The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

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TRobinson465
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by TRobinson465 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:05 pm

budo wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:49 am
TRobinson465 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:34 am
2600htz wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:53 pm
Hello:

Come on, let the guy be, all the forum ganging up against Lal its pretty rude.

Regards.
I agree its rude, although to be fair pretty much all of the forum is like this for anything that doesnt fit within mainstream DW doctrine (or as DW ppl would say "the suttas" because their interpretation of the suttas is always right). There's surprisingly very little religious tolerance on here. Its something you just have to learn to accept. forums in general sorta have this culture of suppressing "unorthodox" views on a subject via ganging up unless that forum's moderators dont allow that.
Well people become more assertive when the person they're questioning / challenging always responds with

- You have not refuted my theory
- I don't have time to explain
- Here are 100 articles you should read (i don't have time, but you have time)
- You cannot uncover true and pure Buddha dhamma
- <insert shaming empty language>


What do you think will happen? All exchanges and interaction must be reciprocal otherwise people lose interest or trust.
Yes these kind of things will certainly escalate things. I'm just pointing out it's not like this is the only thread that's like this. (In terms of every1 ganging up on one person). There have been quite a few on the forum and u pretty much just have to accept it.
"Do not have blind faith, but also no blind criticism" - the 14th Dalai Lama

"At Varanasi, in the Deer Park at Isipatana, the Blessed One has set in motion the unexcelled Wheel of Dhamma that cannot be stopped by brahmins, devas, Maras, Brahmas or anyone in the cosmos." -Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

"Go forth, monks, for the good of the many, for the happiness of the many, out of compassion for the world, for the welfare, the good and the happiness of gods and men. Let no two of you go in the same direction." - First Khandhaka, Chapter 11, Vinaya.

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budo
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by budo » Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:13 pm

rajitha7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:17 pm
WorldTraveller wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:28 am
Pali > sabbe dhammā anattā
Sujato > all things are not-self
So plug-in a non-living thing to "things" and see if it make sense isn't it?

It would make sense like this.

"All house hold items have no soul" <- Something along these lines! A Buddha usually emerges to state the non-obvious.
WorldTraveller wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:28 am
According to your baloney, kusala or useful mental states such as dhyana also without essence!
Kusala means shedding bad mind-states.
Jhana means burning off vignana,

They are action words - not phenomena or Dhamma.

Also read this NOW -> http://qr.ae/TUGDBI <- why does this matter?

Atto is a Sinhala word as well. It means "individual". So one who sees phenomena as fruitful (atta) is an "atto".
Hi that link says Jambudvipa is in the bible, but the reference they use is not the bible. Can you please provide me with the page and line where Jambudvipa is referenced in the bible?

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Sam Vara
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Sam Vara » Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:29 pm

budo wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:13 pm
rajitha7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:17 pm
WorldTraveller wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:28 am
Pali > sabbe dhammā anattā
Sujato > all things are not-self
So plug-in a non-living thing to "things" and see if it make sense isn't it?

It would make sense like this.

"All house hold items have no soul" <- Something along these lines! A Buddha usually emerges to state the non-obvious.
WorldTraveller wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:28 am
According to your baloney, kusala or useful mental states such as dhyana also without essence!
Kusala means shedding bad mind-states.
Jhana means burning off vignana,

They are action words - not phenomena or Dhamma.

Also read this NOW -> http://qr.ae/TUGDBI <- why does this matter?

Atto is a Sinhala word as well. It means "individual". So one who sees phenomena as fruitful (atta) is an "atto".
Hi that link says Jambudvipa is in the bible, but the reference they use is not the bible. Can you please provide me with the page and line where Jambudvipa is referenced in the bible?
I can't see any claim that Jambudipa is in the Bible; as you say, the reference is not to the Bible, but to a nineteenth-century Anglican cleric's commentary on the Bible. He seems to think that "Jambudipa" is the island now called Sri Lanka, but all other sources seem to point to it being a broader mythical area which includes modern India.
Jambudvīpa (Sanskrit: जम्बुद्वीप) is the dvīpa ("island" or "continent") of the terrestrial world, as envisioned in the cosmologies of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, which is the realm where ordinary human beings live.[3]

The word Jambudvīpa literally refers to "the land of Jambu trees" where jambu is the name of the species (also called Jambul or Indian Blackberry) and dvīpa means "island" or "continent".

