Martial Law in Thailand

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Tue Oct 27, 2015 2:53 pm

http://www.prachatai.com/english/node/5570" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The authorities arrested and pressed sedition charge against a 77-year-old teacher for giving flowers to support an anti-junta activist.

According to Winyat Chatmontri, the General Secretary of the FTLA, Preecha is charged with Article 116 of the Criminal Code, the sedition law, and the violation of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO)’s Order No. 7/2014 for participating in a political gathering of more than five people.

Winyat told Prachatai that the retired teacher was charged for giving flowers to support Pansak Srithep, a pro-democracy activist and the father of a boy killed by the military during the 2010 political violence, while the activist was leading a three-day march called “I Walk Therefore I Am” on 15 March 2015 to campaign against the use of military courts to try civilians.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sat Oct 31, 2015 5:32 pm

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http://www.khaosodenglish.com/detail.ph ... 6&section=" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
BANGKOK — Student activists have claimed responsibility for hanging two banners denouncing the 2006 coup in Bangkok today, on the 8th anniversary of the military takeover.

The first banner was hung on the pedestrian bridge in front of Chulalongkorn University in downtown Bangkok early this morning. It read: "8 Years, 19 September, the slain democracy is still dead."

Another banner was later erected from a pedestrian bridge on Viphavadee Road in northern Bangkok, right in front of the headquarters of Thai Rath newspaper. "Mr. Thai Democracy, Born 24 June 1932. Died 19 September 2006," the banner proclaimed, referring to the 1932 revolution that established constitutional democracy in Thailand.

Police officers removed the two banners shortly after they were hung.

On 19 September 2006 army chief Gen. Sondhi Boonyaratglin deposed then-Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra as he was about to address the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, USA. The coup was the beginning of an effort to eradicate Mr. Thaksin and his influence from politics. The more recent 22 May coup, which toppled the government of Mr. Thaksin's sister, is considered a continuation of that effort.

In a statement posted on their website, the Thai Student Centre for Democracy (TSCD) took responsibility for the banner on Viphavadee Road, and said the banner in central Bangkok was hung by an affiliate student group, the Chulalongkorn Community for the People (CCP).

According to the TSCD, the pedestrian bridge on Viphavadee Road was chosen because it was the location where taxi driver Nuamthong Praiwan hanged himself to death in protest of the 2006 coup.

"Today is the 8th anniversary of the coup, the day that led to the first loss of Thai life because of the coup, Nuamthong Praiwan," the statement says. "And it is not the only life that was lost. So many other lives were sacrificed in the violence that escalated after the coup."

It continues, "The TSCD is hereby using the opportunity of the 8th anniversary of the 19 September coup to remind all Thais of the vile and undeniable consequences of military coups.”

On 30 September 2006, Mr. Nuamthong rammed a taxi painted with an anti-coup slogan into a military tank that was stationed in Bangkok's Royal Plaza. He was injured by the incident, which he said was an effort to display his condemnation of the coup. He also told the press he was willing to die in the attack.

However, Col. Akkara Thiproj, deputy spokesperson for the military junta, dismissed Mr. Nuamthong's motive and claimed that "nobody’s ideals are so great that they would sacrifice their lives for them."

Mr. Nuamthong later hanged himself in front of Thai Rath headquarters on 31 October 2006. In his farewell letter, he said he wanted to disprove Col. Akkara’s "insult.” He also wrote that the date of his suicide was chosen as a tribute to the popular uprising in October 1973.

"I'd like to tell my children and my wife to be proud of me. Do not be sad. I hope I will not see another coup in my next life," Mr. Nuamthong wrote in the letter.

There has been no immediate reaction from the authorities regarding the banners, though all forms of dissent and protest are banned by the the junta's National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO). Authorities have arrested dozens of activists in recent months for violating the ban, sending some of them to face trial in military courts.

