Clear Comprehending

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
paul
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Re: Clear Comprehending

Post by paul » Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:53 am

Bikkhu Bodhi’s interpretation differs from Thanissaro’s (which I presented above), in that he attributes the memory function to sampajanna rather than sati:

“…the meditator clearly comprehends the nature and qualities of arisen phenomena, and relates them to the framework defined by the parameters of the dhamma, the teaching as an organic whole.”



“The two terms, sato and sampajanno often occur in proximity, implying a close affinity between their respective nouns, sati or mindfulness, and sampajanna or clear comprehension. To distinguish the two, I would describe mindfulness as lucid awareness of the phenomenal field. This element of lucid awareness prevails in the initial stages of practice. But with the strengthening of mindfulness, clear comprehension supervenes and adds the cognitive element. In the practice of insight meditation, the meditator clearly comprehends the nature and qualities of arisen phenomena and relates them to the framework defined by the parameters of the dhamma, the teaching as an organic whole.
The expression ‘clearly comprehending’ thus suggests that the meditator not only observes phenomena but interprets the presentational field in a way that sets arisen phenomena in a meaningful context. As the practice advances, clear comprehension takes on an increasingly important role, eventually evolving into direct insight (vipassana), and wisdom (panna).” —-“What Does Mindfulness Really Mean? A Canonical Perspective”, Bikkhu Bodhi.

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DooDoot
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Re: Clear Comprehending

Post by DooDoot » Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:42 am

pegembara wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:24 am
In the Sutta Pitaka, the Buddha gave two explanations of the term sampajañña. In the Samyutta-nikaya the Buddha defines sampajano as follows:

Kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajano hoti? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno vidita vedana uppajjanti, vidita upatthahanti, vidita abbhattham gacchanti; vidita sañña uppajjanti, vidita upahahanti, vidita abbhattham gacchanti; vidita vitakka uppajjanti, vidita upatthahanti, vidita abbhattham gacchanti. Evam kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajano hoti.2

And how, meditators, does a meditator understand thoroughly? Herein, meditators, a meditator knows sensations arising in him, knows their persisting, and knows their vanishing; he knows perceptions arising in him, knows their persisting, and knows their vanishing; he knows each initial application (of the mind on an object) arising in him, knows its persisting, and knows its vanishing. This, meditators, is how a meditator understands thoroughly.
The above is just a translation and, for me, it is wrong. It is wrong because it makes sampajanna sounds like vipassana. Imo, this cannot be true because the following sutta differentiates between sampajanna & vipassana.
[SAMPAJANNA] And what is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & sampajanna? There is the case where feelings are known to the monk as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Perceptions are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Thoughts are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. This is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness. (Thanissaro)

[VIPASSANA]“And what is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to the ending of the effluents? There is the case where a monk remains focused on arising & falling away with reference to the five clinging-aggregates: ‘Such is form, such its origination, such its passing away. Such is feeling, such its origination, such its passing away. Such is perception, such its origination, such its passing away. Such are fabrications, such their origination, such their passing away. Such is consciousness, such its origination, such its disappearance.’ This is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to the ending of the effluents.

https://suttacentral.net/an4.41/en/thanissaro
Note: the translation above by Thanissaro of "known" is questionable. Bodhi's translation of "understood" (below) is better.
And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu exercise clear comprehension? Here, bhikkhus, for a bhikkhu feelings are understood as they arise, understood as they remain present, understood as they pass away. Thoughts are understood as they arise, understood as they remain present, understood as they pass away. Perceptions are understood as they arise, understood as they remain present, understood as they pass away. It is in this way, bhikkhus, that a bhikkhu exercises clear comprehension. (Bodhi)

https://suttacentral.net/sn47.35/en/bodhi
Returning to the original quote, personally, I favour a translation similar to the following:
And how is a mendicant aware?

Kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti?

It’s when a mendicant acts with situational awareness when going out and coming back; when looking ahead and aside; when bending and extending the limbs; when bearing the outer robe, bowl and robes; when eating, drinking, chewing, and tasting; when urinating and defecating; when walking, standing, sitting, sleeping, waking, speaking, and keeping silent.

https://suttacentral.net/sn47.2/en/sujato

And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu exercise clear comprehension? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu is one who acts with clear comprehension when going forward and returning; when looking ahead and looking aside; when drawing in and extending the limbs; when wearing his robes and carrying his outer robe and bowl; when eating, drinking, chewing his food, and tasting; when defecating and urinating; when walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep, waking up, speaking, and keeping silent. It is in such a way that a bhikkhu exercises clear comprehension.

https://suttacentral.net/sn47.2/en/bodhi

pegembara
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Re: Clear Comprehending

Post by pegembara » Sat Sep 22, 2018 3:32 am



From 6:52 to 9:24
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.

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DooDoot
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Re: Clear Comprehending

Post by DooDoot » Sat Sep 22, 2018 3:45 am

pegembara wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 3:32 am
From 6:52 to 9:24
Thanks. The slide below appears similar to what I have been posting (although it is slightly confusing) but not what you previously posted. What you previously posted was translations that give the impression "sampajanna" is seeing the "present" characteristics of an object (which is "vipassana") rather than bringing "past knowledge" to an object (which is "sati-sampajanna"). While I only browsed the slide below, it appears useful for clarification (although both uses of the word "object" appears not clear). Sati (mindfulness) brings past or learned knowledge (sampajanna) to an object :smile:
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sati sampajanna.png

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Dharmasherab
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Re: Clear Comprehending

Post by Dharmasherab » Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:04 pm

Clearly Comprehending (Sampajanna) means to see things as they truly are and not how they appear to be. This is to see all things as impermanent. Usually, this word appears after Sati (Mindfulness).

If we just had Mindfulness without the Clear Comprehension then one could say that we can enjoy whatever that is pleasurable with mindfulness. But notice that there is no Sampajanna in this. If something pleasurable comes our way then we are Mindful of that but at the same time we also dont attach to by realising that this sensation which we are aware of is impermanent.

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