Sawing our Personality

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
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Will
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Sawing our Personality

Post by Will » Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:51 pm

Although this sutta is aimed at monastics, lay folk can take to heart Buddha's advice. We in the West often prefer to adjust or alter people & conditions to make us comfortable or at least less irritated. Buddha goes against that stream of seeking personal protection and advocates putting up with practically anything or anyone. Whether from compassion, equanimity or however, Buddha's advice regarding irritating people or conditions is good Dhammic advice.

http://www.yellowrobe.com/component/con ... e-saw.html
Distrust everyone in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!
Nietzsche

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Will
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Re: Sawing our Personality

Post by Will » Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:31 pm

Bhikkhus, there are these five courses of speech that others use when they address you: their speech may be timely or untimely, true or untrue, gentle or harsh, connected with good or with harm, spoken with a mind of loving-kindness or with inner hate. When others address you, their speech may be timely or untimely; when others address you, their speech may be true or untrue; when others address you, their speech may be gentle or harsh; when others address you, their speech may be connected with good or with harm; when others address you, their speech may be spoken with a mind of loving-kindness or with inner hate.

Bhikkhus, suppose a man came with crimson, turmeric, indigo, or carmine and said: 'I shall draw pictures and make pictures appear on empty space.' What do you think, bhikkhus? Could that man draw pictures and make pictures appear on empty space?"—"No, venerable sir." Why is that? Because empty space is formless and non-manifestive; it is not easy to draw pictures there or make pictures appear there. Even the man would reap only weariness and disappointment.

Herein, bhikkhus, you should train thus: 'Our minds will remain unaffected...and starting with him, we shall abide pervading the all-encompassing world with a mind similar to empty space, abundant, exalted, immeasurable, without hostility and without ill will.' That is how you should train, bhikkhus
Distrust everyone in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!
Nietzsche

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retrofuturist
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Re: Sawing our Personality

Post by retrofuturist » Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:15 am

Greetings Will,

An excellent sutta with an excellent simile.

Thank you for sharing.

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

SarathW
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Re: Sawing our Personality

Post by SarathW » Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:50 am

Yes I like that Stta too. Lot of humour iln it too.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

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