Martial Law in Thailand

A place to bring a contemplative / Dharmic perspective and opinions to current events and politics.
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Kim OHara
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Kim OHara » Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:22 am

Thailand’s telecommunications regulator has approved in principle a plan to issue special sim cards to foreign tourists so they can be tracked via their mobile phones.

Officials at the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission said the plan would apply to tourists only, backtracking on an earlier announcement that it would cover all foreigners, including residents on long-term visas, the Bangkok Post and other media reported.

The commission said the plan would be studied further. Foreign and Thai users are already required to register when purchasing sim cards.

State surveillance of online activity is high under the military government installed after a coup in 2014, and there have been dozens of arrests for posting political material on Facebook and other sites.

The commission’s secretary general, Thakorn Tanthasit, suggested that the plan would not only help catch terrorists and criminals but also help find travellers who were in trouble or had gone missing.

...His failure to explain details of the plan has caused scepticism, since it is unclear how the special cards would differ from normal sim cards, which can already be used for tracking phones. He was not available to answer repeated calls to his office.

AIS, the country’s leading mobile phone service provider, said it would be “happy to comply” with the plan if it helped to ensure national stability. It noted the existing requirement for everyone, Thai and foreigner alike, to register when buying a sim card.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/ ... k-tourists

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Kim

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Tue Dec 20, 2016 8:16 am

http://www.newmandala.org/inching-toward-orwell/

Since the coup in May 2014, the NCPO has engaged in information warfare. Activists are monitored and persecuted making a large-scale public demonstration impossible. The battle then moves online. Prayuth and his cabinet are constantly ridiculed. His grumpy expression makes a perfect meme.

But the Internet battlefield offers more than silly harassment. It is the lifeline for dissent against Prayuth. In one example, soldiers kidnapped a student activist at midnight outside a university. Within seconds, the news spread to the network of activists at the university, then on to the network of international human rights groups and news agencies. A short while later the detainee was released at the police station. The prompt online reaction probably saved that student from a forced disappearance.

Moreover, the Prayuth administration is porous. Leaks of confidential documents have led to allegations of exorbitant spending, nepotism, and cronyism in his government. Prayuth’s nephew won lucrative construction contracts from the Third Army Region where Prayuth’s brother had been the commander. Prawit Wonsuwan, the Deputy Prime Minister overseeing security, flew to Hawaii on a luxurious 20-million baht trip. The former Army Commander was also involved in the notorious Rajbhakti Park scandal. Cronyism, corruption, and conflicts of interest badly delegitimise a regime that relies primarily on moral authority. When Prayuth is unable to stop this behaviour, the alternative solution is to block the public from receiving this damaging information.

There is no doubt that the model of Internet censorship the NCPO wishes to follow is that of China or North Korea. But those two countries have the advantage of an early start. Their Internet monitoring systems were developed alongside the arrival of the Internet. Alternative platforms replace the prohibited ones. Millions of employees have been hired to monitor the virtual world. Thailand proves more difficult because Thais are already spoiled with access to the online world. Thais are among the most heavily addicted to social media. Depriving them of Internet freedom would surely create a backlash.

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Mr Man
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Mr Man » Thu Dec 22, 2016 8:17 am

Thai military trains kindergarten children junta's 12 nationalistic Thai values
The Royal Thai Army has conducted a program to educate kindergarten children to be patriotic through the junta’s controversial nationalistic 12 Thai Values.

Love for the nation, religions and monarchy
Honesty, patience and good intentions for the public
Gratitude to parents, guardians and teachers
Perseverance in learning
Conservation of Thai culture
Morality and sharing with others
Correct understanding of democracy with the monarch as head of the state
Discipline and respect for the law and elders
Awareness in thinking and doing things, and following the guidance of His Majesty the King
Living by the sufficiency economy philosophy guided by His Majesty the King
Physical and mental strength against greed
Concern about the public and national good more than self-interest.
http://prachatai.org/english/node/6798

Disciple
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Disciple » Thu Dec 22, 2016 8:21 am

Mr Man wrote:Thai military trains kindergarten children junta's 12 nationalistic Thai values
The Royal Thai Army has conducted a program to educate kindergarten children to be patriotic through the junta’s controversial nationalistic 12 Thai Values.

Love for the nation, religions and monarchy
Honesty, patience and good intentions for the public
Gratitude to parents, guardians and teachers
Perseverance in learning
Conservation of Thai culture
Morality and sharing with others
Correct understanding of democracy with the monarch as head of the state
Discipline and respect for the law and elders
Awareness in thinking and doing things, and following the guidance of His Majesty the King
Living by the sufficiency economy philosophy guided by His Majesty the King
Physical and mental strength against greed
Concern about the public and national good more than self-interest.
http://prachatai.org/english/node/6798
Very good. I don't see anything wrong with that.

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robertk
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Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by robertk » Sun May 21, 2017 6:55 am

As if to prove the Thai military are mental, they have just stated that even looking at jailing viewers of any webpage that has comments they find 'seditious' (almost anything that supports democracy) or lese majeste.

http://m.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1 ... eb-viewers

Police are clamping down on lese majeste offences by shifting their focus to viewers of illegal content even if they do not post or share it.

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Kim OHara
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Location: North Queensland, Australia

Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Kim OHara » Mon Oct 09, 2017 12:00 pm

Elections postponed again in another backflip -
Coup leader and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has "clarified" a joint statement he made with US President Donald Trump that a long-awaited election would be held next year.

It won't. ...
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-09/t ... nt/9032042

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Kim

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Kim OHara
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Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:47 am
Location: North Queensland, Australia

Re: Martial Law in Thailand

Post by Kim OHara » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:14 am

Historian? Nobel nominee? 85 years old? Doesn't matter - still being charged for casting doubt on the historical accuracy of a favourite Thai myth:
The story of a former Thai king slaying a Burmese prince in a duel while riding elephants is at the centre of a police investigation against an elderly Buddhist intellectual who faces 15 years jail for questioning the historical accuracy of the event.

Sulak Sivaraksa, 85, made the comments at a university seminar in 2014 and was charged then, but the case has resurfaced, with police saying they have now finished their investigation.

This week police escorted Mr Sulak to meet the prosecutor, who will decide whether to go ahead with the case.

He is charged with lese majeste, which protects the king, queen, heir and regent from defamation, but has been more broadly applied to cover the king's dog, past kings and even Facebook "likes" of controversial material.

Mr Sulak insists he has done nothing wrong.

"My point is, if you want to learn history, you have to get all facts from the past as much as you can, and I just state the facts," he said.
The case comes just before the cremation of Thailand's widely-revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej later this month, but Mr Sulak said he was not sure why the charges had been revived.

"Well, I wish I knew," he said.

"The country is run by dictatorship so [there's] no regard to the rule of law and for the army, King Naresuan is a great hero, you see, and the elephant combat is real for them."

Mr Sulak is a renowned social critic and the founder of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists. He has been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize.

His autobiography - Loyalty Demands Dissent - contains a foreword from the Dalai Lama.

Although he describes himself as a royalist, he has been charged several times with lese majeste. ...

On December 7, the prosecutor will announce whether to go ahead with the case against Mr Sulak.

If it does go ahead, the trial would be held in a military court, possibly in secret.

"So I'm at the mercy of the military tribunal... if they want to be fair, if they want to be sincere I'll get acquitted, but if they want to punish me, well, what can you do? There's no rule of law," Mr Sulak said.
More: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-12/b ... ge/9040540

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Kim

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