The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

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rajitha7
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:40 am

Dhammanando wrote: The Pure Dhamma website offers a variety of revisionist readings of the Pali Suttas based upon the site-owner’s (or his guru’s) claimed re-discovery of supposed hidden meanings of key Pali terms.
Well, the biggest "revision" is not in words but in the method.

For example last week you would have gone to a meditation room, sat down cross-legged and observed breathing thinking it's going to "enlighten" you. You indicated that -> [here]

So just like you, for generations many have done the wrong thing taking a lead from the Visudhimagga. Now that I have shown you the correct way it would be silly to go back and observe your breathing isn't it? Unless Ven. Waharaka and the Puredhamma site came along you'd still be huffing and puffing away hoping to irradicate fetters.
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:04 am

rajitha7 wrote:Well, I will answer it for you. The answer is a.

a) All worldly things are without substance.

The answer (b) does not make sense because "self" is a reference to a person. So "Dhamma" forerunner does not make sense because even non-biological things are Dhamma.
SarathW wrote:What I am more interesting know is whether Nibbana is included in Sabbe Dhamma according to Ven. Abhaya?
Following, from the above.

- All worldly things are without substance (Anatta).
- Nibbana, on the other hand, has substance (Atta).
“Sabbe sankhara anicca“ - all sankhara cannot be maintained to one’s satisfaction
“Sabbe sankhara dukkha“ - all sankhara eventually lead to dukkha
“Sabbe dhamma anatta“ - all dhamma are without substance at the end
According to Abhidhamma, Sabbe Dhamma consists of Nibbana. Ven. Abhaya highly recommends Abhidhamma. So why you do not want to accept it?
Because if you accept this, all your arguments come to a hogwash.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

Lal
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2016 11:39 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Lal » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:16 am

Hi Sarath,

SarathW said
How do you translate "Sabbe Dhamma Anatta" as per your (or Ven. Abhaya) interpretation? Does "Sabbe Dhamma" include Nibbana?
This is discussed at:
https://puredhamma.net/key-dhamma-conce ... -sankhara/
As explained there, Nibbana is not included in Dhamma.

SarathW said,
I also like to thank Lal for the development of the website without which we will not be able to discuss the views held by Waharaka lineage which is gathering a large following in Sri Lanka.
Thank you for your reassuring words. I normally don’t go to discussion boards due to this problem. It is amazing to see how intolerable some are of views that are different from theirs, but I did not expect that kind of response from bhikkhus, whom I venerate in the name of the Sariputta, moggalana lineage. I recently came back to this forum because Dr. Snyder asked me to. If he asks me to stay out, or if I feel that my time here would be a waste of time, I will.

Pali is “phonetic language” (sounds give the meanings in most cases, especially for key the words). It comes from Magadhi (Maga Adhi or Noble Path) that the Buddha spoke. It has no grammar like most other languages, even though people have tried over the past hundreds of years. Furthermore, Pali does not have its own alphabet either. When the Tipitaka was written down 2000 years ago, it was written in Pali with Sinhala script. It is good to know a bit of historical background:
https://puredhamma.net/historical-background/

The fact that Pali does not pay much attention to grammar can be clearly seen in the verses, “Buddhan Saranan gachchami“, “Dhamman Saranan gachchami”, etc.
- There is no subject in those sentences. The first of course means, “I take the refuge in the Buddha”, but “I” is missing in “Buddhan Saranan gachchami“. It is just understood.
- If you look at suttas, there is no clear grammatical structure. It is the sound that gives the meaning and most verses have “double meanings”. Most people just see the conventional meaning in some verses, which really have very deep meanings.

Buddha Dhamma is to be learned with understanding of the key concepts: dasa akusala (of which micca ditthi is the most important, but not many people pay attention to), anicca, dukkha, anatta, etc. Without that key understanding one cannot go beyond “moral living”. There are two Eightfold Paths as described in the Maha Chattarisaka sutta:
https://puredhamma.net/sutta-interpreta ... eat-forty/
Most people today are on the mundane Path, because they have not been even exposed to Tilakkhana. To start on the Lokottara Path, one needs to first comprehend anicca, dukkha,anatta.

Anyway, I do not intend to engage in “debates” here or anywhere else. That will lower the value of the Buddha Dhamma. The Buddha said trying to “sell” Dhamma, i.e., try to persuade another who is not willing to listen or to reason out, is like chasing a woman who has said “no”.
I will not respond to any derogatory remarks. It is not that I am offended (I really am not, just saddened), it is just that Buddha Dhamma requires respect. One does not listen to a desana with the shoes or a hat on. Trying to put down others in a discussion, and even worse try to “shut down” the other side, does not serve any purpose. Bringing down a Dhamma discussion to a “political like” debate by attacking the other side is demeaning to Buddha Dhamma.