Yesterday, the military blocked an academic discussion on "Demise of Foreign Dictatorships" and detained the panel's organisers.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon Nov 09, 2015 4:52 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/world/thai-fortun ... kuqu6.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Bangkok: A Thai fortune teller arrested as part of a high-profile royal insult investigation has died, the government said on Monday, the second suspect in as many weeks to die in police custody.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/world/thai-fortun ... z3r0vmK300" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Wed Nov 11, 2015 6:30 am

Only one of the three arrested last month is still alive: 2 die in custody.
But note that according to the army dictator nothing to do with the military: (Army commandos arrested the three and the detention site is inside the 11th Army Division.)

http://news.asiaone.com/news/asia/thai- ... tody-death" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
BANGKOK - Thailand's junta chief Tuesday said the military was not to blame for the death of a famous fortune teller charged with royal defamation after he died in custody in a Bangkok army barracks.


Suriyan Sucharitpolwong is the second person to have died in detention at the controversial site within weeks, both suspects in a shadowy palace probe that has even seen a senior military official investigated.

Thailand's army have long portrayed themselves as protectors of the monarchy and it is rare for soldiers to be implicated in lese majeste.

Under the draconian law anyone convicted of insulting the king, queen, heir or regent can face up to 15 years in jail on each count.

Speaking to reporters in Bangkok Tuesday, junta chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha said the detention site was "not a military prison" but run by the justice ministry and supervised by police.

"When you use the word military prison it's shocking. The military is kind not cruel," he said.

Rights groups have raised concerns about the temporary remand facility, located on the barracks of the 11th Army Circle in Bangkok.

It was formally announced in September as a site for suspects in special cases including those affecting national security. Two foreigners charged over the recent Bangkok shrine bombing are being held there.

The Thai Lawyers for Human Rights, a local legal advocacy group, has previously said the facility is "unaccountable for outsiders", warning it would "likely give rise to human rights violations".

On Monday authorities revealed Suriyan, better known by his soothsayer name "Mor Yong", died of a blood infection Saturday evening, just hours after he was found unconscious in his cell.

He was arrested last month alongside his assistant and Police Major Prakrom Warunprapa, who authorities later announced had "hanged" himself while in custody.

- See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/asia/thai- ... w8FNA.dpuf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:15 am

http://m.bangkokpost.com/opinion/761020" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Authorities can say whatever they want about the cause of Mor Yong's death. But they cannot expect people to believe it. There is no need trying to get frank opinions from people face to face,...
Lese majeste suspect Pol Col Akrawut Limrat killed himself by jumping off a building. His body was immediately cremated without any traditional religious ceremony. Pol Maj Prakom Warunprapa was found hanging...

ely. Those mysterious deaths fanned rumours about a similar fate for Mor Yong after his arrest. Authorities did not only deny the rumours, but they also made scoffing remarks about Mor Yong pretending...
and http://goo.gl/ou6Ip" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;. © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sat Nov 14, 2015 4:52 pm

http://www.prachatai.com/english/node/5608" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
An international think tank monitoring corruption has revealed in its latest report that Thailand’s defence spending is among the least transparent in the world, especially since the 2014 coup d’état.

According to the 2015 Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index (GI) compiled by Transparency International, Thailand’s defence spending is graded ‘E’ in an index with grades ranging from ‘A’ for best practice to ‘F’ for the worst

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sun Nov 22, 2015 6:06 pm

Following a cabinet meeting on Oct 27, Gen Prayut denounced university lecturers as having instigated rebellious thoughts and actions among students. Four days later, a network of university professors...

Please credit and share this article with others using this link: http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/securit ... uni-campus" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Tue Nov 24, 2015 8:43 am

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/opinion ... 73463.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Jiang Yefei and Dong Guangping, who may be at risk of torture, were quietly sent back to China even through the United Nations refugee agency had succeeded in securing their resettlement in the United States.

The UN said the deportation was a serious disappointment, and underscores the long-standing gap in Thai domestic law concerning ensuring appropriate treatment of people with international protection needs. Human Rights Watch said it was "cruel" and "unlawful".

