The Great Jhana Debate

The cultivation of calm or tranquility and the development of concentration
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samseva
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Re: Monks Average Meditation Routine

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:17 am

mikenz66 wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 8:57 pm
[...]
I don't think jhānas more in line with access concentration are considered jhāna. Visuddhimagga is less credible only due to being post-Canonical, but it is so strict that if one can reach Visuddhimagga jhānas, one has reached Sutta jhānas (so debating it is pointless).

I think it is dangerous of putting jhāna on a pedestal and to have beliefs similar to "jhāna can only be reached after meditating 8 hours per day for mulitple years" or "jhāna is unlikely outside of intensive retreats."

There's also an important distinction which seems to have been missed in the last 10 or so posts, being that simply reaching jhāna and mastery of a jhāna are two entirely different things.

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Re: Monks Average Meditation Routine

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:09 am

HI Samseva,
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:17 am
I don't think jhānas more in line with access concentration are considered jhāna.
No, of course, they should not be. I was merely wondering aloud whether that might, perhaps, have happened in some cases.
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:17 am
Visuddhimagga is less credible only due to being post-Canonical, but it is so strict that if one can reach Visuddhimagga jhānas, one has reached Sutta jhānas (so debating it is pointless).
You seem to have missed my observation that a number of EBT enthusiasts (Analayo, Sujato, Brahm, etc) have a definition of jhana, derived from the suttas, that is similar in depth to the VM definition (not being able to hear when in jhana, and so on).

Hence my observation that Sutta/VM is not a useful division. It seems to have been coined by Leigh Brasington, who writes:
http://www.leighb.com/jhanantp.htm
The first broad categorization would be into "Sutta Style Jhanas" and "Visuddhimagga Style Jhanas". These two phrases are not ideal, but I use them until someone comes up with a better pair. "Visuddhimagga Style Jhanas" use a nimitta for access and involve very deep concentration. "Sutta Style Jhanas" do not require a nimitta and involve more accessible states of concentration.
And further down:
Ajahn Brahmavamso is a Theravadan Buddhist monk who lives in Western Australia. He studied extensively with Ajahn Chah in Thailand as well as in other places before settling in Australia.
His definition of exactly what constituted a Jhana seems close to the depths indicated in the Visuddhimagga, but he says he teaches from the suttas and from his experience.
His essays The Basic Method of Meditation and Travelogue to the four Jhanas outline his Jhana teaching. The primary access method he teaches is Anapanasati, which he refers to as "experiencing the 'beautiful breath'." His main emphasis is about the attitude of not getting the 'doer' or 'craving' or 'will' involved. He emphasizes finding happiness and joy in stillness. His main teachings are now to 'make peace, be kind & be gentle' which are the right intentions of the Noble Eightfold Path. So no matter what method or object of meditation one uses, one has to make sure to have the 'right intentions' of it. His dharma talks here explain this in more detail.
As I said, you can add Venerables Sujato, Analayo, and other teachers to those who use the Suttas to argue that jhana is a deep absorption. Along with Zom, Sylvester, and others on this this Forum.

Personally, I have not pursued meditation designed to enter jhana, and I don't think I have experienced jhana. As I said, I mostly do Mahasi-style practice. However, I have spent enough time on retreats to know that all kinds of interesting experiences can arise with this (and presumably any other) approach. I'm inclined to be very careful about assigning too much importance to any of my experiences, since experiences is not the point - inclining the mind towards awakening is.

:heart:
Mike

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samseva
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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:17 am

mikenz66 wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:09 am
[...]
It is difficult to differentiate between the exact "definitions" of jhāna of various practitioners—and to a certain degree, also pointless. What I do know, and consider, is that actual Visuddhimagga jhānas are the jhānas described in the Visuddhimagga, which Buddhaghosa describes as being very difficult to attain (1 in one million practitioners). A good example of practitioners of this style of jhāna are monks at Pa Auk Monastery, where the Visudddhimagga is deliberately taken as their main meditation guide (even more so than the Suttas). These jhānas are not Canonical, but like I previously said, if one can reach Visuddhimagga jhānas, one can reach Sutta jhānas.

Sutta jhāna is what is described in the Suttas (obviously). This is still deep concentration where sounds and other external perceptions aren't present—but it isn't 1 in one million meditators who can reach jhāna, like described by Buddhaghosa regarding Visudhimagga jhānas. From this, I consider Sutta jhānas being like how you have been describing jhānas with Ven. Anālayo, Ajahn Brahm and Sujato, Zom, Sylvester and so on. I have no idea why Leigh Brasington classed the Sutta-style jhāna of Ajahn Brahm in Visuddhimagga-style jhānas—which is in itself contradictory.

