them were dismissed following the most recent coup.

The current junta continues to insist that they are reformers working tirelessly for reconciliation in order to return happiness to people, not dictators. They know well that the judiciary is either firmly on their side or at their disposal to legalise their doublespeak and to absolve their wrongdoings.

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Fri Jun 26, 2015 8:10 am

Asian Human Rights Commission

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AHRC-STM-094-2015
June 25, 2015

THAILAND: A military regime that must gono-longer-wanted

June 26 is observed as the International Day in support of the victims of torture. Unfortunately, in Thailand, the day will be eclipsed by the military regime that is in power since May 2014, when it overthrew the last elected government.

The National Council for Peace and Order that is in power is military machinery. It has, since inception, actively engaged in purging voices of political as well as academic dissent on the military coup.

Practice of torture is widespread in Thailand. Those keeping a watch on human rights abuses and political movements in Thailand would still remember the ghastly video news that showed arrested persons with their arms and legs tied, forced to crawl like reptiles on a beach, to make their way into the military/police vehicles, as part of the then government’s crackdown on narcotic trade in Thailand. Situations have not changed since, but have, in fact, worsened.

The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has over the past 10 years documented 120 cases of torture from Thailand. Torture is committed even within court halls. For instance, an accused standing trial is brought to the court in handcuffs, and the handcuffs chained to yet another chain that is locked onto both ankles of the accused. Such treatment of suspects in open might be less severe compared to what a suspect faces inside police lockups and prisons. It is torture nonetheless. The practice also speaks to the primitive nature of the Thai legal system.

Thailand’s Judiciary is one of the least advanced in the region. It can only be compared to institutions known as the judiciary in Burma, China, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Even the Supreme Court of Thailand is not independent from interference. The Judiciary in Thailand is highly vulnerable to interference from the government, powerful politicians, the Military, and to those who can invoke a royal decree or pronouncement.

Being circumscribed by the above factors, the Judiciary, and the legal system within which the Judiciary operates, offers little help in providing redress in cases of human rights abuse. For instance, concepts like Habeas Corpus Writs are unheard of in Thailand. This means, in cases of disappearances followed by arbitrary and incommunicado detention and torture, common to the country, it is the burden of the petitioner to prove the missing person is in State custody. Thailand does not accept that it is the State’s responsibility to account for every citizen within its jurisdiction.

It is this primitive nature of the Thai legal system, and a weak Constitutional Court, that has led to 11 military coups in Thailand, since 1932. Despite 16 new constitutions since the first coup and the first Constitution, Thailand could not prevent a military dictatorship from declaring and “taking over administration of the country.” Soon after the 11th successful military coup, the National Council for Peace and Order has replaced the country’s Judiciary with Military Courts, practically for all purposes concerning fundamental human rights and freedoms.

Every case of torture must be investigated, and tried in a civilian court. In Thailand it is not even remotely possible since the National Council for Peace and Order has ousted the jurisdiction of the civilian courts for all matters relating to complaints against the state. Even if the martial law is lifted, the courts in Thailand are immature in their understanding of the seriousness of the crime and about the state’s responsibility to end it.

It is in the context of an immature justice administration system that custodial violence like torture should be analysed and understood in Thailand. Today, no one can safely complain against torture or other inhuman or degrading treatment in Thailand. In fact, no one can even freely speak or express opinion in Thailand. Communications are monitored under the martial law and there is no more free press in the country. The military regime has sunk its teeth deep into the Thai social fabric; even lectures in colleges and universities are forced to meet standards that the martial law has put in place.

It is an anomaly and equally a shame that despite the martial law continuing in Thailand, most international organisations, including the UN, have their Asian regional offices in Thailand, while human rights defenders, free journalists, and even freethinking academics of Thailand have to either remain silent or have left the country. Human rights defenders from foreign countries working in Thailand are offered short-term employment visas that require renewal every third or fourth month.

The international community has abandoned Thailand and its people to fate. Most agencies that speak about human rights and humanitarian aid continue business from within and without Thailand as if nothing has happened in Thailand.


It is time to stop being blind to this. The International Day in Support of Victims of Torture is an opportunity for the international community to express support and show solidarity to the people of Thailand.

http://www.humanrights.asia/news/ahrc-n ... M-094-2015

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Fri Aug 28, 2015 4:16 pm

http://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opin ... -democracy" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The second news item involves a conscript’s petition to the government for being chained and shackled by a retired navy officer whom he was sent to work for as a servant. The petition has triggered a...