"These actions blatantly contradict the pledge to uphold rights that the prime minister made before the UN General Assembly. It's deeply alarming, if not surprising, that the junta's deference to abusive neighbours takes priority over the rule of law," said Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch.

Moreover, forced repatriation is against international norms and best practices. What's sad about this incident is that Thailand has not learned anything from the previous international blunder when it deported more than 100 Uighur refugees back to China where they face an uncertain future.

In spite of insistence from Bangkok that the Uighurs will be treated humanely, it didn't take long for the Chinese authorities to manhandle these returnees.

Pictures of their heads in hoods and being dragged from the airplane circulated widely around the world. It was humiliating for Thailand because the government had told the world that China had assured them these Uighurs would be treated humanely. But in the end, in their desire to please China, the military government in Bangkok has brought the country international condemnation, not to mention that their decision risked the lives of those returned.

In response to the deportation, mobs of Uighurs ransacked the Thai consulate in Istanbul, another group also protested outside the Thai consulate in Berlin.

Even worse, two months after the deportation of the Uighurs, a massive bomb went off at the Erawan Shrine, reportedly in revenge for Bangkok's decision to send the 109 Uighurs back to China. The two suspects are Chinese nationals from Xinjiang.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Tue Dec 01, 2015 6:21 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/30/world ... .html?_r=0" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Thai Economy and Spirits Are Sagging
By THOMAS FULLER NOV. 29, 2015

Do not be fooled by the throngs of Chinese tourists clogging the entrance to the gilded Grand Palace, the roads buzzing with traffic or the plastic smiles of hostesses greeting the business lunch crowd at luxury hotels.

Thailand is in a rut.

The economy is moribund and Thai households are among the most indebted in Asia.

King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the epoxy of a fractured nation who commands divine-like reverence and turns 88 next month, is ailing and has not been seen in public since September.

A military government that seized power last year is showing no haste in handing back power to politicians who have spent the past decade in often violent conflict.

Robberies and other property crimes have risen more than 60 percent this year.

“No one feels like smiling anymore,” said Sompetch Pimsri, a merchant at a fruit and vegetable market behind the Temple of Dawn, a tourist landmark along the Chao Phraya River. “Life is so stressful. I don’t know how to explain it, but it feels like nothing is working in Thailand anymore.”

Thailand was once the torchbearer of freedom and prosperity in Southeast Asia — a center of commerce for Indochina, a bastion of free expression and a home for refugees from neighboring countries, which for years Thais saw as war-ravaged basket cases.

But these days when Thais look to their neighbors, they feel envy, not pity.

To the west, there are signs of a blossoming democracy in Myanmar after the victory of the Nobel Peace laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi over the military establishment that oppressed her for years. To the east the economies of Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam are showing signs of vigor and luring foreign investors away from Thailand

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Fri Dec 04, 2015 10:45 pm

New York Times censored again as Thailand marks birthday of fragile king

http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-thaila ... 9420151204" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sat Dec 05, 2015 3:56 am

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandal ... n-thaksin/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Q8As the latest corruption scandal shows, the Thai junta hasn’t rid the country of dodgy politicians; it’s simply taken their place.

Anti-corruption has been a poster child of anti-democratic groups in Thailand since 2005.

The People’s Alliance for Democracy (2005-2008), the Council for National Security (2006-2007), the People’s Democratic Reform Council (2013-2014), and the National Council of Peace and Order (2014–present) have all used it to drive their agenda.

Now, as the Thai economy crumbles and dissent grows, an anti-corruption campaign is the only lifeline for the ruling NCPO. Supposedly, it confirms the junta’s superior moral standard when compared to elected politicians.

Since the May 2014 coup, the NCPO has adopted harsh measures to eradicate corruption, and General Prayuth Chan-ocha, NCPO head, constantly repeats his intention to fight against dishonesty in public office.

Unsurprisingly, the main target of the NCPO’s anti-corruption campaign has been former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

After being overthrown by a constitutional court ruling before the coup, Yingluck was retroactively impeached by the junta-appointed National Legislative Assembly (NLA) in August for suspicion of corruption in a rice-subsidy scheme she oversaw as PM. The scheme operated at a loss and cost the state several million baht.