However, in the current discussion, I think there are 2 issues:
  1. Not differentiating between reaching jhāna (if only once) and mastery of jhāna.
  2. Putting (Sutta-type) jhāna on a pedestal and having beliefs such as that "jhāna is only possible if you meditate for 8 per day for multiple years" or that "jhāna is unlikely outside an intensive retreat."

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Re: Monks Average Meditation Routine

Post by Mkoll » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:25 am

samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 12:46 am
Mkoll wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 8:00 am
As a Buddhist in a Buddhist context (this forum), I place jhana in the context of the teachings where they're defined as sammasamadhi. So when I use the word jhana, that's what I mean. I don't deny that others outside a Buddhasasana have attained states of concentration/peace/calm/samadhi, but I don't call them jhana or sammasamadhi.
Yes, jhāna in the Eightfold Path is a "Buddhist jhāna", but whether jhāna is reached by a Buddhist meditator, or a Hindu ascetic, it is still the same exact mecanism. The only thing that differentiates jhāna in a Buddhist context and jhāna in a non-Buddhist context is that jhāna in Buddhism is used as a tool to develop insight. Same exact mecanism of the mind; different purpose.
If you want to redefine jhana to fit your predilections, who am I to stop you? After all, many others do the same thing.

:shrug:
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 12:46 am
Mkoll wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 8:00 am
Then you should have made that clear, e.g. by quoting or using "@name" for each individual point and person you're responding to with your statements instead of writing a big paragraph full of responses to different people and expecting them to understand who you're talking to with each one.
I did. I started the exact paragraph by stating all three names. I wasn't going to pinpoint every single person for each point... if a particular point didn't apply to you, then it didn't apply.
If you want to continue engaging in unclear communication, who am I to stop you? After all, many others do the same thing.

:shrug:
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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samseva
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Re: Monks Average Meditation Routine

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:29 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:25 am
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 12:46 am
Yes, jhāna in the Eightfold Path is a "Buddhist jhāna", but whether jhāna is reached by a Buddhist meditator, or a Hindu ascetic, it is still the same exact mecanism. The only thing that differentiates jhāna in a Buddhist context and jhāna in a non-Buddhist context is that jhāna in Buddhism is used as a tool to develop insight. Same exact mecanism of the mind; different purpose.
If you want to redefine jhana to fit your predilections, who am I to stop you? After all, many others do the same thing.
If jhāna is not a mecanism of the mind, then what is it? Or would you instead say that there is a special type of jhāna in our minds that is "Buddhist"?

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Re: Monks Average Meditation Routine

Post by aflatun » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:43 am

mikenz66 wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:09 am

You seem to have missed my observation that a number of EBT enthusiasts (Analayo, Sujato, Brahm, etc) have a definition of jhana, derived from the suttas, that is similar in depth to the VM definition (not being able to hear when in jhana, and so on).
I'm not nit picking you Mike, just sharing my current thoughts on this. Perhaps the notion that depth = intensity of cognitive black out at the five "external" senses is itself a problematic measuring stick to use.

What I find hard to swallow (I'll be honest, unbelievable actually) is the notion that the pinnacle of the path is a trance that is attainable with sufficient proficiency at manipulation of one's mental continuum, e.g. a technique devoid of insight. In the suttas we see, I think, different things leading to jhana, including faith, reflection on the dhamma, brahmaviharas, and some insight-type contemplations, the latter seemingly taking one as far as the 7th.
Aneñja-sappaya Sutta wrote:"Then again, the disciple of the noble ones considers this: 'Sensuality here & now; sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual perceptions in lives to come; forms here & now; forms in lives to come; form-perceptions here & now; form-perceptions in lives to come; perceptions of the imperturbable: all are perceptions. Where they cease without remainder: that is peaceful, that is exquisite, i.e., the dimension of nothingness.' Practicing & frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension. There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension of nothingness now or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it's possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the dimension of nothingness. This is declared to be the first practice conducive to the dimension of nothingness.

"Then again, the disciple of the noble ones, having gone into the wilderness, to the root of a tree, or into an empty dwelling, considers this: 'This is empty of self or of anything pertaining to self.' Practicing & frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension. There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension of nothingness now or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it's possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the dimension of nothingness. This is declared to be the second practice conducive to the dimension of nothingness.

"Then again, the disciple of the noble ones considers this: 'I am not anyone's anything anywhere; nor is anything of mine in anyone anywhere.' Practicing & frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension. There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension of nothingness now or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it's possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the dimension of nothingness. This is declared to be the third practice conducive to the dimension of nothingness.
MN 106

Can insight, and understanding, lead to jhana, rather than only the other way around? My current understanding is, yes.


