What does Mahasi Sayadaw mean by Initial Application of Mind?

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
auto
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Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:02 pm

Re: What does Mahasi Sayadaw mean by Initial Application of Mind?

Post by auto » Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:14 pm

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
The Blessed One said, "Monks, the ending of the fermentations is for one who knows & sees, I tell you, not for one who does not know & does not see. For one who knows what & sees what?
Appropriate attention & inappropriate attention.
When a monk attends inappropriately, unarisen fermentations arise, and arisen fermentations increase.
When a monk attends appropriately, unarisen fermentations do not arise, and arisen fermentations are abandoned.
There are fermentations to be abandoned by seeing, those to be abandoned by restraining, those to be abandoned by using, those to be abandoned by tolerating, those to be abandoned by avoiding, those to be abandoned by dispelling, and those to be abandoned by developing.

paul
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Location: Vietnam

Re: What does Mahasi Sayadaw mean by Initial Application of Mind?

Post by paul » Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:29 pm

Mahasi Sayadaw: "When the meditator gains insight-knowledge of the arising and passing away of all phenomena, he is fully aware of an arising object without initial or sustained application. He has intense joy, bliss, and tranquillity, thus his meditation is somewhat like the second absorption with its three attributes."

This refers to the joy that arises from insight, which is not often referred to explicitly. The practice where the temperament is inclined towards insight rather than samatha is largely nourished by that source of joy. According to the third noble truth removal of clinging results in a (proportionate) removal of suffering allowing a consequent influx of joy, sukha is the opposite of dukkha, and each time the thinking about the path is replaced by a paradigm that is closer to the truth then attachments are abandoned, but this also involves overcoming defilements of a greater intensity.
Despite Mahasi Sayadaw's enticing description, sukha at one end of its range can be simply non-suffering, the absence of stress, wellbeing.

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