But I am willing to clarify any issues that anyone has with my postings here or at my site. I know that many people have legitimate questions, since this interpretation is new and different for many. Please keep in mind that the Buddha said “my Dhamma has never been known to the world”: “pubbe ananustutesu Dhammesu..”. If it is so easy to grasp, we don’t need a Buddha in the world.
It is easy for a normal human to comprehend anicca as “impermanent”, for example, rather than “it is not possible to maintain things to one’s satisfaction in this world”; The deeper meaning takes time to comprehend, because one needs to spend time and contemplate long. That is why true Dhamma is kept hidden for long times until an Ariya like Ven. Waharaka Thero bring the true meanings out once in a long time. But if grasped, that will change one forever, because then one will be a Sotapanna.

Please post any questions any of you have in this link if possible. Even when I don’t have much time to check other discussions, I will visit this link to check. This is one way to pay gratitude to my late Noble teacher, Waharaka Thero.

With metta, Lal

rajitha7
Posts: 243
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:17 am

SarathW wrote:According to Abhidhamma, Sabbe Dhamma consists of Nibbana..
Dhamma's are "things".

- Sabbe Dhamma infers all "things" in the mundane world.
- Abhidhamma infers all "things" in both mundane and supermundane worlds.
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:11 pm

rajitha7 wrote:
SarathW wrote:According to Abhidhamma, Sabbe Dhamma consists of Nibbana..
Dhamma's are "things".

- Sabbe Dhamma infers all "things" in the mundane world.
- Abhidhamma infers all "things" in both mundane and supermundane worlds.
So Nibbana without substance or fruitless, according to Ven. Abhaya?
If Nibbana is not a Dhamma we will not be able to experience it while we alive.
Last edited by SarathW on Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

SarathW
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:26 pm

Please post any questions any of you have in this link if possible. Even when I don’t have much time to check other discussions, I will visit this link to check. This is one way to pay gratitude to my late Noble teacher, Waharaka Thero.
Thank you. Please be assured Dhamma Wheel is a friendly and tolerant discussion group. Without salt, curry will not be very tasty. :D However too much salt will spoil the soup which I agree.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

SarathW
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:28 pm

As explained there, Nibbana is not included in Dhamma.
Perhaps you are right but contradict Abhidhamma.
If Nibbana is not Dhamma how do we experience it when we alive?
I wish to Know what Ven. Abaya's view on this.
Last edited by SarathW on Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

SarathW
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:37 pm

Hi Lal,
The main concern here is the meaning of Anatta. To me, the meaning of Anatta is summarised in Anatta Lakhana sutta. The following phrase clearly demonstrate that Anatta means taking things as I, me or myself.(ie. self-view)
=============
"Now, what is impermanent, unsatisfactory, subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: 'This is mine, this I am, this is myself'?

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .mend.html


“Yaṃ panāniccaṃ dukkhaṃ vipari­ṇāma­dhammaṃ, kallaṃ nu taṃ samanupassituṃ: ‘etaṃ mama, esohamasmi, eso me attā’”
ti? “No hetaṃ, bhante”.

https://suttacentral.net/pi/sn22.59
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

rajitha7
Posts: 243
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:27 pm

SarathW wrote:
rajitha7 wrote:
SarathW wrote:According to Abhidhamma, Sabbe Dhamma consists of Nibbana..
Dhamma's are "things".

- Sabbe Dhamma infers all "things" in the mundane world.
- Abhidhamma infers all "things" in both mundane and supermundane worlds.
So Nibbana without substance or fruitless, according to Ven. Abhaya?
If Nibbana is not a Dhamma we will not be able to experience it while we alive.
How can Nibbana be fruitless? Did you think about that?

Learn to pick the nuances. There are nuances everywhere. When we generally discuss Dhammas it's the mundane ones we discuss. However, in the context of Abhidhamma the scope of the Dhammas expand to include Nibbana.

The Dhammas Ven. Abhaya infers do not have Nibbana included.
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

rajitha7
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:58 pm

“Yaṃ panāniccaṃ dukkhaṃ vipari­ṇāma­dhammaṃ, kallaṃ nu taṃ samanupassituṃ: ‘etaṃ mama, esohamasmi, eso me attā’”
ti? “No hetaṃ, bhante”.


The Incorrect translation

"Now, what is impermanent, unsatisfactory, subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: 'This is mine, this I am, this is myself'?