Surya Siddhanta, an astronomical text, refers to Northern Hemisphere of the earth as Jambudvipa whereas the Southern hemisphere is referred to as Patala.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jambudvipa

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by WorldTraveller » Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:54 pm

Lal wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:14 am
Just making derogatory statements without evidence from the Tipitaka will not get us anywhere, and thus I will not answer those. Yes. Some have bowed out from the discussion at times, come back and bowed out again when they cannot answer.

This is not a debate but an effort to uncover the true and pure Dhamma taught by the Buddha. I will respond only if something worthwhile answering is posted. Buddha Dhamma is self-consistent and it is all there in the Tipitaka. No one will be able to dispute that.
I think you are targeting Ven. Dhammanando as here, he said, "Like Ven. Pesala I’ll make this my final contribution to this thread. Breaking butterflies on a wheel is boring." But posted again here. You should know, Ven. Dhammanando is a moderator and a monk. He surely has a right to intervene.
Lal wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:14 am
Some have bowed out from the discussion at times, come back and bowed out again when they cannot answer.
“To his own ruin the fool gains knowledge, for it destroys his innate goodness and cleaves his head.”

- Dhammapada 72
“Do not go by oral tradition, by lineage of teaching, by hearsay, by a canonical tradition, by logical reasoning, by inferential reasoning, by reasoned cogitation, by the acceptance of a view after pondering it, by the seeming competence of a speaker, or because you think: ‘The ascetic is our guru.’”
- Kālāma-sutta

rightviewftw
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rightviewftw » Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:11 pm

deletd
How to meditate: Anapanasati, Satipatthana.
Intro to General Semantics
Factors & Perceptions

Parallel Dhammapada Reading
Chinese to Eng Dhp
"The statements; 'With the remainderless stopping & fading of the six contact-media is it the case that there is anything else?' '.. is it the case that there is not anything else .. is it the case that there both is & is not anything else .. is it the case that there neither is nor is not anything else?' objectify non-objectification. However far the six contact-media go, that is how far objectification goes."

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Lal » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 am

Many of those who have commented do not seem to have read my posts. However, I am glad that many others have read and understood.

The following is another example of a wrong interpretation. Please read carefully before responding. Try to learn instead of making comments without reading. There is so much in Budha Dhamma that has been hidden. These are simple things to understand, once pointed out.

Difference Between Rupa and Rupakkhandha

1. Difference Between rūpa and rūpakkhandha is very important to understand. By translating rūpakkhandha as "form aggregate" gives the wrong impression that it is a collection of “solid objects”. Instead of memorizing Pāli words (or trying to find equivalent English words, which is impossible in many cases), we need to understand what is meant by such Pāli words and just use those Pāli words when there is ambiguity. Rūpakkhandha is all MENTAL. Again, please read carefully.

- In modern day terms, rūpa are either “matter” (human bodies, trees, houses, etc) OR “energy” (sound, heat, etc). With the Einstein’s formula of E = mc^2, modern science acknowledged that matter and energy are intrinsically the same.
- In terms of Buddha Dhamma, all those rūpa are made of suddhāshtaka, the “smallest unit of rūpa“. What is normally called “matter” like our bodies, as well as what is normally called “energy” (like sound, heat), are ALL made of suddhāshtaka. A suddhāshtaka is unimaginably small, billions of times smaller than an electron in modern science.

2. It also helps to understand what is meant by a “khandha“. In Pāli (and Sinhala) it means a “heap” or “pile”. In Sinhala, a hill or a “pile of things” is called a “kanda” (කන්ද). So, aggregate is not a bad translation for khandha (ඛන්ධ in Sinhala for the Pāli word).