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sun Sep 06, 2015 6:02 am

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/ ... 0X20150904" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Just minutes after being locked up for 30 years for insulting Thailand’s monarchy, Pongsak Sriboonpeng described what he thought was the cause of his capture: a poorly chosen Facebook friend.
pongsak’s sentence – an initial 60 years, halved after he pleaded guilty – is the harshest of its kind recorded in the country’s history. It is part of a dramatic rise in arrests and convictions in Thailand for “lèse majesté,” or insulting the monarchy. The crackdown has been enabled by sweeping new powers the military granted itself after a May 2014 coup, and what government officials say is a junta-ordered campaign to more vigorously police online offences.

Many of the suspects arrested since the coup were detained without charge, held by the army without access to lawyers and, in many cases, forced to hand over passwords to their online accounts, according to defense lawyers and a legal watchdog group monitoring these cases. Both Pongsak and a woman detained in a separate lèse majesté case said they were forced to reveal their passwords to their interrogators.
None of the postings included threats of violence toward the monarchy or appeals to abolish it. Since the arrests of the two men, all of the postings deemed offensive by authorities have been taken down.
The targets of the law are increasingly ordinary people, many of them red-shirt supporters of Thaksin, rather than prominent individuals, said David Streckfuss, an independent academic in the Thai city of Khon Kaen who researches lèse majesté. In Thailand, the royalist establishment backed by the military has repeatedly tried to neutralize the political machine of Thaksin and his sister Yingluck, who were both elected prime minister with broad rural support, only to be toppled by military coup.
Major General Werachon Sukhondhapatipak, a spokesman for the government, said the administration of Yingluck Shinawatra had not properly pursued lèse majesté cases, which he called a “national security issue.”

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Mkoll
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mkoll » Sun Sep 06, 2015 11:41 pm

Thai constitution draft rejected by junta's Reform Council
Thailand's National Reform Council rejected a draft constitution in a vote in Bangkok Sunday, delaying the junta's plan to hold an election as early as late 2016.

Less than half of the military-appointed council supported the draft, Chairman Thienchay Kiranandana said after a televised vote. A new committee will be set up within a month and will have 180 days to write another draft.



The proposed charter attracted criticism from both sides of Thailand's political divide. The Pheu Thai party, which was ousted by a military coup in May 2014, said it would take power away from voters, while the Democrat party said it risked deepening the nation's problems and spurring more violence. Sunday's failed vote means the drafting process will restart from scratch and there will be no time frame for a return to democracy.

The draft was a revision of a version released in April, and could have stopped any single party from dominating parliament. It would also have introduced additional checks from unelected bodies on future governments and allow for an unelected prime minister to be chosen from outside parliament.

Like the 2014 coup and another in 2006, the constitution was seen as an attempt to diminish the electoral dominance of the Shinawatra family, whose allied parties have won every national election in the past 14 years.

The most contentious clause would have led to the creation of a "committee on reform and reconciliation" made up of the heads of the armed forces, police, the prime minister, heads of the senate and house and appointed experts. The committee for the first five years would have been allowed to take over executive and legislative powers if it deemed there was a political crisis. Critics say it would have created a state within a state and legalize coups in a country that has seen 12 military takeovers since 1932.



The constitution drafters struggled to explain how the committee would play a supportive role, said Boonlert Kachayudhadej, a member of the National Reform Committee who voted against the charter. The largest political parties, which are usually at odds, were united in their opposition to the charter, he said.



"There is a lot of criticism that it will create a state within a state and perpetuate power," he said on parliamentary television after the vote. "The committee seems to have a lot of power, and that may lead to more disputes."

Before Sunday's vote, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-Ocha said political reforms would continue in line with the interim charter, which was written by a committee he appointed after seizing power as head of the army and being installed as premier.

Prayuth will appoint 21 members of a new constitutional drafting committee in the next 30 days and they will have 180 days to complete a new charter draft before a national referendum is held, said Kamnoon Sidhisamarn, a spokesman for the Constitutional Drafting Committee.

"Now it's the prime minister's job to appoint 21 members of the new CDC and also a 200-member steering council for reform," said Surachai Liengboonlertchai, the vice president of the National Legislative Assembly, the junta-appointed parliament. "We will move ahead in line with the interim constitution. We may take 180 days more than earlier scheduled, but we need to do it to get a constitutional draft that's acceptable to everyone."
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Thu Sep 10, 2015 6:06 pm

Not a joke - "Pichai summoned by junta for attitude adjustment"


http://www.nationmultimedia.com/breakin ... 68533.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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gavesako
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by gavesako » Sun Sep 13, 2015 8:07 am

Prayut, the fortune teller and the ghost of the guru
Warin Buawiratlert’s predictions might not be perfect, but that doesn’t stop the military’s top brass from lining up for psychic sessions.

