picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

The cultivation of calm or tranquility and the development of concentration
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frank k
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picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by frank k » Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:57 pm

In pictures: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ and ⛔ABRJ
https://notesonthedhamma.blogspot.com/2 ... s-vs.html

⛔VRJ, Vism. Redefinition
⛔ABRJ (Ajahn Brahm Re-definition of Jhāna)
⛔Pa Auk Sayadaw adheres closely to VRJ
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thang
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by thang » Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:38 am

frank k wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:57 pm
✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ and ⛔ABRJ
⛔VRJ, Vism. Redefinition
⛔ABRJ (Ajahn Brahm Re-definition of Jhāna)
⛔Pa Auk Sayadaw adheres closely to VRJ
Does Samma samadhi mean both Samatha+Vipassana or solely Samatha?

What is the correct way of practicing Vipassana, according to EBTs.?
pre-jhana, inside-jhana, post-jhana ?
And what is contemplated?
"Bhikkhus, whatever the Tathāgata speaks, _ all that is just so and NOT otherwise."

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DooDoot
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by DooDoot » Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:51 am

Pictures worth 1000 words :strawman: In pictures: ✅☸ sammā samādhi,
Attachments
sn 48 10.png
AB jhana.png
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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thang
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by thang » Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:55 am

DooDoot wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:51 am
Pictures worth 1000 words :strawman: In pictures: ✅☸ sammā samādhi,
Does that (AB explanation) mean, we have to cultivate 'letting go' while mind is in non-jhana states (pre/post jhana states and during daily chores)? Is it called Vipassana?
Does 'seeing things as Anicca' need/needless according to him?
According to AB, how kilesas fading process happen? Is it done just by going in and out jhana?
"Bhikkhus, whatever the Tathāgata speaks, _ all that is just so and NOT otherwise."

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DooDoot
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by DooDoot » Tue Mar 19, 2019 5:39 am

thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:55 am
Does that (AB explanation) mean, we have to cultivate 'letting go' while mind is in non-jhana states (pre/post jhana states and during daily chores)?
Yes, it seems this is what is to done, as is written in the sutta (SN 48.10) quoted.
thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:55 am
Is it called Vipassana?
My reply is "no" & "yes". "Letting go" is certainly a function of "wisdom" ("panna"). However, at the preliminary stages of practise, I would call it "sampajana", namely, "thorough understanding" of how to practise the Dhamma. But once it is clearly seen that "letting go" directly results in calming, cleansing & peace, imo, this clear seeing is included in "vipassana". It is "vipassana" of the noble truths/cause & effect (rather than vipassana of the three characteristics).
thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:55 am
Does 'seeing things as Anicca' need/needless according to him?
For this topic, it appears Ajahn Brahm has taught the same as the sutta quoted. "Letting go" is the primary dhamma to be practised for jhana, according to Ajahn Brahm & the sutta quoted.
thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:55 am
According to AB, how kilesas fading process happen? Is it done just by going in and out jhana?
I don't know. I have not read AB's book completely. AB's book is too long for me to read. I am a poor reader of excessive unnecessary writings. The Buddha spoke one sentence about how to reach jhana. AB writes hundreds of sentences. I am not sure why many monks write such long books. Personally, I do not believe there is a correlation between many words & many good karma points.

Regards :anjali:
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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frank k
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by frank k » Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:28 am

thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:38 am

Does Samma samadhi mean both Samatha+Vipassana or solely Samatha?

What is the correct way of practicing Vipassana, according to EBTs.?
pre-jhana, inside-jhana, post-jhana ?
And what is contemplated?
IMO, it's best to just stick with EBT, not Vism. which adds much more complexity that doesn't bring anything to the table, IMO.
first jhana... fourth jhana have specific conditions to describe them,
but when 'jhana or jhayati (verb form of jhana) is used in the suttas, it's much more general purpose referring to 'meditation', related to any of the meditative practices in 8aam (noble eightfold path) and 37bp (bodhi pakkhiya).