- A heap or an aggregate of rūpa is a rūpa khandha. It rhymes as, “rūpakkhandha“. We have seen this in kind of combination of words (sandhi) in Pāli terms like Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta which is shortened for Dhamma Cakka Pavattana Sutta.
- Another example is dhammassavana shortened for “dhamma savana” or “listening to dhamma (discourse)”.

3. On the other hand, rūpakkhandha is all mental. The Khandha sutta (SN 22.48) (among many other suttas) summarizes what is included in the rūpakkhandha: “Yaṃ kiñci, bhikkhave, rūpaṃ atītā­nāgata­pac­cup­pan­naṃ (My comment: atita, anāgata, pacuppanna) ajjhattaṃ vā bahiddhā vā oḷārikaṃ vā sukhumaṃ vā hīnaṃ vā paṇītaṃ vā yaṃ dūre santike vā, ayaṃ vuccati rūpakkhandho.

Translated: Whatever kind of rūpa, whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, disliked or liked, far or near: this is called the rūpakkhandha".

- Eleven types of rūpa (mental impressions) are in the rūpakkhandha: past (atita), present (pacuppanna), future (anāgata), internal (ajjhatta), external (bahiddha), coarse (olārika), fine (sukuma), dislikes (hīna), likes (panita), far (dūre), near (santike).
- Other four kandhas or aggregates (vēdanā, saññā, sankhāra, and viññāna) have the same 11 categories.
An acceptable English translation of the Khandha sutta is available online: Khandha Sutta: Aggregates.

4. Let us discuss them a bit more detail to see that these rūpakkhandha are “mental impressions” of rūpa, and not the rūpa that are out there.

- Those rūpa that one has seen in the past is one’s atita rūpa, including anything that one ever saw (including in previous births).
Any rūpa about the future or an anāgata rūpa (for example, a sketch of the type of house one is thinking about building) can change with time. That does not even involve a real rūpa.
- Any rūpa that one is seeing at present time (pacuppanna rūpa) goes to the category of atita rūpa in a split second.

5. Internal (ajjhatta) rūpa are those that are part of oneself: all body parts, including the ones inside the body. External (bahiddha) rūpa are of course anything outside of one’s body. Coarse (olārika) rūpa are what we call “solid matter”, and fine (sukuma) rūpa are “energy” (heat, sound, etc).

- There are rūpa that one dislikes (hīna) and there are others that one likes (panita).
Some rūpa could be located far (dūre) and some could be located near (santike).
- Therefore, we see that there could be some overlaps between these categories.
- Many of these in the rūpakkhandha we have actually not even seen. For example, we have a mental impression of our heart, but we have not seen our own heart. We may not have seen some landmarks like Chinese great wall, but only pictures of them. Yet, we do have mental impressions of those.

6. Now we can see the main difference between rūpa and rūpakkhandha.

- A rūpa is either a solid object that one sees with one ‘s eyes or touches with one’s body (a person, a person’s body or a body part, a tree, a planet, star, etc) OR another form of sense input that we get through the other three sense doors (smells, tastes, or sounds).
rūpakkhandha are MENTAL IMPRESSIONS of those external rūpa. They are NOT tangible or have any energy in them. One’s rūpakkhandha is INFINITE, meaning that it has records of ALL one has seen in ALL past lives going back and back in time without “an actual beginning”.
- This is why those with iddhi (super normal) powers can recall events that took place billions of years ago. The Buddha of course recalled how he received first “niyata vivarana” or confirmation that he will become a Buddha trillions of years ago, from Buddha Deepankara.

7. Let us take another example to visualize this difference between actual rūpa and rūpakkhandha.

- I will take, as an example, the twin towers in New York that were destroyed in the 2001 terrorist attack.
If one had seen those twin towers in New York, one can still recall them in one’s mind. Those physical structures are not there anymore, but they are in one’s rūpakkhandha!
- But the actual rūpa that were there in New York are no longer there.