The correct translation

"Now, what is impermanent, unsatisfactory, subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: 'This is mine, this I am, this is beneficial'?
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:11 pm

The Dhammas Ven. Abhaya infers do not have Nibbana included.
What is his interpretation of Dhamma?
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

rajitha7
Posts: 243
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:11 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote: Avoiding dasa akusala is indeed vital. However, atta means self, and anatta means not-self. Attha means welfare or benefit, while anattha means without welfare or benefit. The ten unwholesome deeds are entirely without welfare or benefit.
anattha/anattha = means no welfare or benefit
atta/attha = means the opposite - has benefit.

I am sorry, but Lal was correct all along. You seem to think there are two meanings here. Although there is only one.
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:55 am

Then in the very next sutta, Attha Sutta (AN 181; in the Sadhuvagga) anattä is defined in terms of dasa akusala:
Can you provide the Sutta link in Sutta Central?
I want to compare Pali and English translation and perhaps Sinhala translation.

==========
I found the following. But I cant find the English translation.

134. “Bhikkhus, I will teach the profitable and the unprofitable, listen and attend to it carefully.

“Bhikkhus, what is unprofitable?

Wrong view, wrong thoughts, wrong speech, wrong actions, wrong livelihood, wrong endeavour, wrong mindfulness, wrong concentration, wrong knowledge and wrong release. Bhikkhus, these ten are unprofitable.

Bhikkhus, these ten are profitable. What ten?

Right view, right thoughts, right speech, right actions, right livelihood, right endeavour, right mindfulness, right concentration, right knowledge and right release. Bhikkhus, these ten are profitable.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

rajitha7
Posts: 243
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:40 am

SarathW wrote:
The Dhammas Ven. Abhaya infers do not have Nibbana included.
What is his interpretation of Dhamma?
I said earlier, the mundane Dhammas.

I think the following example will show where the problem lies.

This is the correct version.
’’මහණෙනි, අර්ථය කවරේද? මනා දැනීම, මනා සිතීම, මනා වචන, මනා කර්‍මාන්තය, මනා ජීවිකාව, මනා වෑයම, මනා සිහිකිරීම, මනා සිත එකඟ කිරීම, මනා නුවණ, මනා මිදීම, වෙත්. මහණෙනි, මෙය අර්ථයයි කියනු ලැබේ.’’

https://suttacentral.net/si/an10.137
Although here it is incorrect.
“මහණෙනි, ඒ කුමකැයි සිතන්නහුද, රූපය නිත්‍ය හෝ වෙයිද? අනිත්‍ය හෝ වෙයිද?” “ස්වාමීනි, අනිත්‍යය,” “යමක් වනාහි අනිත්‍යද, එය දුක් හෝ සැප හෝ වේද?” “ස්වාමීනි දුකය,” “යමක් අනිත්‍යයද, දුකද පෙරලෙන සුලුද, එය මාගේය. එය මම වෙමි. එය මාගේ ආත්මයයි කියා දැකීමට සුදුසු වේද?” “ස්වාමීනි, එය නොවේමය.”

https://suttacentral.net/si/sn22.59
It should be thus,
“මහණෙනි, ඒ කුමකැයි සිතන්නහුද, රූපය නිත්‍ය හෝ වෙයිද? අනිත්‍ය හෝ වෙයිද?” “ස්වාමීනි, අනිත්‍යය,” “යමක් වනාහි අනිත්‍යද, එය දුක් හෝ සැප හෝ වේද?” “ස්වාමීනි දුකය,” “යමක් අනිත්‍යයද, දුකද පෙරලෙන සුලුද, එය මාගේය. එය මම වෙමි. එය අර්ථවත් කියා දැකීමට සුදුසු වේද?” “ස්වාමීනි, එය නොවේමය.”

https://suttacentral.net/si/sn22.59
Last edited by rajitha7 on Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:49 am

Ok thinks :D , I see your point, I hope Ven Dhammanando or Ven Pesala might give their thoughts on this.
By the way, if Nibbana is not Dhamma how can you experience it in this life?
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

rajitha7
Posts: 243
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:14 am

Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rajitha7 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:59 am

SarathW wrote:if Nibbana is not Dhamma how can you experience it in this life?
Nibbana is a Dhamma accessible or experienced at a transcendental or super-mundane level. It's not a Dhamma that can be experienced at the mundane level. That is why we are all meditating to reach it.

If it was part of mundane life we can obtain Nibbana just as you would purchase groceries isn't it?
Unsurpassed is the Lord’s way of teaching the Dhamma concerning one’s proper moral conduct. One should be honest and faithful, without deception, chatter, hinting or belittling, not always ready to add gain to gain, but with the sense-doors guarded, moderate in food, a promoter of peace, observant, active and strenuous in effort, a meditator, mindful, with proper conversation, steady-going, resolute and sensible, not hankering after sense pleasures, but mindful and prudent. This is the unsurpassed teaching concerning a person’s proper ethical conduct. - Sampasādanīya, Dīgha Nikāya 28

SarathW
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:19 am

So Buddha Dhamma is not Dhamma?
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

freedom
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by freedom » Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:16 pm

When the mind completely turned away, cut off from anything related to "I, me, my, myself", there is no more suffering. One has realized nibbana.