There really is no hard division between satipatthana and jhana. They both contain elements of samatha/vipassana.
http://lucid24.org/sted/8aam/8samadhi/4 ... ndex.html
Late Theravada and Vism. create that artificial dichotomy for their own Abhidhammic agenda.

Whatever aspect of reality one wants to see clearly can be contemplated. Typically 5 aggregates or 6 sense media.

It's best to not pay attention to anything DooDoot says.
If DooDoot wants to have a genuine Dhamma debate on any useful topic, he/she can respond directly to my blog post where no forum moderators can interfere.
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budo
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by budo » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:19 am

thang wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:38 am
frank k wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:57 pm
✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ and ⛔ABRJ
⛔VRJ, Vism. Redefinition
⛔ABRJ (Ajahn Brahm Re-definition of Jhāna)
⛔Pa Auk Sayadaw adheres closely to VRJ
Does Samma samadhi mean both Samatha+Vipassana or solely Samatha?

What is the correct way of practicing Vipassana, according to EBTs.?
pre-jhana, inside-jhana, post-jhana ?
And what is contemplated?
According to suttas one attains jhana and sees it as anicca, dukkha, anatta and lets go of it and develops the next jhana all the way to cessation. Going to cessation and seeing origination is vipassana and attaining the supermundane (arahant path)

Going to fourth jhana is Samma Samadhi

Developing the perception of light in fourth jhana is supernormal (abhinna)

Combining the supermundane with the supernormal one destroys the assavas and attains the fruit of arahantship.

supermundane = path (magga)
+
supernormal = fruit (phala)

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DooDoot
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by DooDoot » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:33 am

frank k wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:28 am
IMO, it's best to just stick with EBT.. It's best to not pay attention to anything DooDoot says.
But DooDoot quoted the EBTs. So the above sounds illogical. Ajahn Brahm appears to conform with the EBTs.
frank k wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:28 am
If DooDoot wants to have a genuine Dhamma debate on any useful topic, he/she can respond directly to my blog post where no forum moderators can interfere.
To me, the blog appears to be an attempt to argue a case for Ego McJhana or Ego Jhana-Super-Lite or Ego Papanca Jhana. I will post here, on DW, for the benefit of eyes with little dust. The following EBT quote appears to refute what appears to be your core idea of Papanca Vitakka: :idea:
MN 19 wrote:As I abided thus, diligent ardent and resolute, a thought of renunciation... non-ill will ... non-cruelty arose in me. I understood thus: ‘This thought of non-cruelty has arisen in me. This does not lead to my own affliction, or to others’ affliction, or to the affliction of both; it aids wisdom, does not cause difficulties and leads to Nibbāna. If I think and ponder upon this thought even for a night, even for a day, even for a night and day, I see nothing to fear from it. But with excessive thinking and pondering I might tire my body, and when the body is tired, the mind becomes strained, and when the mind is strained, it is far from concentration.’ So I steadied (saṇṭhapemi) my mind (cittaṃ) internally (ajjhattameva), quieted it (sannisādemi), brought it to singleness (ekodiṃ) and concentrated it (samādahāmi). Why is that? So that my mind should not be strained. ✅

Tireless energy was aroused in me and unremitting mindfulness was established, my body was tranquil and untroubled, my mind concentrated and unified (samāhitaṃ cittaṃ ekaggaṃ). ✅

Quite secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, I entered upon and abided in the first jhāna...

https://suttacentral.net/mn19/en/bodhi
https://suttacentral.net/mn19/en/sujato
https://suttacentral.net/mn19/pli/ms

There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati

ToVincent
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by ToVincent » Tue Mar 19, 2019 9:08 pm

There are two possible roots in Sanskrit for Jhāyati, the verb in Pali from which the agent Jhāna comes from.
One is kṣāyati (kṣāy, kṣī); and the other is dhyāyati (dhī-āyati).

As often in the suttas, both are interrelated.