8. Since we have seen very different things in our lives (and in past lives), our rūpakkhandha are very different. Each has his/her own rūpakkhandha.

- In fact, we can see that each has his/her own vēdanākkhandha, saññākkhandha, sankhārakkhandha, and viññānakkhandha.
- All of them can be analyzed the same way. But all those (unlike some rūpa of solid matter) exist only while being experienced.

9. Without those mental impressions (pancakkhadha), we will not be able to live our lives.

- For example, we have seen, smelled, touched, and tasted apples in the past (we have also heard the sound that can be heard when one bites into an apple. They are all in our pancakkhandha, and our minds automatically use those past records to identify an apple INSTANTLY.
- We discussed this recently in the post, “The Amazing Mind – Critical Role of Nāmagotta (Memories)“.
- All those concepts that we have discussed fit in well in this jigsaw puzzle of the workings of the mind. It is very complex, but once one understands the basics it becomes much easier.

10. Therefore, there is nothing wrong with recalling past events. The problem arises when we get attached to them, and start re-creating those events in our minds and enjoy them.

- Kamma (which lead to kamma vipāka) are created three ways: manō kamma, vaci kamma, and kāya kamma. These are actually done via manō sankhara, vaci sankhara, and kāya sankhara.
- Mano kamma (our spontaneous thoughts) arise automatically according to our gati.
- Vaci kamma (“talking to ourselves” and speech) arise due to conscious thoughts.
- kāya kamma (thoughts that lead to bodily actions) arise also due to conscious thoughts and have the highest javana power; see, “Javana of a Citta – The Root of Mental Power“.
- May people think “talking to ourselves” or “day dreaming” is not bad because we don’t actually physically do anything. Even though they are less potent than kāya kamma, vaci kamma can add up and lead to strong kamma vipāka.

11. When we “day dream”, we mostly recall a past event that we enjoyed and re-experience that again and again. Also, one could make up a “future event” that one would LIKE TO experience and that also becomes a part of pancakkhandha (this is the “anāgata” component in #3 above).

- Then one keeps generating more and more vaci sankhara on that event; see, “Correct Meaning of Vacī Sankhāra“. Of course, if we get “really into it”, we may do kāya sankhara too.
- That is called “pancaupādānakkhandha” (panca upādāna khandha). In other words, one is now “pulling that event back, close to one’s mind” and consciously generating more vaci (and possibly kāya) sankhara.
- This is why “upādāna” is such an important step in a paticca samuppada cycle. The two steps of “tanhā paccayā upādāna” and “upādāna paccayā bhava” really involves many , many paticca samuppada cycles running inside them.

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rightviewftw » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:02 pm

Lal wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 am
... many others have read and understood.
i wonder what makes you think that?
How to meditate: Anapanasati, Satipatthana.
Intro to General Semantics
Factors & Perceptions

Parallel Dhammapada Reading
Chinese to Eng Dhp
"The statements; 'With the remainderless stopping & fading of the six contact-media is it the case that there is anything else?' '.. is it the case that there is not anything else .. is it the case that there both is & is not anything else .. is it the case that there neither is nor is not anything else?' objectify non-objectification. However far the six contact-media go, that is how far objectification goes."

kstan1122
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by kstan1122 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 2:37 am

rightviewftw wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:02 pm
Lal wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 am
... many others have read and understood.
i wonder what makes you think that?
The logic is quite simple, when there is doubt people will ask questions.

Just like you are not sure when Lal states that "many others have read and understood", so you ask the question.

WorldTraveller
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by WorldTraveller » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:21 am

kstan1122 wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 2:37 am
rightviewftw wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:02 pm
Lal wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 am
... many others have read and understood.
i wonder what makes you think that?
The logic is quite simple, when there is doubt people will ask questions.