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/special ... f-the-guru" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

Access to Insight - Theravada texts
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
Dhammatalks.org - Sutta translations

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon Sep 14, 2015 5:00 am

53 Transgender students sent to military camp for 'attitude adjustment"


the katoey leaders and other students will be sent to a military boot camp for attitude readjustment


Which brings us to how the Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University dealt with an erotic dance in a hazing ritual. The rector of the former teachers' college did not see the problem as stemming from authoritarianism...

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opin ... r-problems. View our policies at http://goo.gl/9HgTd" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; and http://goo.gl/ou6Ip" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;. © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved.

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Mon Sep 14, 2015 7:33 am

Nation demands immediate release of reporter

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/breakin ... 68751.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon Sep 14, 2015 8:12 am

Mr Man wrote:Nation demands immediate release of reporter

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/breakin ... 68751.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The nation newspaper has been a cheerleader for the military coups of the last 9 years.
Their one saving grace is that they employ Pravit - the reporter undergoing reeducation in an army camp- who happens to put things truthfully and clearly. Which enrages the current dictatorship.

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon Sep 14, 2015 4:10 pm

http://www.asiasentinel.com/politics/fe ... -thailand/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Fear Rules the Junta in Thailand

Despite unceasing repression and censorship, the junta apparently came to the view that opposition to the charter meant that it needs to do a lot more to guarantee its version of Thailand’s political future is in place. Since the May 22, 2014 coup, with hundreds having been detained for periods of “re-education,” dozens of political opponents have fled overseas, and the draconian lese majeste law has been used aggressively with record length of prison sentences. But this has been insufficient.

Sporadic anti-coup activism has continued and the erratic and prickly Prayuth has shown considerable frustration and anger that he is opposed. His outbursts against Thaksin and his supporters, the media and anyone who criticises his regime are evidence of his fear that the future is not secured.
Prayuth and his supporters are clear that the military government must stay in power for as long as it takes to complete this “national reform” that seeks to so entrench authoritarianism in law, education and society that democracy will be off the agenda for years to come.

His strategy is thus not without risk. What Prayuth ignores is that this use of blunt and brutish repression and the military’s determination to stay in power has, in the past, resulted in popular revolts. Prayuth may well bring his own downfall through his determination to “reform.”


Author Kevin Hewison is the Sir Walter Murdoch Professor of Politics and International Studies and Director, Asia Research Centre, Murdoch University

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Fri Sep 18, 2015 4:03 am

http://www.prachatai.com/english/node/5349" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The Murderous State

Explains why after killing over 90 protestors and wounding over a thousand the main people who ordered the shootings were given no punishment. And looks at why it has happened before and will happen again.
Think about it: faced with the choice of announcing the dissolution of parliament and holding new elections or murdering the people, the civilian government [of Abhisit Vejjajiva] still chose murder. In spite of this, when they lost the elections [in 2011], they did not have to face accountability for any of their crimes. Will a government that has come from a coup accept the end of their rule along with a multiplicity of punishments to account for their crimes?

Murder is the therefore a frequent choice of the Thai state. Murder is too easily chosen and the aspects of Thai culture that may restrain the state’s impulse to murder grow weaker and weaker in turn

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Tue Sep 22, 2015 11:09 am

robertk wrote:
Mr Man wrote: The nation newspaper has been a cheerleader for the military coups of the last 9 years.
Their one saving grace is that they employ Pravit - the reporter undergoing reeducation in an army camp- who happens to put things truthfully and clearly. Which enrages the current dictatorship.
Now no longer with "The Nation"

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general ... y-adjusted" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Thu Oct 08, 2015 2:55 pm

Brave woman
http://news.yahoo.com/afp-award-recogni ... 03179.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
(AFP) - Thai journalist Mutita Chuachang has won the 2015 Agence France-Presse Kate Webb Prize for her powerful and persistent reporting of royal defamation cases that have multiplied under the country's military rulers.
A graduate of Thammasat University in Bangkok, which has a strong pro-democracy tradition, Mutita has been raising awareness of the bizarre nature of the trials: she often cannot even repeat the alleged offence without risking falling foul of the law herself.

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:49 am

Good news!
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/politic ... 70591.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Army unit helps Isaan folk find 'correct political understanding'


JITTRAPORN SENWONG

"CORRECT" political understanding has been given to people in 20 provinces in the Northeast -
The Second Army Area undertook the mission through the Centre for Reconciliation and Reform, sending staff to talk with people of different political opinions.
The feedback had been good, Thawat said, with little or no opposition. He also looked forward to using this approach to explain the upcoming charter draft, he said.
Building "correct understanding" is one of the Army areas' duties to support the military-led regime, according to Army commander-in-chief General Theerachai Nakawanich's policies.

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Fri Oct 16, 2015 4:42 pm

The Palme D’Or-winning Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul has said he does not want his new film to be screened in in his home country, for fear of the reaction of the ruling military junta.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oc ... are_btn_tw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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