How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Factors of Enlightenment

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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R1111 = rightviewftw
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How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Factors of Enlightenment

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw » Sun May 14, 2017 7:28 am

Disclaimer: These are my own theories based on Sutta and Early Commentary, they may well be wrong tho. I will just assume that reader keeps it in mind and does his own research.

Sluggish/Tired Mind
"At such times, monks, as the mind is sluggish, that is the wrong time to cultivate the enlightenment-factor[1] of tranquillity, the enlightenment-factor of concentration, the enlightenment-factor of equanimity. What is the reason? A sluggish mind is hard to arouse by these factors.
"But, monks, when the mind is sluggish, that is the right time to cultivate the enlightenment-factor of investigation-of-states, the enlightenment-factor of energy, the enlightenment-factor of rapture.[2] What is the reason? A sluggish mind is easy to arouse by these factors.
Aroused/Active/Agitated Mind
"Monks, when the mind is agitated,[3] that is the wrong time to cultivate the enlightenment-factors of investigation-of-states, of energy, of rapture. Why? An agitated mind is hard to calm through these factors.
"When the mind is agitated, that is the right time to cultivate the enlightenment-factors of tranquillity, concentration, equanimity. Why? Because an agitated mind is easy to calm[4] through these factors.
A really easy way to remember this is that the Mindfulness(Sati) is always useful and that leaves us with 6 remaining factors, we can remember that the first 3 of those(Dhamma Vicaya, Viriya & Piti) are to be developed when mind is Sluggish and the remaining 3 for the Active Mind.

What are exactly the Factors of Enlightenment and How do we apply this in practice? will give you cliffs, i have not figured out all of it but it should give an idea, as always feel free to chip in some knowledge.

Factors of Enlightenment
i will list some common translations: Nyanasatta Thera further as (1), Piyadissa Thera (2), Burmese Pitaka (3), Thanissaro (4) Bhikkhu Bodhi (5)

Sati - Mindfulness (all)
Dhamma Vicaya - Investigation(1&2), Investigative Knowledge (3), Analysis (4), investigation-of-states (5)
Viriya - Energy (1,2), Effort (3), Persistence (4), Energy (5)
Piti - Joy (1), Happiness/Rapture (2), Delightful Satisfaction (3), Rapture (4,5)
Passadhi - Tranquility (1&5), Calm (2), Serenity (3&4),
Samadhi - Concentration (all)
Upekkha - Equanimity

Further there is a common formulae where Sila leads to non-regret and this is very important :
AN10.2 Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi“Bhikkhus, for a virtuous person, one whose behavior is virtuous, no volition need be exerted: ‘Let non-regret arise in me.’ It is natural that non-regret arises in a virtuous person, one whose behavior is virtuous.
* “For one without regret no volition need be exerted: ‘Let joy arise in me.’ It is natural that joy arises in one without regret.
Further without exerted volition:
Thanissaros Translation SN55.40 In one who has joy, rapture arises. In one who has rapture, the body becomes serene. When the body is serene, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes centered. When the mind is centered, phenomena become manifest.
So in short:
Avoiding slightest danger => Piti => Passadhi => Samadhi => Jhana

Practical How - To (for more details: Commentary to Satipatthana Sutta)

Sati = This one is pretty straight forward, when seeing arises know it as seeing, when thinking arises know it as thinking, when knowing arises know it as knowing, when breathing in long know it as breathing in long, when a feeling arises know it as feeling, know mindstates as mindstates, without extrapolating on the particulars.

Dhamma Vicaya = Investigating the Aggregates & Learning about the Dhammas. Recommend reading the Sutta:
SN 22.57 “And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu a triple investigator? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu investigates by way of the elements, by way of the sense bases, and by way of dependent origination. It is in such a way that a bhikkhu is a triple investigator...
Learning and poundering the Dhamma, The Aggregates & Insight Meditation. Commentaries also mention importance of person hygiene as conducive to learning.

Viriya= Reflection on Fearfulness on States of Woe, Introducing thoughts of Energy&Persistence into mind, thinking about virtues of Persistence, Endurance and Courage. Reflecting on the drawbacks of stagnation and being indolent. Associating with Energetic people, avoiding lazy ones.

Piti = Contemplating the Triple Gem, One's Virtue, Being inspired by the Dhamma, Delighting in the Dhamma to arouse the mind. Further entering the Jhana.
Piti SuttaSo you should train yourself, "Let's periodically enter & remain in seclusion & rapture." That's how you should train yourself.'