Just like you are not sure when Lal states that "many others have read and understood", so you ask the question.
Alternatively: The logic is quite simple, when there is "pure crap reputation" people will not ask questions.

Just like two venerables and some members stated that they will not bother about this thread.
“Do not go by oral tradition, by lineage of teaching, by hearsay, by a canonical tradition, by logical reasoning, by inferential reasoning, by reasoned cogitation, by the acceptance of a view after pondering it, by the seeming competence of a speaker, or because you think: ‘The ascetic is our guru.’”
- Kālāma-sutta

kstan1122
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by kstan1122 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:05 am

WorldTraveller wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:21 am

Alternatively: The logic is quite simple, when there is "pure crap reputation" people will not ask questions.
There are two types of people who do not ask questions:

Type one are those who has alobha, adosa and amoha.
Type two are those who has lobha, dosa, and moha.

Type one are those who has wisdom and knowledge of dhamma and need not ask questions.
Type two are those who lack of wisdom and will not know how to ask questions.

Those in the middle who are still learning and would to like to gain more knowledge of dhamma will ask questions.

@WorldTraveller you still have not answer these questions:
Do you know what is the true nature of things (yathābhūta)?

Can a "not-self" or "nonself" be the true nature of things?

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by rightviewftw » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:14 am

There are two type of people who can be questioned as well;

Type one are those who has wisdom
Type two are those who lack of wisdom

I just asked because i wondered why Lal would think that people are reading that stuff and understanding it. As WorldTraveller pointed out people might just not care to read it, not care to comment or are ignoring this thread.

If we actually look at this thread, there is no indication of these ideas gaining much traction here (as far as i can tell anyway).
How to meditate: Anapanasati, Satipatthana.
Intro to General Semantics
Factors & Perceptions

Parallel Dhammapada Reading
Chinese to Eng Dhp
"The statements; 'With the remainderless stopping & fading of the six contact-media is it the case that there is anything else?' '.. is it the case that there is not anything else .. is it the case that there both is & is not anything else .. is it the case that there neither is nor is not anything else?' objectify non-objectification. However far the six contact-media go, that is how far objectification goes."

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Pseudobabble » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:33 am

Holy crap this thread is 42 pages long.
"Does Master Gotama have any position at all?"

"A 'position,' Vaccha, is something that a Tathagata has done away with. What a Tathagata sees is this: 'Such is form, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is feeling, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is perception...such are fabrications...such is consciousness, such its origination, such its disappearance.'" - Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta


'Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return.' - Genesis 3:19

'Some fart freely, some try to hide and silence it. Which one is correct?' - Saegnapha

WorldTraveller
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by WorldTraveller » Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:05 am

rajitha7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:17 pm
Also read this NOW -> http://qr.ae/TUGDBI
#CRAP #BORING #YAWN
“Do not go by oral tradition, by lineage of teaching, by hearsay, by a canonical tradition, by logical reasoning, by inferential reasoning, by reasoned cogitation, by the acceptance of a view after pondering it, by the seeming competence of a speaker, or because you think: ‘The ascetic is our guru.’”
- Kālāma-sutta

WorldTraveller
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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by WorldTraveller » Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:30 am

kstan1122 wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:59 am
Do you know what is the true nature of things (yathābhūta)?

Can a "not-self" or "nonself" be the true nature of things?
Here you go. SN 12.15 has the answer to your both questions.

Ad hominem comment removed by moderator.
“Do not go by oral tradition, by lineage of teaching, by hearsay, by a canonical tradition, by logical reasoning, by inferential reasoning, by reasoned cogitation, by the acceptance of a view after pondering it, by the seeming competence of a speaker, or because you think: ‘The ascetic is our guru.’”
- Kālāma-sutta

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Re: The teachings of Ven. Waharaka Abhayaratanalankara Thero

Post by Lal » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:29 am

Before one can understand deeper concepts like anicca, dukkha, anatta and start on the Noble Eightfold Path, one MUST follow the mundane eightfold path and get rid of the 10 types of micca ditthi.

