Vipassana meditations

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
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dudette
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2018 9:13 am

Vipassana meditations

Post by dudette »

I think this question is asked a lot here, but I will ask it anyway because I am getting a little bit confused.
So I did the goenka's vipassana meditation (I do realize that some people dislike him here, it is understandable because of the technique and downgraded version of buddhism)
But lately, I have noticed that each monastery has its own vipassana meditation (correct me if I am wrong)
Additionally, in pali canon, buddha says that vipassana + samadhi, but he does not give instructions how to practice vipassana because of that some Buddhists (mostly mahayanas) only practice anapana for samadhi and vipassna (Mahayana Buddhists in my region tell me that anapana developes concentration and awareness/insight).

So my question is this, do some Theravada Buddhists (laypeople, monks and masters) just practice anapana to develop both samadhi and vipassna?

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DooDoot
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Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:06 pm

Re: Vipassana meditations

Post by DooDoot »

dudette wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:59 am
So my question is this, do some Theravada Buddhists (laypeople, monks and masters) just practice anapana to develop both samadhi and vipassna?
Yes.
When the noble eightfold path is developed, the following are fully developed: the four kinds of mindfulness meditation... And these two qualities proceed in conjunction: tranquility and insight (samatho ca vipassanā ca).

MN 149
The Anapanasati Sutta refers to both samatha & vipassanā, as follows:
FIRST TETRAD

(1) While breathing in long he fully comprehends: I breathe in long. While breathing out long he fully comprehends: I breathe out long.

(2) While breathing in short he fully comprehends: I breathe in short. While breathing out short he fully comprehends: I breathe out short.

(3) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing all bodies I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing all bodies I shall breathe out.

(4) He trains himself: calming the body-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: calming the body-conditioner I shall breathe out.18

SECOND TETRAD

(5) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing piti I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing piti I shall breathe out.

(6) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing sukha I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing sukha I shall breathe out.

(7) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind-conditioner I shall breathe out.

(8) He trains himself: calming the mind-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: calming the mind-conditioner I shall breathe out.

THIRD TETRAD

(9) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind I shall breathe out.

(10) He trains himself: gladdening the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: gladdening the mind I shall breathe out.

(11) He trains himself: concentrating the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: concentrating the mind I shall breathe out

(12) He trains himself: liberating the mind I shall breathe in.

FOURTH TETRAD

(13) He trains himself; constantly contemplating impermanence I shall breathe in. He trains himself; constantly contemplating impermanence I shall breathe out.

(14) He trains himself; constantly contemplating fading away I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating fading away I shall breathe out.

(15) He trains himself: constantly contemplating quenching I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating quenching I shall breathe out.

(16) He trains himself: constantly contemplating tossing back I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating tossing back I shall breathe out.

https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhik ... athing.htm
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati

dudette
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2018 9:13 am

Re: Vipassana meditations

Post by dudette »

DooDoot wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:11 pm
dudette wrote: ↑Sun Mar 08, 2020 1:59 pm
So my question is this, do some Theravada Buddhists (laypeople, monks and masters) just practice anapana to develop both samadhi and vipassna?
Yes.
But if this is the case then why from 20th century forward there such hype to separate samatha and vipassana into two different meditations in Theravada buddhism?

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Ceisiwr
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Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am

Re: Vipassana meditations

Post by Ceisiwr »

dudette wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:59 am
I think this question is asked a lot here, but I will ask it anyway because I am getting a little bit confused.
So I did the goenka's vipassana meditation (I do realize that some people dislike him here, it is understandable because of the technique and downgraded version of buddhism)
But lately, I have noticed that each monastery has its own vipassana meditation (correct me if I am wrong)
Additionally, in pali canon, buddha says that vipassana + samadhi, but he does not give instructions how to practice vipassana because of that some Buddhists (mostly mahayanas) only practice anapana for samadhi and vipassna (Mahayana Buddhists in my region tell me that anapana developes concentration and awareness/insight).

So my question is this, do some Theravada Buddhists (laypeople, monks and masters) just practice anapana to develop both samadhi and vipassna?

Greetings,

It’s my main meditation practice and I’ve always thought of it as combining the two. As you calm the body and mind through each stage you also gain insight into conditionality and anicca.

Metta

:)
“For that is false, bhikkhu, which has a deceptive nature, and that is true which has an undeceptive nature—Nibbāna. Therefore a bhikkhu possessing this truth possesses the supreme foundation of truth. For this, bhikkhu, is the supreme noble truth, namely, Nibbāna, which has an undeceptive nature.” MN 140

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DooDoot
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Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:06 pm

Re: Vipassana meditations

Post by DooDoot »

dudette wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:18 pm
But if this is the case then why from 20th century forward there such hype to separate samatha and vipassana into two different meditations in Theravada buddhism?
Theravada Buddhism must be replete with ignorance.
Ceisiwr wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:21 pm
It’s my main meditation practice and I’ve always thought of it as combining the two.
The suttas say the two occur in tandem.
Ceisiwr wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:21 pm
As you calm the body and mind through each stage
Which stages?
Ceisiwr wrote:
Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:21 pm
you also gain insight into conditionality and anicca.
Anicca-ness (aniccata) is not separated from unsatisfactoriness; unpleasantness (dukkhata) & not-self-ness (anattata). But according to your numerous posts on this forum, there is no such thing as "ness".
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati

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