Meditation to gain enlightenment?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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Ceisiwr
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by Ceisiwr » Sun Feb 01, 2009 9:59 pm

BBB

Looking at it again your absolutely correct. I suppose i should have said it means you dont have to do sitting meditation or achieve jhanas (although these things are of great help to most)

:namaste:

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bodom
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by bodom » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:28 pm

clw_uk wrote:BBB

Looking at it again your absolutely correct. I suppose i should have said it means you dont have to do sitting meditation or achieve jhanas (although these things are of great help to most)

:namaste:
Yep you are right. They both mutually support each other. If there is no meditation off the cushion, there will be no meditation on the cushion.

:namaste:
The heart of the path is so simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice.

Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing.

Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this-just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle.

- Ajahn Chah

rowyourboat
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by rowyourboat » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:31 pm

The Snake
10.8 "There are here, O monks, some foolish men who study the Teaching;9 having studied it, they do not wisely examine the purpose of those teachings. To those who do not wisely examine the purpose, these teachings will not yield insight.10 They study the Teaching only to use it for criticizing or for refuting others in disputation. They do not experience the (true) purpose11 for which they12 (ought to) study the Teaching. To them these teachings wrongly grasped, will bring harm and suffering for a long time. And why? Because of their wrong grasp of the teachings.

"Suppose, monks, a man wants a snake, looks for a snake, goes in search of a snake. He then sees a large snake, and when he is grasping its body or its tail, the snake turns back on him and bites his hand or arm or some other limb of his. And because of that he suffers death or deadly pain. And why? Because of his wrong grasp of the snake.

"Similarly, O monks, there are here some foolish men who study the Teaching; having studied it, they do not wisely examine the purpose of those teachings. To those who do not wisely examine the purpose, these teachings will not yield insight. They study the Teaching only to use it for criticizing or for refuting others in disputation. They do not experience the (true) purpose for which they (ought to) study the Teaching. To them these teachings wrongly grasped, will bring harm and suffering for a long time. And why? Because of their wrong grasp of the teachings.

11. "But there are here, O monks, some noble sons who study the Teaching;13 and having studied it, they examine wisely the purpose of those teachings. To those who wisely examine the purpose, these teachings will yield insight. They do not study the Teaching for the sake of criticizing nor for refuting others in disputation. They experience the purpose for which they study the Teaching; and to them these teachings being rightly grasped, will bring welfare and happiness for a long time. And why? Because of their right grasp of the teachings.

"Suppose, monks, a man wants a snake, looks for a snake, goes in search of a snake. He then sees a large snake, and with a forked stick he holds it firmly down. Having done so he catches it firmly by the neck. Then although the snake might entwine with (the coils of) its body that man's hand or arm or some other limb of his, still he does not on that account suffer death or deadly pain. And why not? Because of his right grasp of the snake.

"Similarly, O monks, there are here some noble sons who study the Teaching; and having learned it, they examine wisely the purpose of those teachings. To those who wisely examine the purpose, these teachings will yield insight. They do not study the Teaching for the sake of criticizing nor for refuting others in disputation. They experience the purpose for which they study the Teaching; and to them these teachings being rightly grasped, will bring welfare and happiness for a long time. And why? Because of their right grasp of the teachings.

12. "Therefore, O monks, if you know the purpose of what I have said, you should keep it in mind accordingly. But if you do not know the purpose of what I have said, you should question me about it, or else (ask) those monks who are wise.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nypo.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

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lppaefans
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by lppaefans » Tue Feb 03, 2009 10:46 am

siaophengyou wrote:Dear lppaefans,

What about the Perfections or Paramis ? One may not realize the Real Happiness without enough Parami.

metta,

siaophengyou

yes, that os importnat too.

one of my good dhamma brother told me that..thans sfor reminder. :clap:

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lppaefans
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by lppaefans » Tue Feb 03, 2009 10:51 am

bodom_bad_boy wrote:
clw_uk wrote:The scriptures are the message of the buddha, his disciples did study his word and reflect on it.

If one cannot get to a teacher then the suttas are extremely helpful to the practise.

:namaste:
They studied his word by putting into practice his word. Scriptural study is outward study. Practice is inward study.

"Do you know where it will end? Or will you just keep on studying like this? ...Or is there an end to it? ... That's okay but it's the external study, not the internal study. For the internal study you have to study these eyes, these ears, this nose, this tongue, this body and this mind. This is the real study. The study of books is just the external study, it's really hard to get it finished."

Ajahn Chah

See this thread: Practise vs suttra
http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... ead#unread" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Im not denying the importance of studying the Buddhas words. It is important but only if you use it as a guide and not take it to be the truth itself. I know this is cliche' but Its the finger not the moon.

:namaste:

i like your reply...

i am to it too..

able to see oneself is more imporant..

mindfulness is the tools to detect one mind running around... :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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Cittasanto
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by Cittasanto » Tue Feb 03, 2009 7:49 pm

Element wrote:
lppaefans wrote:...will mainly conducting mediation alone can leads one to enlightment?
In Buddhism, it is taught there are many paths to enlightenment, not only meditation.

Possibly someone knows the source of this teaching.

Meditation, recitation, teaching, hearing, discussing, reading and others can lead to enlightenment.
their is only one path that the buddha Taught the noble 8-fold path, each teaching is contained therein,
there is only one book worth reading The Mind
Blog, Suttas, Aj Chah, Facebook.

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.
John Stuart Mill

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retrofuturist
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by retrofuturist » Wed Feb 04, 2009 1:37 am

Greetings Manapa,
Manapa wrote:there is only one book worth reading The Mind
But how are you going to know how to read the mind, unless you learn how you're supposed to do? If the truth were that simple, it wouldn't have taken a Buddha to teach it.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"It is natural that one who knows and sees things as they really are is disenchanted and dispassionate." (AN 10.2)

“Truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.” (Flannery O'Connor)

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Cittasanto
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Re: Meditation to gain enlightenment?

Post by Cittasanto » Wed Feb 04, 2009 9:19 am

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings Manapa,
Manapa wrote:there is only one book worth reading The Mind
But how are you going to know how to read the mind, unless you learn how you're supposed to do? If the truth were that simple, it wouldn't have taken a Buddha to teach it.

Metta,
Retro. :)
Some preliminaries are necessary, but when practising what else should be read but the mind itself?
no book can ready us for just how difficult it can be, experiment, ask the all important WHY?
Blog, Suttas, Aj Chah, Facebook.

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.
John Stuart Mill

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