Lot of people can save a lot of time by understanding this key issue. The Buddha described this clearly in the Maha Cattarisaka Sutta (MN 117). It is not a deep sutta, so one should be able to read any English translation and get the basic idea. However, most translations I have seen are not that clear, again because instead of focusing on the ideas embedded, they are word-by-word translations.

Trying to analyze deep suttas without getting rid of the 10 types of micca ditthi is like trying to learn calculus without knowing how to add/subtract.

Mahā Cattārisaka Sutta (Discourse on the Great Forty)

This sutta discusses two eightfold paths: A mundane path that leads to rebirth in the “good realms” (at or above the human realm) and the Noble Eightfold Path that leads to Nibbāna.

1. All suttas in one way or another describe the Path to Nibbāna; there are many ways to analyze the Path.

- In this sutta, the emphasis is on the 20 “good factors”, 10 leading to “good rebirths’ and 10 leading to Nibbāna (Cooling Down of the mind). The opposing 20 factors direct one away from Nibbāna (to be trapped in the four lowest realms or apāyas).

2. The Path to Nibbāna is normally abbreviated as sila (virtue), samādhi (moral concentration), and paññā (wisdom).

- Without some level of wisdom one will not even start thinking about the Path. There are some people, no matter how much they listen or read about the Buddha’s message, cannot see any benefit from it. Such people have no sansāric habit (“gati“) built up from past lives, and their minds are totally covered; this is the strong form of avijjā called mōha.
- Therefore, without some level of wisdom (or paññā, not “book knowledge”) it is not possible to “see the Path”. When we talk about “seeing the Path”, it is not meant seeing with the eyes; it is seeing with wisdom.
- Thus the correct order is sila, samādhi, paññā (in the mundane Eightfold Path), and then start with higher paññā (with comprehension of anicca, dukkha, anatta) again in the Noble or Lokottara Eightfold Path, i.e., paññā, sila, samādhi towards Sammā Samādhi, that leads to Sammā Ñāna and Sammā Vimutti (Arahantship). These are the 10 factors for Nibbana.
- This is discussed in “Sīla, Samādhi, Pannā to Pannā, Sīla, Samādhi“.
- This is a cyclic process: when one completes the first round, one starts the next round with enhanced paññā, and can “see more”. The “seeing” will be complete only at the Arahant stage.

3. There are four kinds of “seeing” that is with a person that is improved in the following order: strong miccā ditthi and engaging in pāpa kamma (people like serial killers), moral people with some types of miccā ditthi (most people today belong to this category), after getting rid of 10 types of miccā ditthi, and transcendental Sammā Ditthi (comprehending anicca, dukkha, anatta or vision for attaining Nibbāna).

When one’s mind is totally covered with defilements (when one has mōha), one is likely to believe in all or some of the 10 types of miccā ditthi:

no benefits in giving
no benefits in fulfilling one’s responsibilities
no benefits in making offerings to devas and other beings
kamma or deeds do not have good and bad vipāka
this world does not exist
paralowa or the world of gandhabba does not exist
father is not a special person
mother is not a special person.
there are no instantaneous (opapathika) births in other realms.
there are no samana brahmana (basically Ariyas or yogis) who have cultivated their minds to be free of defilements and thus can can see other realms and previous births
See, “Micca Ditthi, Gandhabba, and Sotapanna Stage“, and “Hidden World of the Gandhabba: Netherworld (Para Lōka)” for a discussion on paralowa.

4. The 10 wrong actions that contribute to one’s downfall (akusala kamma) RESULT FROM the above 10 types of wrong views.

- One is not likely to see the consequences of immoral thoughts and intentions (miccā sankappa) in 3 categories: sensual lust (kāmaccanda), ill-will (vyāpāda), violence (himsā).
- Thus one will utter 4 types of miccā vācā or wrong speech: lying (musāvāda), slandering (pisunāvācā), harsh speech (parusāvācā), and empty speech (sampappalāpa).
- And one will engage in 3 types of immoral bodily actions (miccā kammanta): in killing living beings (pānātipātā) , taking the not-given (adinnādānā) , sexual misconduct and other extreme sensual activities (kāmēsu miccācārā).

