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The Self and Desire and Aversion

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 7:34 am
by one_awakening
When meditating, I often reach the point where I can longer detect "The Self". It occured to me one day, that when there is no-self, there is no desire or aversion. The self and desire and aversion appear to be linked,

Re: The Self and Desire and Aversion

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:39 am
by Sam Vara
Yes.
"'The origination of self-identification, the origination of self-identification,' it is said, lady. Which origination of self-identification is described by the Blessed One?"

"The craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there — i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming: This, friend Visakha, is the origination of self-identification described by the Blessed One."

"'The cessation of self-identification, the cessation of self-identification,' it is said, lady. Which cessation of self-identification is described by the Blessed One?"

"The remainderless fading & cessation, renunciation, relinquishment, release, & letting go of that very craving: This, friend Visakha, is the cessation of self-identification described by the Blessed One."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

Re: The Self and Desire and Aversion

Posted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:15 pm
by paul
Desire and aversion, two unwholesome roots, are primal instincts connected with food gathering and maintenance of territory etc. and sometimes termed the monkey mind. Self identification arises and develops as an account keeper for desire and aversion, it keeps a record of what has been achieved and goads and plans for further acquisition. The revolutionary achievement of the arahant is that he/she is able to transcend the unwholesome roots through the process of insight wisdom.

Re: The Self and Desire and Aversion

Posted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 2:38 pm
by cappuccino
Body isn't self, consciousness isn't self, etc.

The teaching isn't no self, rather not self.