A criminal case against her was filed with the Supreme Court, and she now faces a possible 10 years in jail. For civil compensation, the NCPO avoided a lengthy judicial process by commissioning an ad hoc tribunal under the Government Tort Act. Under this, a large part of Yingluck’s assets could be confiscated – an outcome that could cripple the future political ambitions of both her, and her brother Thaksin Shinawatra.

But the NCPO’s anti-corruption campaign has gone further than holding Yingluck to account.

After coming to power, Prayuth was given instant impunity from section 44 of the Interim Constitution, allowing him to overrule any law and regulation at his will. In addition, the NCPO, upon receiving a list of suspected civil servants and local officials from the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC), invoked its dictatorial power to immediately remove or suspend these suspects from active posts.

Furthermore, the NLA amended the anti-corruption law, adding the death penalty to the charge. The upcoming constitution will probably contain more chapters on public morals as well as severe punishment for unethical politicians.

These aggressive measures appeal to the junta’s supporters who believe that such powers will quickly rid the country of corrupt politicians.

They might reluctantly admit that Prayuth’s personality is rogue and erratic. That the NCPO’s policies might resemble the Thaksinomics once so widely derided. That people’s rights and liberties are almost absent. And that the country has been humiliated in the international arena.

But still, they insist, this is better than former PM Thaksin’s administration because Prayuth is rescuing Thailand from corruption.

Yet is Thailand becoming less corrupt? Has the NCPO’s aggressive campaign transformed Thailand into a country where the rule of law and transparency reign? The reality points to the opposite. The country is as corrupt as before, or even worse.

For example, the business sector has reported that “commissions” for government projects has risen to 30 or 50 per cent of the total project value. Local mafias on the street were replaced by men in uniform to whom vendors still pay protection.

General Prayuth

The NCPO has also appointed their relatives to the administration. Prayuth’s brother was appointed into the NLA and the NCPO. National Reform Council members appointed their spouses and offspring as assistants.
The NCPO has also appointed their relatives to the administration. Prayuth’s brother was appointed into the NLA and the NCPO. National Reform Council members appointed their spouses and offspring as assistants.

Asset disclosure revealed unjustifiable wealth in many NLA members’ accounts. Prayuth’s cabinet was also accused of procuring extraordinarily expensive microphone sets that prompted public outcry.

Despite these allegations, the NCPO’s supporters argue that while corruption persists, it is of a smaller scale than before. They conclude that Thais have to tolerate the lesser evil to eliminate the greater one. Such pragmatism is in great contrast to the ultra-moralistic standard they applied to previous cabinets.

Such claims are naïve for two reasons.

First, corruption within the Thai army is not at all small. Fraud can be found at many levels. Officers enjoy bribes from Thai men who want to avoid compulsory conscription. Once within a barracks, officers can take a portion of conscripts’ salary. Later, these conscripts can be allocated to generals’ houses as servants, gardeners, and drivers.

The army has also triggered many multi-million baht scandals involving weapon and equipment procurements; armored vehicles, fighter jets, bomb detectors, even aerial surveillance balloons. This corruption is so systemised that people tend to forget that it exists.

Second, the solution to corruption is far more complicated than exercising authoritative power, punishing the accused and hoping that this brutality intimidates others.

Corruption thrives in Thailand because its culture suits the practice so well that a few transfers or even imprisonments will never correct the ill practice.

Thailand is known for its deference to seniority, its hierarchical social structure, and face-saving, all of which allows corruption to flourish. No one offends the powerful senior by accusing him of wrongful conduct, even when it is obvious. Whistle-blowers are often condemned for causing shame to an organisation.

In order to change these attitudes, Thailand needs to instill a sense of equality and openness. Dissent must be encouraged. Misconduct should be reported without fear of revenge. Unfortunately, the junta could never offer such values, for it is one of the most hierarchical and opaque institutions in Thailand.