5. The more one does those 10 defiled actions by the mind, speech, and body, the stronger one’s conviction of the 10 types of miccā ditthi will become. Thus one will be trapped in a downward Path.

- Thus one will be engaged in immoral livelihoods (miccā ājiva), make effort in such activities (miccā vāyāma), build-up that mindset (miccā sati), and solidify that kind of mindset (miccā samādhi).
- Those in turn will strengthen miccā ditthi, miccā sankappa, miccā vācā, miccā kammanta.
And so it goes on and on, pushing one in downward spiral.

6. Therefore, those two sets of 10 factors each will lead one in the wrong way towards unimaginable suffering in future lives, and it will be very difficult to break away from them.

- Sometimes acts of occasional kindness or charity could open one’s mind to the truth. This is probably the reason for the order: sila, samādhi, paññā. Even occasional acts of virtue (sila) can get one pointed in the right direction.

7. As one removes more and more types of miccā ditthi, one will start gaining Sammā Ditthi, which means not having those 10 types of miccā ditthi.

- Once the 10 types of miccā ditthi are removed, one starts comprehending anicca, dukkha, anatta, the correct interpretations. Of course, it will not help at all if anicca is interpreted as just “impermanence” and anatta as “no-self”.
- It is just like taking a medicine to cure a disease. If one is taking the wrong medicine, then no matter how long one takes it, that will not help.

8. So, the sutta explains that there are 2 types of Sammā Ditthi: mundane (lōkiya), and transcendental (lōkōttara).

- Initially, one sees the perils of miccā ditthi (and associated immoral acts), and starts turning to mundane Sammā Ditthi: One sees that things happen for a reason, and one could get into bad situations and bad births by doing immoral acts. One is motivated to do moral deeds and to seek good rebirths. Now one does not have mōha, but just avijjā.

- Then one starts thinking moral thoughts (Sammā Sankappa), uttering moral speech (Sammā Vācā), abstain from immoral deeds (Sammā Kammanta).
- Thus one will be engaged in moral livelihoods (Sammā ājiva), make effort in such activities (Sammā Vāyāma), build-up that mindset (Sammā Sati), and solidify that kind of mindset (Sammā Samādhi).
- This eight factors constitute the mundane Eightfold Path. One will be making progress towards “good rebirths”.

9. It is important to realize that those dasa akusala that are done by the body (killing, stealing, sexual misconduct) and speech (lying, slandering, harsh speech, gossiping) are tackled in the mundane Eightfold Path.

- This is specifically stated in the “Mahā ­Cat­tārīsa­ka Sutta (MN 117)“: https://legacy.suttacentral.net/pi/mn117
- Even though the English translation there could be better, this fact is clear in the English translation at that website: “https://legacy.suttacentral.net/en/mn117“.

10. Then some of those on the mundane Eightfold Path will start seeing the unique message of the Buddha, which says that one can NEVER find permanent happiness in this world (lōkiya).

- This is because, even if one makes sure to avoid the four lower realms (apāyas) in the next birth by following the mundane Noble Eightfold Path, one will not be assured of anything in the births after that. Because we have no idea under what circumstances we will be born in the next life even if it is human.
- Of course, one needs to be exposed the correct version of Tilakkhana.

11. As long as one has not not attained the Sōtapanna stage of Nibbāna, it is inevitable that one is likely to be born in the apāyas in (probably distant) future. One may be born in the human or higher realms for a long time to come due to the moral acts done in this life, but once that “good energy” is spent, past bad kamma vipāka will inevitably come to the surface.