This is not likely to be persuasive to anyone on a theravada board, so I hesitate to even say it, but in Chan and Tibetan Buddhism absorptive trances, while having their uses, are considered inferior to other approaches which emphasize the conjunction of insight and samadhi in the context of all six senses being wide open. We get the impression that "meditation" is not about modulating experience but rather about penetrating experience. Of course this is sometimes couched in obnoxious supercessionist rhetoric (e.g. this approach is superior to the hinayana absorptions) but perhaps those "hinayana absorptions" where never even that to begin with...

Or we might consider this off the wall idea from Ven. N. Nanamoli
In other words, by understanding what jhāna is, one enters it, not by performing a set of prescribed motions that somehow make it “happen” to one.
I don't pretend to have any definite answers here, just thinking out loud. Thanks for listening!
Last edited by aflatun on Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:49 am, edited 2 times in total.
"People often get too quick to say 'there's no self. There's no self...no self...no self.' There is self, there is focal point, its not yours. That's what not self is."

Ninoslav Ñāṇamoli
Senses and the Thought-1, 42:53

"Those who create constructs about the Buddha,
Who is beyond construction and without exhaustion,
Are thereby damaged by their constructs;
They fail to see the Thus-Gone.

That which is the nature of the Thus-Gone
Is also the nature of this world.
There is no nature of the Thus-Gone.
There is no nature of the world."

Nagarjuna
MMK XXII.15-16

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by Mkoll » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:44 am

Just replace "mental process" in what I said earlier with "mechanism of the mind" and you have my answer:
Mkoll wrote:I read the texts as saying that right concentration (sammasamadhi), i.e. the 4 jhanas, is distinctly Buddhist because it is dependent upon the other limbs of the path—see MN 117. The means by which the mind does or experiences anything can be seen as a mental process, so saying jhana is a mental process is essentially a meaningless statement.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:02 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:44 am
[...]
Āḷāra Kālāma was one of the Buddha's teachers before he discovered the Four Noble Truths. The Buddha left because what he taught was only the base of nothingness, which is reached only past (or part of) the fourth jhāna.

How is it possible that a non-Buddhist—and even more so, when "Buddhism" didn't even exist—was able to reach all four jhānas?
MN 26 wrote:Bhikkhus, before my enlightenment, while I was still only an unenlightened Bodhisatta, I too, being myself subject to birth, sought what was also subject to birth; being myself subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement, I sought what was also subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement. Then I considered thus: ‘Why, being myself subject to birth, do I seek what is also subject to birth? Why, being myself subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement, do I seek what is also subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement? Suppose that, being myself subject to birth, having understood the danger in what is subject to birth, I seek the unborn supreme security from bondage, Nibbāna. Suppose that, being myself subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement, having understood the danger in what is subject to ageing, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilement, I seek the unageing, unailing, deathless, sorrowless, and undefiled supreme security from bondage, Nibbāna.’
[..]
“I considered: ‘It is not through mere faith alone that Āḷāra Kālāma declares: “By realising for myself with direct knowledge, I enter upon and abide in this Dhamma.” Certainly Āḷāra Kālāma abides knowing and seeing this Dhamma.’ Then I went to Āḷāra Kālāma and asked him: ‘Friend Kālāma, in what way do you declare that by realising for yourself with direct knowledge you enter upon and abide in this Dhamma?’ In reply he declared the base of nothingness.

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by Mkoll » Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:32 am

samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:02 am
the base of nothingness, which is reached only past (or part of) the fourth jhāna.
Just because the Buddhist texts teach the way to the formless attainments via the jhanas, doesn't mean that's the only way one can attain them. If someone gives you directions on how to get from New York to Chicago, that doesn't mean that's the only way to get from New York to Chicago.

And they never say that the formless attainments are "part of" the fourth jhana.
How is it possible that a non-Buddhist—and even more so, when "Buddhism" didn't even exist—was able to reach all four jhānas?
Where does it say a non-Buddhist reached all four jhanas?
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by Saengnapha » Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:51 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:44 am
Just replace "mental process" in what I said earlier with "mechanism of the mind" and you have my answer:
Mkoll wrote:I read the texts as saying that right concentration (sammasamadhi), i.e. the 4 jhanas, is distinctly Buddhist because it is dependent upon the other limbs of the path—see MN 117. The means by which the mind does or experiences anything can be seen as a mental process, so saying jhana is a mental process is essentially a meaningless statement.
How can jhana be anything other than a mental process? It is still in the subject object realm and is not the cause of cessation.