Section 44 is not the magic tool many expect it to be. Corruption is the symptom of a deficit in the rule of law, particularly when people cheat the system for personal gain. In this light, the NCPO’s exercise of section 44 deepens the culture of cheating, confirming for the public that the end justifies the means.

Since corruption is ingrained within society, any anti-corruption campaign has to plan for a long-term and systematic operation. Consistency and fairness are two important keys.

But Prayuth’s attention span is short. Prosecution has been sporadic. Moreover, his anti-corruption campaign has only seemed to hit only the Shinwatra family while many other cases involving the NCPO’s allies remain untouched.

By not acting even-handedly, the public has seen Prayuth’s anti-corruption campaign for what it really is; rhetoric to harass his personal enemies.

This unfair approach will not teach people to stop being corrupt; it simply encourages them to choose the right side of politics, so they can continue to commit bad deeds.

Thailand’s latest corruption scandal – Rajabhakti Park
In its supposed quest to rid Thailand of corruption, the NCPO’s biggest challenge has recently emerged.

In early November, the junta made high-profile arrests of a famous fortune-teller and two policemen for lese majeste. These arrests led to more warrants for army officers who fled the country and were later dismissed without honours.

The case continued with the mysterious deaths in detention of some of the accused. It also emerged that these men were involved in alleged corruption in the construction of Thailand’s newest major landmark, Rajabhakti Park.

RajabhaktiPark-440

Rajabhakti Park is located on the southwest coast of Thailand. It displays huge bronze statutes of seven great ancient Thai kings in order to commemorate their reigns and inspire loyalty to the current monarchy.

The park is the masterpiece of former Army Chief, Udomdej Sitabutr, who boasted about raising hundreds of millions of baht through donations and finishing the construction in only a few months.

But investigations have revealed that a large portion of the donations were diverted into people’s pockets. Sculptors admitted that they were paid much lower than the official price. Palm trees, quoted at 300,000 baht each, were actually donated for free.

The Rajabhakti Park scandal has caused serious damage for the NCPO. The scale of corruption is large with possibly hundreds of millions of baht embezzled. Moreover, it challenges the army’s notion of loyalty.

The army was caught benefitting illegally from the monarchy’s revered status, an act that brought disgrace to the palace. Finally, in addition to several mid-ranked officers, evidence ultimately pointed to Udomdej.

Although Udomdej retired in October, he is still an active member of the NCPO, and is deputy defence minister. He failed to clear himself of accusations of corruption when he gave an interview on the topic. He admitted that there was corruption but all money has since been returned as a donation to the project.

The army is not used to purging its own personnel. If it does, it will be in a kangaroo court, not through a normal judicial process. Usually, only a few low-ranked officers are held accountable; the big fish get away.

But the NCPO is now a political body in the public spotlight. The Rajabhakti Park case posed a dilemma for them. If the NCPO punished Udomdej, it would be breaking the long-held tradition of unity within the military and also upset the regime.

But if the NCPO spared him, it would not seem any better than former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, who was tainted with corruption, disloyalty, and favouritism. After a brief internal probe, the current Army Commander-in-Chief, Theerachai Nakvanich, announced that the commission found no corruption.

He then lost his temper when one female correspondent asked for a financial statement. He ranted that he could not understand why people wanted to punish those with good intentions. The lame press conference did more harm than good to the NCPO’s reputation. It made it seem they chose to cover up the crime of its cronies, just as any politician would have done.

The press continues to investigate the story and the National Anti-Corruption Commission have finally accepted the case. These latest developments prove how incompetent the army is in tackling corruption and how unrealistic the pragmatic hope of choosing the lesser evil over a supposed bigger evil is.

Meanwhile, the “still better than Thaksin” mantra, has lost much of its charm.

While the most ardent supporters of the NCPO insist that this scandal was Thaksin’s plan to sabotage the government, many finally woke up to reality and grieved that their sacrifice during the Bangkok Shutdown campaign of 2014 had been wasted.