- Thus, as long as we are born anywhere in these 31 realms, it will eventually lead to dukkha (suffering).
- Thus it is unfruitful to strive for such mundane happiness as a human, dēva, or brahma. In the long run, none of those births will provide permanent happiness. We cannot maintain anything to our satisfaction in the long run anywhere. This is the concept of anicca.
This is in fact the concept of anatta: that there is no place in the whole wider world of 31 realms that one could find refuge.

12. The realization of these three characteristics (anicca, dukkha, anatta) of this world (lokaya) is the point at which one grasps the lōkōttara Sammā Ditthi.

- Then one starts thinking moral thoughts (Sammā sankappa) on how to remove suffering FOREVER. Now one is not interested in merely seeking “good rebirths” because one realizes the futility of such efforts in the long term. This is lōkōttara Sammā Sankappa.
- One stops uttering immoral speech (Sammā vācā) and abstain from immoral deeds (Sammā kammanta), because one realizes that there is NO POINT in doing those things, not just because they lead to bad births. They are now lōkōttara Sammā Vācā and lōkōttara Sammā Kammanta.
- These in turn will lead to lōkōttara types of Sammā Ājiva, Sammā Vāyāma, Sammā Sati, and Sammā Samādhi.
- These eight factors constitute the lōkōttara Noble Eightfold Path that will take one progressively to stages of “higher cooling down” or Nibbāna starting with the Sōtapanna stage and ending in the Arahant stage.
- Avijjā is gradually dispelled starting at the Sōtapanna stage and completely removed at the Arahant stage; simultaneously, wisdom (paññā) grows and becomes complete at the Arahant stage.

13. The uniqueness of Buddha Dhamma lies in the lōkōttara Noble Eightfold Path. Other religions are focused on “how to live a moral life” (even if that has implications of permanent happiness in heaven), and that and more is embodied in the mundane Noble Eightfold Path.

- Buddha Dhamma says living a moral life is not enough to attain permanent happiness (because even heaven is not permanent according to Buddha Dhamma). Ultimately, it requires relinquishing all desires for worldly things.
- But the mindset to seek Nibbāna via “relinquishing all desires for worldly things” is not even possible until one makes progress on the mundane Noble Eightfold Path. The mind needs to be purified to some extent even to realize the futility of existence anywhere in the 31 realms.
- Through most of the recent past, the genuine lōkōttara Noble Eightfold Path had been hidden together with the true nature of the world as described by the real meanings of anicca, dukkha, anatta; most have been practicing the mundane Noble Eightfold Path. It is easy for most people to connect with the mundane Noble Eightfold Path simply because it is mundane, i.e., concepts that we are already comfortable with.
- But as the Buddha said, his Dhamma “had never been heard before…”, as he emphasized in the Dhamma Cakka Pavattana sutta: “pubbe ananussutesu dhammesu…“.

14. In summary, the forty factors are there because there are four pathways each with 10 outcomes: two types of wrong paths (one with 10 types of miccā ditthi and another with strong micca ditthi with immoral behavior) and two types of “good paths” (one after getting rid of 10 types of miccā ditthi and the next with starting to comprehend anicca, dukkha, anatta).

- The 10 outcomes in the Noble Path are: Sammā Ditthi, Sammā Sankappa, Sammā Vācā, Sammā Kammanta, Sammā Ājiva, Sammā Vāyāma, Sammā Sati, Sammā Samādhi, Sammā Ñāna, and Sammā Vimutti (Arahantship).
- Towards the end of the Buddha says, “Iti kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhaṅ­ga­saman­nā­gato sekkho, dasaṅ­ga­saman­nā­gato arahā hoti. “. Translated: “Thus, bhikkhus, the path of the disciple in higher training ( Sōtapanna, Sakadāgāmi, Anāgāmi) possesses eight factors, and the Arahant possesses ten factors“.
- The other three paths have corresponding 10 outcomes, leading to good or bad outcomes, but provide no permanent solution (of course the bad ones lead to unimaginable suffering).

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