One has to understand the concept of ṭhitā; as in understanding the "knowledge of the stability (unmoving/ṭhitā) of the dhamma.
For that matter, one has to understand a bit of Indian Vedic philosophy.
In the Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad, we have an explanation of ṭhitā.
dve vāva brahmaṇo rūpe
mūrtaṃ caivāmūrtaṃ ca
martyaṃ cāmṛtaṃ ca
sthitaṃ ca yac ca
sac ca tyaṃ ca
Verily, there are two forms of Brahman,
the formed and the formless,
the mortal and the immortal,
the unmoving (sthitaṃ) and the moving,
the actual (existent) and the true (being).
BṛĀrUp. 2.3.1

Here one has to understand the "unmoving", the "stability" as something fixed, that does not expand.
What Vedism and Buddhism adress here, is the narrowness of mind (citta) when it is polluted by the senses. It does not expand. The experiences are "unmoving". One is just trapped in the stability of the dhamma (dharmán - the actualisation of thinking), that is paṭiccasamuppāda.

Jhānas are the way to reach the formless, the immortal, the moving and the true being.

One has to expand (आयति āyati - stretching, extending RV.) his thought (धी dhī - thought, notion) with the help of "making an end" (kṣāyati, from √ क्षि kṣi RV. AV. MBh.) of several impediments. Such as, for instance:
- being secluded from sensual pleasure and unproper states (first jhāna).
- near total cessation of vitakka/vicara (second jhāna)
- abscence of raga towards piti (third jhāna).
- vanishing of somanassa and domanassa & giving up dukha and sukha (fouth jhāna).
- and all the complete different transcending (samatikkama) in each of the higher jhana.

The expansion starts with the establishment (samādhi) of citta. Namely reaching an unpolluted citta. Unpolluted from the senses.
Liberated (cetovimutti).
.
.
Some working for the Mara's world; some for the Brahma's world; some for the Unborn.
.
In this world with its ..., māras, ... - In this population with its ascetics.... (AN 5.30).
------

https://justpaste.it/j5o4

ToVincent
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by ToVincent » Wed Mar 20, 2019 8:44 pm

Just wanted to add this (I can't edit my previous post anymore).

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Vedic reference
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Dhyāna in the Chāndogyopaniṣad (Chandogya Upanishad - ChUp.).
____________

Speech, undoubtedly, is greater than name (mental)
vāg vāva nāmno bhūyasī
7.2.1

The mano, undoubtedly, is greater than speech
mano vāva vāco bhūyo
7.3.1

Will (samkalpa), undoubtedly, is greater than the mano
saṃkalpo vāva manaso bhūyān
7.4.1

Citta, undoubtedly, is greater than will (volition/intention).
Verily when one thinks with the citta, then he wills, then he reflects with mano, then he pronounces a word.
cittaṃ vāva saṃkalpād bhūyo | yadā vai cetayate'tha saṃkalpayate | atha manasyati | atha vācam īrayati.
7.5.1


"Expanding thought (dhyāna) undoubtedly, is greater than Citta,
in the same manner as the wide world has the disposition to expand;
in the same manner as the intermediate region has the disposition to expand;
in the same manner as the sky has the disposition to expand;
in the same manner as the waters have the disposition to expand;
in the same manner as the mountains have the disposition to expand;
and in the same manner as the gods and men have the disposition to expand (their citta);
Therefore, those who achieve eminence among men in this world have, in some sense, received their share of the fruits of expanding thought. Small minded men are cantankerous, backbiting, and offensive, whereas those who are noble minded have, in some sense, received their share of the fruits of expanding thought. So, venerate expanding thought.
dhyānaṃ vāva cittād bhūyo |
dhyāyatīva pṛthivī | (dhī āyatī iva pṛthivī, etc.)
dhyāyatīva antarikṣaṃ |
dhyāyatīva dyauh |
dhyāyantīva apo |
dhyāyantīva parvatā
deva-manuṣyās tasmād ya iha manuṣyāṇāṃ
mahattāṃ prāpnuvanti dhyānāpādāmśā ivaiva te bhavanty |
atha ye'lpāḥ kalahinaḥ piśunā upavādinaste'tha ye prabhavo dhyānāpādāmśā ivaiva te bhavanti | dhyānamupāssveti
7.6.1

धी dhī
- thought , (esp.) religious thought , reflection , meditation , devotion , prayer (pl. Holy Thoughts personified) RV.
- notion , opinion RV.
BUT ALSO
- disposition, design.

