Quote from Mahasi Sayadaw

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
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mikenz66
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Re: Quote from Mahasi Sayadaw

Post by mikenz66 »

Stephen18 wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:20 am
I just don't think this is a good translation or what actually happened.
You mean this?
everything seemed to be dissolving and breaking up.
This is one of the classical insight knowledges:
http://www.aimwell.org/progress.html#5. ... issolution
Visuddhimagga XXI.11 wrote:When insight knowledge has arisen in him in this way so that he sees how
the field of formations, having arisen thus, ceases thus, it is called contemplation
of dissolution at that stage, with reference to which it is said:
“Understanding of contemplation of dissolution, after reflecting on an object—
how is this knowledge of insight?
“Consciousness with materiality as its object arises and dissolves. Having
reflected on that object, he contemplates the dissolution of that consciousness.
...
:heart:
Mike

auto
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Re: Quote from Mahasi Sayadaw

Post by auto »

https://suttacentral.net/sn47.10/en/sujato wrote:“That’s so true, Ānanda! That’s so true!“Evametaṃ, ānanda, evametaṃ, ānanda.
Any monk or nun who meditates with their mind firmly established in the four kinds of mindfulness meditation can expect to
Yo hi koci, ānanda, bhikkhu vā bhikkhunī vā catūsu satipaṭṭhānesu suppatiṭṭhitacitto viharati, tassetaṃ pāṭikaṅkhaṃ:
realize a higher distinction than they had before.‘uḷāraṃ pubbenāparaṃ visesaṃ sañjānissati’.

What four?Katamesu catūsu?
It’s when a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world.
Idhānanda, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ.
As they meditate observing an aspect of the body, based on the body there arises physical tension, or mental sluggishness, or the mind is externally scattered.
Tassa kāye kāyānupassino viharato kāyārammaṇo vā uppajjati kāyasmiṃ pariḷāho, cetaso vā līnattaṃ, bahiddhā vā cittaṃ vikkhipati.
That mendicant should direct their mind towards an inspiring foundation.Tenānanda, bhikkhunā kismiñcideva pasādanīye nimitte cittaṃ paṇidahitabbaṃ.
As they do so, joy springs up.Tassa kismiñcideva pasādanīye nimitte cittaṃ paṇidahato pāmojjaṃ jāyati.
Being joyful, rapture springs up.Pamuditassa pīti jāyati.
When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil.Pītimanassa kāyo passambhati.
When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss.Passaddhakāyo sukhaṃ vedayati.
And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi.Sukhino cittaṃ samādhiyati.
Then they reflect:So iti paṭisañcikkhati:
‘I have accomplished the goal for which I directed my mind.‘yassa khvāhaṃ atthāya cittaṃ paṇidahiṃ, so me attho abhinipphanno.
Let me now pull back.’Handa dāni paṭisaṃharāmī’ti.
They pull back, and neither place the mind nor keep it connected.So paṭisaṃharati ceva na ca vitakketi na ca vicāreti.
They understand: ‘I’m neither placing the mind nor keeping it connected. Mindful within myself, I’m happy.’‘Avitakkomhi avicāro, ajjhattaṃ satimā sukhamasmī’ti pajānāti.
same for aspect of feeling, mind and principles.
Seems it is based on the thing you observe(aspect of body,.. feeling..dhamma) there arises issue what then is dealt with by directing the mind..
So,
not just noting, the skill to direct the mind must occur at some point.
--
and possibly modern Vipassana might take higher distinction as it were previously as a fruit of a path.. but maybe it is.. idk.

auto
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Re: Quote from Mahasi Sayadaw

Post by auto »

https://suttacentral.net/sn47.29/en/sujato wrote: “These four kinds of mindfulness meditation that were taught by the Buddha are found in me, and I am seen in them.“Yeme, bhante, bhagavatā cattāro satipaṭṭhānā desitā saṃvijjanti, te dhammā mayi, ahañca tesu dhammesu sandissāmi.
that above is interesting.
https://suttacentral.net/sn47.30/en/sujato wrote: Sir, I’m not keeping well, I’m not alright. The pain is terrible and growing, not fading; its growing is evident, not its fading.
na me, bhante, khamanīyaṃ na yāpanīyaṃ. Bāḷhā me dukkhā vedanā abhikkamanti, no paṭikkamanti; abhikkamosānaṃ paññāyati, no paṭikkamoti.

When I experience such painful feelings I meditate observing an aspect of the body—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world.Evarūpāya cāhaṃ, bhante, dukkhāya vedanāya phuṭṭho samāno kāye kāyānupassī viharāmi ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ;
experiencing pain, that is not issue what can be solved, rather it is based on that aspects of body(experiencing pain) there arises something what can be dealt with. (check sn47.10)
but here sn47.30 it says keen aware and mindful rid of desire etc..it is in case you have rid of the lower fetters.
https://suttacentral.net/sn47.30/en/sujato wrote:And of the five lower fetters taught by the Buddha, I don’t see any that I haven’t given up.”Yāni cimāni, bhante, bhagavatā pañcorambhāgiyāni saṃyojanāni desitāni, nāhaṃ, bhante, tesaṃ kiñci attani appahīnaṃ samanupassāmī”ti.

“You’re fortunate, householder, so very fortunate!“Lābhā te, gahapati, suladdhaṃ te, gahapati.You have declared the fruit of non-return.”Anāgāmiphalaṃ tayā, gahapati, byākatan”ti.

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