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Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:26 pm
by Laurens
I find mantras a very useful practise for staying centred and mindful when doing work or going about my day when the breath is not necessarily as easy to focus on. I am aware of the use of Buddho among the Thai Forest Tradition, but was just wondering whether there were any different mantras used in the Theravada tradition?

I know that the Buddha never taught mantra practise, but I do think it can be very effective, in some instances it has brought me to far more still states of meditation than anapanasati. So, spare me any replies telling me that the suttas never taught it, as I already know that.

I just find they are useful for my particular temperament, and wondered whether there were any different mantras to add to my toolkit, from this particular tradition.

:anjali:

L

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:41 pm
by Sam Vara
I've known the Forest Sangha to also teach "Dhammo" as a mantra.

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:56 pm
by JohnK
Metta phrases are bit like mantras.
I have heard (from lay teachers influenced by Theravada) of the use of "peace" on the in breath and "ease" on the out breath to aid settling the mind in difficult circumstances.
Another phrase I've heard referred to as a mantra is "not now" when noticing distracting thoughts -- it supports a non-aversive reaction to thoughts but reminds us that pursuing thoughts is not the task at hand.

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:42 am
by bazzaman
I believe that the practice of Buddhanusati used to be widely practised in Burma. The nine qualities of the Buddha were recited, and one bead of the rosary was rolled. These days people often used "clickers" instead of rosaries to do the counting.
Just speculation... but the use of rosaries might have been a remnant of previvious Mahayana/Vajrayana traditions before Theravada became dominant.

itipi so bhagavā arahaṃ sammā-sambuddho
Such indeed is the Blessed One : the worthy one, the one who has attained the perfect enlightenment.

vijjācarana-sampanno sugato lokavidū
the one who is consummate in knowledge & conduct, the one who has gone the good way, the knower of the cosmos,

anuttaropurisadamma-sarathi
the unexcelled trainer of those who can be taught,

satthā devamanussānam
the teacher of human & divine beings,

buddho bhagavāti
the enlightened one, the holy one.

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 12:16 am
by tamdrin
If you like mantras why not just learn some of the Mahayana or Vajrayana mantras? Vajrayana has millions of them.


In the forest tradition they use buddho, dhammo, sangho.

I have heard Ajahn anan also say you can use "lokavidu"


I think the point is not so much any magical power the words bring but the power that focusing on an object brings.

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 7:20 am
by Disciple
Mahayana/vajrayana is chock full of them. They have been useful to me and are especially good for those with a busy lifestyle. Not everyone can live like a monk unfortunately.

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 4:15 pm
by befriend
I like chanting namo Tasso bhagavato arahato samasambuddassa its devotional and calms my mind it's a gentle recollection of the Buddha and has made me experience rapture

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Aug 12, 2019 7:12 pm
by Buddho93
befriend wrote:
Tue Aug 06, 2019 4:15 pm
I like chanting namo Tasso bhagavato arahato samasambuddassa its devotional and calms my mind it's a gentle recollection of the Buddha and has made me experience rapture
I concur, it’s longer than Buddho but not too long that it’s difficult to memorise. It can be great for centering oneself 🙏

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:01 pm
by Wizard in the Forest

Re: Mantra in Theravada (aside from Buddho)

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:39 pm
by Aloka
Chanting a gentle and tuneful "Let go" to oneself can be helpful sometimes!

:)