आयति āyati
- stretching , extending (expanding) RV.

इव iva
- like , in the same manner as.

Consciousness, undoubtedly, is greater than expansive thinking
vijñānaṃ vāva dhyānād bhūyaḥ
7.7.1


________

Note also that आयति āyati is the action of आयम् āyam [ā-yam] which means literally (to) "self-restrain".
√ यम् yam
- to establish RV.
- to expand RV.
but also:
- to hold back, restrain, subdue, control RV.

Restraint from the mano. Establishment and expansion of citta, I suppose.

________

The question is: Can dhyāna be defined as encompassing all the jhanas? Or only the part that concerns the expansion of thinking?
.
.
Some working for the Mara's world; some for the Brahma's world; some for the Unborn.
.
In this world with its ..., māras, ... - In this population with its ascetics.... (AN 5.30).
------

https://justpaste.it/j5o4

constellation
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by constellation » Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:59 pm

The mind is formless, colourless, intangible and is of the nature of clarity and cognition. Although this may seem repetitive, it is a very important point. For example, a piece of clear glass. When a red or yellow light is seen through this glass it changes colour. When there is no light shining through it remains clear. Similarly, when the mind comes into contact with various objects it is transmuted by those objects. And similarly, when it is free of objective contact, it remains clear.

For example, if we observe our mind and imagine some sort of positive or beneficial experience happening to us we notice that a pleasant feeling of happiness arises. If we think of getting a pay increase, passing our exams or any other similarly satisfying event, immediately this joyful feeling arises within us. When it does so, that joy within our mind is completely void of form, colour or any other tangible attribute. It is one of the mental factors which co-exist with one's mind, which, in this case, permeates the mind with the sensation of happiness.

If we observe this process we can see how the mind contains a feeling and yet the mind itself remains clear and cognitive, void of form, colour or tangibility. Reflecting on these different sensations and the way in which they arise in the mind, will help us to discern the nature of consciousness more clearly. Just as the glass appears to be red or yellow according to the light shining behind it, so too our mind appears to be disturbed or satisfied according to the mental factors that arise in it. The glass itself remains clear and the basic nature of the mind is also clear and lucid.

In order to discern its clear and cognitive nature we must observe the mind with a small part of the mental consciousness. This is not easy at first because the object to be discerned and that which discerns it are both part of our mind. Both are of the nature of mind and intangible, formless and colourless. Because both are non-material it is therefore hard, in the beginning, to recognize them clearly. When we concentrate on the mind we may feel that there is no object that we can apprehend. There is, in fact, an object but as it is very subtle, formless, colourless and intangible, it is accordingly more difficult to apprehend immediately. When, for instance, we concentrate mentally on empty space nothing really comes to mind because there is no solid-seeming object with any colour, shape or other quality that we can easily recognize. There is merely the absence of any obstructing contact. Concentrating on the nature of the mind is somewhat similar in that it lacks an easily apprehendable object.

To be able to fix the mind on the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically. Studying the concentration object (kammaṭṭhāna).

skill in some task that one is doing _part 1_.pdf


skill in some task that one is doing _part 2_.pdf

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bridif1
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by bridif1 » Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:36 pm

constellation wrote:
Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:59 pm
The mind is formless, colourless, intangible and is of the nature of clarity and cognition. Although this may seem repetitive, it is a very important point. For example, a piece of clear glass. When a red or yellow light is seen through this glass it changes colour. When there is no light shining through it remains clear. Similarly, when the mind comes into contact with various objects it is transmuted by those objects. And similarly, when it is free of objective contact, it remains clear.
Hi constellation!