But what can one do against a corrupt junta? No courts will try the case and the public cannot recall the previous government. Hopefully, Thais will learn that only a good ‘checks-and-balances’ system and a democratic culture can make Thailand transparent; not a benevolent dictator.

They should push for more democracy, not less. But at present, Thais can only wait for the NCPO’s mercy to step down.

Prasit Wongtibun is a pen name. The author is an observer of Thai politics and law.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sat Dec 05, 2015 1:47 pm

from HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/12/03/tha ... my-torture" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Thailand: Investigate Alleged Army Torture
End Detention of Civilians in Military Bases

Thai authorities should promptly and impartially investigate the alleged torture of suspects in military detention, Human Rights Watch said today. To prevent further abuses, the government should immediately transfer all civilians detained at military facilities to officially recognized civilian places of detention.

The case of Prathin Chanket, 60, a former border patrol officer, is the latest alleged mistreatment in military custody. Prathin told his lawyer that after soldiers arrested him in Khon Kaen province on November 21, 2015, he was taken to a local army camp for two days before being transferred to an undisclosed army base. He said military interrogators slapped his face and kicked his legs to extract information and force him to confess to making lese majeste (insulting the monarchy) comments and being involved in plots against the ruling National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) junta. They alleged that Prathin was seeking to assassinate Prime Minister Gen. Prayut Chan-ocha and sabotage the “Bike For Dad” cycling event to be hosted by the government on December 11 to commemorate the King’s birthday.

Prathin said that while at the army base, officials mostly kept him blindfolded and did not allow any contact with the outside world. His whereabouts could only be confirmed when the army handed him over to the police on November 26. The authorities paraded Prathin and another suspect in the same case, Nathapol Nawanle, 26, in front of cameras at a press conference. The Bangkok Military Court ordered the two placed in pretrial detention at the 11th Army Circle military base in Bangkok. There, Prathin was allowed to have only one brief meeting with his lawyer. He was brought to the meeting room with a hood placed over his head, hands and feet shackled, and accompanied by armed soldiers.

Human Rights Watch and the International Commission of Jurists submitted a letter to the Thai government on November 24, raising serious concerns regarding conditions at the 11th Army Circle military base after the recent deaths of fortune teller Suriyan Sucharitpolwong and Police Maj. Prakrom Warunprapa, both charged with lese majeste, during their detention there. On the same day, the Southeast Asia Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights called for the immediate closure of this detention facility and an independent investigation into these custodial death cases.

The government has so far denied requests by human rights groups to visit detainees and examine conditions at the 11th Army Circle military base and other military detention facilities. Thai authorities have also failed to conduct serious and credible inquiries of alleged torture and other abuses in military detention.

The risk of torture and other serious abuses significantly increases when detainees are held incommunicado in military detention. Since the May 2014 coup, the NCPO junta has detained hundreds of politicians, activists, journalists, and people they accuse of supporting the deposed government, disrespecting or offending the monarchy, or being involved in anti-junta protests and activities. Many of these people have been held incommunicado in military camps where they have been interrogated without safeguards against torture and other ill-treatment.

“The Thai government’s use of military detention is a serious problem that should immediately end,” Adams said. “The government’s failure to heed concerns from the UN and human rights groups that civilians are at risk of serious abuses in military custody shows that the junta is leading Thailand into pariah state status

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Dhammanando » Thu Dec 10, 2015 2:08 am


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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Dhammanando » Fri Dec 11, 2015 4:48 am

It gets sillier every day. This is almost worthy of Onion ...

Thai man arrested for Facebook ‘like’ of doctored royal photo
  • Thanakorn Siripaiboon, 27, a worker in a car-parts factory, was arrested in Samut Prakan, near Bangkok, and charged with sedition, lese-majeste and computer crimes, said Col Burin Thongprapai, a legal officer for the junta.

    “On 2 December, he clicked ‘like’ on a doctored photo of the King and shared it with 608 friends,” Burin said, adding that he had confessed to the charges and faced up to 32 years in jail.