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:04 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:32 am
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:02 am
the base of nothingness, which is reached only past (or part of) the fourth jhāna.
Just because the Buddhist texts teach the way to the formless attainments via the jhanas, doesn't mean that's the only way one can attain them. If someone gives you directions on how to get from New York to Chicago, that doesn't mean that's the only way to get from New York to Chicago.

And they never say that the formless attainments are "part of" the fourth jhana.
How is it possible that a non-Buddhist—and even more so, when "Buddhism" didn't even exist—was able to reach all four jhānas?
Where does it say a non-Buddhist reached all four jhanas?
In the same Sutta, bottom of the page:
MN 26 wrote:“Again, with the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous disappearance of joy and grief, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the fourth jhāna, which has neither-pain-nor-pleasure and purity of mindfulness due to equanimity. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, with the complete surmounting of perceptions of form, with the disappearance of perceptions of sensory impact, with non-attention to perceptions of diversity, aware that ‘space is infinite,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of infinite space. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of infinite space, aware that ‘consciousness is infinite,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of infinite consciousness. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of infinite consciousness, aware that ‘there is nothing,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of nothingness. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of nothingness, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of neither-perception-nor-non-perception. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra, to have become invisible to the Evil One by depriving Māra’s eye of its opportunity.[/b]

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by Mkoll » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:16 am

Saengnapha wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:51 am
Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:44 am
Just replace "mental process" in what I said earlier with "mechanism of the mind" and you have my answer:
Mkoll wrote:I read the texts as saying that right concentration (sammasamadhi), i.e. the 4 jhanas, is distinctly Buddhist because it is dependent upon the other limbs of the path—see MN 117. The means by which the mind does or experiences anything can be seen as a mental process, so saying jhana is a mental process is essentially a meaningless statement.
How can jhana be anything other than a mental process? It is still in the subject object realm and is not the cause of cessation.
I'm not denying that jhana is a mental process. I'm saying it's brought about via a specific set of conditions, namely the Noble Eightfold Path. The Noble Eightfold Path is only taught by a Buddha. Therefore, it is distinctly Buddhist.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:18 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:16 am
I'm not denying that jhana is a mental process. I'm saying it's brought about via a specific set of conditions, namely the Noble Eightfold Path. The Noble Eightfold Path is only taught by a Buddha. Therefore, it is distinctly Buddhist.
I think you are confusing sammā-samādhi and jhānas. Yes, sammā-samādhi is Buddhist and is conjoined to the other factors of the path. Sammā-samādhi is also defined as the jhānas.

However, in no way does that mean that jhānas and samādhi are in and of themselves "Buddhist." They both are simply functions/mental processes of the mind. The Buddha didn't invent jhānas or samādhi. Jhānas were practiced by many Jains and ascetics even before the Buddha.

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by samseva » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:22 am

Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:16 am
I'm not denying that jhana is a mental process. I'm saying it's brought about via a specific set of conditions, namely the Noble Eightfold Path. The Noble Eightfold Path is only taught by a Buddha. Therefore, it is distinctly Buddhist.
The Eightfold Path is not a prerequisite for jhāna. You made that up.

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Re: The Great Jhana Debate

Post by Mkoll » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:23 am

samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:04 am
Mkoll wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:32 am
samseva wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:02 am
the base of nothingness, which is reached only past (or part of) the fourth jhāna.
Just because the Buddhist texts teach the way to the formless attainments via the jhanas, doesn't mean that's the only way one can attain them. If someone gives you directions on how to get from New York to Chicago, that doesn't mean that's the only way to get from New York to Chicago.

And they never say that the formless attainments are "part of" the fourth jhana.
How is it possible that a non-Buddhist—and even more so, when "Buddhism" didn't even exist—was able to reach all four jhānas?
Where does it say a non-Buddhist reached all four jhanas?
In the same Sutta, bottom of the page:
MN 26 wrote:“Again, with the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous disappearance of joy and grief, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the fourth jhāna, which has neither-pain-nor-pleasure and purity of mindfulness due to equanimity. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, with the complete surmounting of perceptions of form, with the disappearance of perceptions of sensory impact, with non-attention to perceptions of diversity, aware that ‘space is infinite,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of infinite space. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of infinite space, aware that ‘consciousness is infinite,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of infinite consciousness. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of infinite consciousness, aware that ‘there is nothing,’ a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of nothingness. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra…

“Again, by completely surmounting the base of nothingness, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the base of neither-perception-nor-non-perception. This bhikkhu is said to have blindfolded Māra, to have become invisible to the Evil One by depriving Māra’s eye of its opportunity.[/b]
He's teaching and talking to bhikkhus, i.e. disciples of the Buddha, i.e. Buddhists.

Again, where does it say a non-Buddhist reached all four jhanas?
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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