So, according to you, the mind is something different from the mind processes and mind objects?
There is an everpresent untainted mind that gets tainted through ignorance and contact?
Has that division between the mind and mind processes an empirical basis?
Could we just said that "the mind" is just a label to group the 4 khandhas that are not 'rupa', and that those processes-khandhas do not have essential properties?
Could we just say that "the mind is tainted" is just a metaphorical way to say that ignorance and other taints, instead of thinking about "the mind" which "possesess" ignorance and taints?

kind regards!

constellation
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by constellation » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:11 am

So, friend, according to subject, the mind is something different from the mind processes and mind objects.
There is the presented untainted mind that gets tainted through ignorance and contact.
That present empirical base is the division between the mind and mind processes and an empirical base.
We should just say that "the mind" is just a label to group the 4 khandhas that are not 'rupa', and that those processes-khandhas do not have essential properties not presented.
We should just say that "the mind is tainted" is just a metaphorical way to think that ignorance and other taints, revealing so the thinking about "the mind" which "possesess" ignorance and taints.

FIVE AGGREGATES Conditional-Origination.pdf



Friend, there is other question. Who is doing the "attaching"?

So, there is The Greatest Friendship.
Treasury of Dharma and The Surangama Sutra
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=34019
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=34019&p=507104#p507104

budo
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by budo » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:48 am

constellation wrote:
Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:59 pm

skill in some task that one is doing _part 2_.pdf
This PDF is an example of why Vissuddhimagga's interpretation is different than the sutta interpretation.

According to that PDF and Vissuddhimagga, it's the end of the second tetrad of Anapanasati one enters first jhana, but actually this is not correct.

It's actually the end of the first tetrad and the beginning of the second tetrad where one has entered First Jhana.. You can see this by comparing Anapansati to Kayagata-sati sutta and the sutta on Questions and Answers with a nun. There is also no "counterpart sign" defined in those suttas.

From both Kayagatasati sutta and Anapanasati sutta
"Breathing in long, he discerns, 'I am breathing in long'; or breathing out long, he discerns, 'I am breathing out long.' Or breathing in short, he discerns, 'I am breathing in short'; or breathing out short, he discerns, 'I am breathing out short.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in sensitive to the entire body.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out sensitive to the entire body.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in calming bodily fabrication.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out calming bodily fabrication.' And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.
So as you can see vitakka and vicara jhana factors are already established in the first tetrad by putting attention on the breath. When one is calming the bodily fabrications, it means they're calming the breath.. As a result piti and sukha arise

The arising of piti and sukkha IS already first jhana, which Kayagatisati sutta shows with the standard jhana formula, and which anapanasati reflects here in the second tetrad.
"[5] He trains himself, 'I will breathe in sensitive to rapture.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out sensitive to rapture.' [6] He trains himself, 'I will breathe in sensitive to pleasure.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out sensitive to pleasure.'
The second half of the second tetrad is for attaining Fourth jhana by calming mental fabrications, mental fabrications in the Questions and Answers sutta is defined as "Feelings and Perceptions", in this case it's referring to calming feelings first, and then perceptions later by entering formless jhanas. Jhanas 2-3 is all about calming piti and sukha, and fourth Jhana is about equanimity, neither pain nor pleasure.
[7] He trains himself, 'I will breathe in sensitive to mental fabrication.'[4] He trains himself, 'I will breathe out sensitive to mental fabrication.' [8] He trains himself, 'I will breathe in calming mental fabrication.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out calming mental fabrication.'
The third tetrad is about repeated practice, and fourth tetrad is about attaining cessation through contemplation. This is why many people do not follow the Vissudhimagga, and prefer the suttas only.