When there is no such thing as "I, me, my, myself" in one's mind, "self" does not applied, "no/not self" does not applied. "I exist" does not applied, "I do not exist" does not applied. "I am this" does not applied, "I am not that" does not applied. Just as if one never has any "son" in one's mind, "that is my son" does not applied, "that is not my son" does not applied.
One should not be negligent of discernment, should guard the truth, be devoted to relinquishment, and train only for calm - MN 140.

SarathW
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by SarathW » Fri Apr 07, 2017 9:57 pm

Lal wrote:Hi Sarath,
You said,
"Now, those that are impermanent, unsatisfactory, subject to change, is it proper to regard them as: 'They are mine, this I am, this is my self'?"

"Indeed, not that, O Lord."
The Pali verse is, "Yaṃ pan aniccam dukham viparinama dhamman, kallam nu tam samanupassitum: ‘etan mama, éso hamasmi, éso mé attati?"

The key is to see whether translating anicca and anatta as "impermanence" and "no-self" is correct. In the above "atta" in attati is the opposite of anatta.


With metta, Lal

The important factor of Anicca, Dukkha and Anatta is to not take things subject to these qualities as I, me and myself.
That is the self-view.
But Ven. Abhaya never bothers to point this factor to his flowers.
What is the reason for that?
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

Lal
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Lal » Fri Apr 07, 2017 11:51 pm

I see several comments, so I will try to get to the root of the issue.

1. The main point to understand is that a given word can have many different meanings depending on the context; that is true also for English words. Let me give some examples with English words to make it clear.
 right: You were right./Make a right turn at the light.
 rose: My favorite flower is a rose./He quickly rose from his seat.
 type: He can type over 100 words per minute. /That dress is really not her type.
So, words can have different meanings depending on where they are used. This is what I said about the word "atta" in my previous posts.

Dhamma can have following meanings depending on the context:
- Dhamma is all that we experience with our mind: “mananca paticca dhammeca uppddati mano vinnanam”. This is like experiencing rupa with eyes: “cakkhunca paticca rupeca uppaddati cakkhu vinnanam”. This is the Dhamma that is relevant to “sabbe dhamma anatta”.
-Dhamma in Dhamma/Adhamma (good things and bad things). Dasa akusala are Adhamma; kusala are Dhamma.
- Buddha Dhamma is the Dhamma that leads to stopping rebirth (Buddha comes from "bhava uddha").
Of course, all dhammas are included in the first definition, including Buddha Dhamma. Remember that the Buddha said, “even the Buddha Dhamma needs to be given up after reaching Nibbana. Just like one leaves the raft that one used to cross a river (and does not carry it after reaching safety), one needs to let go of Dhamma after reaching Nibbana”.
So, Buddha Dhamma is also Dhamma, but it needs to be used for a specific purpose. After that one does not need that either. In the days of the Buddha, when a bhikkhu attains Nibbana, he/she goes to the Buddha and says, “Bhante, there is nothing else to be done”. He/she has no further use of Buddha Dhamma.

2. SarathW said,
By the way, if Nibbana is not Dhamma how can you experience it in this life?
When one attains Arahanthood, that is not “full Nibbana” (anupadisesa Nibbana), but only saupadisesa Nibbana. Because one still lives in this world, one has still has to experience Dhamma, i.e., an Arahant can experience the world with the five physical senses and also the mind via “mananca paticca dhammeca uppddati mano vinnanam”. An Arahant, or even a Buddha will even experience bodily pains, sicknesses, etc because until death they all live in this world of 31 realms.
At the death of the Arahant, all ties this world (all 31 realms) are cutoff and one attains “full Nibbana” or “complete release”.
Of course, an Arahant can experience Nibbana when in Nirodha Samapatti, up to seven days at time.

Full Nibbana cannot be described in terms anything that is associated with this world (citta, cetasika, rupa).

3. SarathW said,
Then in the very next sutta, Attha Sutta (AN 181; in the Sadhuvagga) anattä is defined in terms of dasa akusala:
Can you provide the Sutta link in Sutta Central?

https://suttacentral.net/pi/an10.137
Here is an important post on this:
https://puredhamma.net/key-dhamma-conce ... ical-link/


If I missed any other issue in the above discussion, please let me know.
With metta, Lal
Last edited by Lal on Sat Apr 08, 2017 10:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

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