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by retrofuturist » Fri Dec 11, 2015 7:31 am

Greetings bhante,

Indeed, that is ridiculous.

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Fri Dec 11, 2015 2:47 pm

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35058414" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-3505841" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



4has told the BBC he plans to seek political asylum in Australia.
Paween Pongsirin was appointed to investigate trafficking networks after the discovery of mass graves at migrant camps earlier this year.
Now in Melbourne, he said he fled Thailand because influential figures implicated in trafficking wanted him killed.
He quit the Thai police last month.
Maj Gen Paween said that his investigation, which wound up after five months, was halted by influential people in the government, military and police.
His investigation resulted in more than 150 arrest warrants issued - including for politicians, policemen and military figures - and trials have begun in Thailand

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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Fri Dec 11, 2015 3:50 pm

Dhammanando wrote:It gets sillier every day. This is almost worthy of Onion ...

Thai man arrested for Facebook ‘like’ of doctored royal photo
  • Thanakorn Siripaiboon, 27, a worker in a car-parts factory, was arrested in Samut Prakan, near Bangkok, and charged with sedition, lese-majeste and computer crimes, said Col Burin Thongprapai, a legal officer for the junta.

    “On 2 December, he clicked ‘like’ on a doctored photo of the King and shared it with 608 friends,” Burin said, adding that he had confessed to the charges and faced up to 32 years in jail.
http://www.prachatai.com/english/node/5686" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
junta to charge hundreds more with lèse majesté for pressing ‘like’ on Facebook

After the Thai junta’s legal office filed lèse majesté and sedition charges against a factory worker for pressing ‘like’ on Facebook, the police have announced that hundreds more will be charged with lèse majesté for similar actions.

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gavesako
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by gavesako » Fri Dec 11, 2015 4:07 pm

robertk wrote:http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35058414" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-3505841" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


4has told the BBC he plans to seek political asylum in Australia.
Paween Pongsirin was appointed to investigate trafficking networks after the discovery of mass graves at migrant camps earlier this year.
Now in Melbourne, he said he fled Thailand because influential figures implicated in trafficking wanted him killed.
He quit the Thai police last month.
Maj Gen Paween said that his investigation, which wound up after five months, was halted by influential people in the government, military and police.
His investigation resulted in more than 150 arrest warrants issued - including for politicians, policemen and military figures - and trials have begun in Thailand

And the comedy continues with another act:

Police Weigh Defamation Suit Against Human Trafficking Investigator
http://www.khaosodenglish.com/detail.ph ... 6&section=" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:jedi:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

Access to Insight - Theravada texts
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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Mon Dec 14, 2015 5:42 pm

http://www.khaosodenglish.com/detail.ph ... 1450111767" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
… suspected lese majeste offender Thanakorn Siripaiboon has been accused of violating the law against defaming the monarchy by spreading “sarcastic” content which mocked … the [k]ing’s dog, Tong Daeng.

[Prosecutors stated that] … On Dec. 6, 2015, the suspect copied three images from Twitter and spread it on [his] personal Facebook…. These are images which contain sarcastic contents about the royal dog….

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Tue Dec 15, 2015 1:45 pm

http://www.dw.com/en/military-rule-jeop ... a-18916631" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Military rule jeopardizing Thailand's future
Since it seized power last year, the Thai military has been ruling the country without success. While Thailand finds itself increasingly isolated internationally, criticism of any sort is punished with harsh sentences.

People recognize that Thailand is globally more isolated and that the country's economy is stagnating. This is leading to growing discontent among Thais," said the anonymous analyst.

Introducing reforms?
Many also believe that repression in the junta-ruled country has increased in recent weeks. "The military is attempting to strengthen its hold on power by spreading fear," said the anonymous observer.
Pravit points out that the suppression of freedom of expression and the introduction of reforms by a small group of power-wielding elites are precluding the much-needed social discourse in Thailand. "As a result, one cannot expect that the reforms will be successful and will be accepted by the citizens."

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