The only time one should focus on a light, is in fourth jhana to attain abhinna. Furthermore the only sutta on Nimitta, is for attaining abhinna, https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

constellation
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Re: picture worth 1000 words: ✅☸ sammā samādhi, 4 jhānas vs. ⛔VRJ

Post by constellation » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:08 pm

According to that PDF and Vissuddhimagga, it's the end of the second tetrad of Anapanasati one enters first jhana, but actually this is not correct.

But, why this is not correct?

The document „skill in some task that one is doing _part 2_.pdf“ is inline with the Kayagata-sati sutta and the Anapanasati sutta.

But, why this is according to the reality as mentioned?
"Breathing in long, he discerns, 'I am breathing in long'; or breathing out long, he discerns, 'I am breathing out long.' Or breathing in short, he discerns, 'I am breathing in short'; or breathing out short, he discerns, 'I am breathing out short.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in sensitive to the entire body.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out sensitive to the entire body.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in calming bodily fabrication.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out calming bodily fabrication.' And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.

1) Mastery in entering the first Jhāna when one wants to.
2) Mastery in remaining in the first Jhāna for as long as one has determined.
3) Mastery in emerging from the first Jhāna at the determined time.
4) Mastery in adverting one’s attention to the factors of the first Jhāna after one has emerged from it.
5) Mastery in reviewing the factors of the first Jhāna.

Adverting and reviewing both occur in the same mind-door thought-process (manodvāra-vīthi). Adverting is performed by the mind-door adverting consciousness (manodvārā-vajjana), which in this case takes as its object one of the five Jhāna factors such as applied thought. Reviewing is performed by the four, five, six, or seven reviewing impulsion consciousnesses that occur immediately after the mind-door adverting consciousness, and which have the same object.

After that, to attain the (e.g. ānāpāna) second Jhāna, one reflects on the disadvantages of the first Jhāna and the advantages of the second Jhāna: the one has the two gross factors of initial and sustained application, which the other does not have. And determining to remove the two grosser factors, one concentrates on the (e.g. ānāpāna) paṭibhāga·nimitta again, to enter into Jhāna. Then one emerges from that Jhāna, and if one sees only three Jhāna factors (joy, happiness, and one-pointedness), it means one has successfully attained the (e.g. ānāpāna) second Jhāna. Then one develops the five masteries of that Jhāna.

In the same way, one removes the factor of joy to attain the third Jhāna, which has only happiness and one-pointedness. And one removes the factor of happiness to attain the fourth Jhāna, which has only one-pointedness and equanimity. One develops the five masteries for all the Jhānas.

1) Skill in adverting the mind to Absorption,
2) Skill in entering Absorption,
3) Skill in maintaining Absorption,
4) Skill in emerging from Absorption,
5) Skill in reviewing Absorption.

There is also no "counterpart sign" defined in those suttas, because the "counterpart sign" defined in those suttas through the rūpa.

The first aggregate is form/body (rūpa) (based on the image of corporeality, so imaged (rendered), being figurativeness (symbolic character)). Rūpa literally means picture or image because it is the object of eye-consciousness (cakkhuviññāna). Common translations of rūpa include form and body (shell). Every one of us has a body. If the body is short, you say, “I am short.” If the body is beautiful you say, “I am beautiful.” If the body is sick, you say, “I am sick.” So you can see how easily we associate the body with the ‘self.’

Finally we come to what is known as Mastery of the Jhāna (vasī). Vasī means experience, proficiency, skill in some task that one is doing. A man possessed of vasī is endowed with absolute mastery over something.

Literally the word vasī means “one who has power,” which here implies one who has power over his actions, who can do what he wants to do, as can a powerful man. He is able to act with proficiency, speed, and skill, unhindered by anything, and succeeding as he wishes. Power in practising samādhi is the result of skill in practice. The more skilful one is, the more power one acquires. Therefore the meaning of vasī here is precisely “one who has power because he has skill in means.” Such a person has skill in relation to Jhāna in five ways.

One develops the five masteries for all the Jhānas.

In vipassanā meditation, it is to meditate vipassanā
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Related topic: What does it mean _Meditation - Duration vs Quality_
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