"Lord, when a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, there are five possibilities that do not exist at that time: The pain & distress dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is skillful do not exist at that time. When a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, these five possibilities do not exist at that time."
Passadhi = Calming of the Body & Mind. Settling one's quarrels, Harmony, Agreeable Weather, Fine healthy food, Avoiding restless people, seeking calm people and right reflection (3Cs)

Samadhi = Developing one-pointedness (non distraction), Training Jhanas, association with people collected in mind, Phenomena are known to the monk as they arise, known as they persist, known as they cease (non distraction leads to mindfulness & alertness) Read Sutta: Samādhibhāvanāsuttaṃ

Upekkha = Detached attitude conditioned by abundant Right Reflection on 3Cs and developement of the other factors of Enlightenment such as Concentration and Sati. Satipatthana Insight Meditation. Avoiding egoistical people, associating with people who impartial and equanimous towards things and people.

Mindfulness is Always useful and this is imo 90+% of what we should be focusing on
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3huNh4Vi8Jc
Comment on the importance of Moderation in Food:
when eating the most healthy meals available, once or twice a day leads to:
* Less craving because there is no longer an indulgence factor present as much, so mind is not inclined to seek pleasure from food
* Makes it easier to reflect on modes on Matter(Mode of cohesion in lumps of food, elements extrernal becoming internal and the whole digestion process)
* Most effective counter measure to Sluggishness and leads to Non-Regret
* Easier to practise mindfulness of Eating
* Not eating enough is also going to cause sluggishness. To me foods with healthy fats are good for sustained energy for the day, more so than cards only.
Last edited by R1111 = rightviewftw on Fri May 26, 2017 6:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Factors of Enlightenment

Post by Pseudobabble » Fri May 26, 2017 5:29 am

Thanks R1111, this is extremely useful. I have PDF'd the page for offline reference.
"Does Master Gotama have any position at all?"

"A 'position,' Vaccha, is something that a Tathagata has done away with. What a Tathagata sees is this: 'Such is form, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is feeling, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is perception...such are fabrications...such is consciousness, such its origination, such its disappearance.'" - Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta


'Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return.' - Genesis 3:19

'Some fart freely, some try to hide and silence it. Which one is correct?' - Saegnapha

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Re: How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Factors of Enlightenment

Post by rightviewftw » Thu Mar 15, 2018 2:03 pm

Avoiding drowsiness/Sluggishness, conservation & arousal energy by skillful means;
"As soon as you wake up, get up quickly, with the thought, 'I won't stay indulging in the pleasure of lying down, the pleasure of reclining, the pleasure of drowsiness.' That is how you should train yourself." Capala (Pacala) Sutta: Nodding
“Here, bhikkhus, extolling and disparaging and failure to teach only the Dhamma is a state beset by suffering … and it is the wrong way. Therefore this is a state with conflict.

“Here, bhikkhus, not extolling and not disparaging and teaching only the Dhamma is a state without suffering … and it is the right way. Therefore this is a state without conflict.
(excerpt from MN 139 Araṇavibhanga Sutta - The Exposition of Non-Conflict)
"Furthermore, Moggallana, should you train yourself: 'I will not visit families with my pride[3] lifted high.' That is how you should train yourself. Among families there are many jobs that have to be done, so that people don't pay attention to a visiting monk. If a monk visits them with his trunk lifted high, the thought will occur to him, 'Now who, I wonder, has caused a split between me and this family? The people seem to have no liking for me.' Getting nothing, he becomes abashed. Abashed, he becomes restless. Restless, he becomes unrestrained. Unrestrained, his mind is far from concentration.

"Furthermore, Moggallana, should you train yourself: 'I will speak no confrontational speech.' That is how you should train yourself. When there is confrontational speech, a lot of discussion can be expected. When there is a lot of discussion, there is restlessness. One who is restless becomes unrestrained. Unrestrained, his mind is far from concentration.
(excerpt from AN7.58)
Image
"A disciple of the noble ones considers this: 'I am not the only one who is owner of my actions, heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator; who — whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir. To the extent that there are beings — past and future, passing away and re-arising — all beings are the owner of their actions, heir to their actions, born of their actions, related through their actions, and have their actions as their arbitrator. Whatever they do, for good or for evil, to that will they fall heir.'
(excerpt from AN 5.57 "Subjects for Contemplation")
Kusita-Arambhavatthu Sutta: The Grounds for Laziness & the Arousal of Energy

"Monks, there are these eight grounds for laziness. Which eight?

"There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to do this work. But when I have done this work, my body will be tired. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the first grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk has done some work. The thought occurs to him: 'I have done some work. Now that I have done work, my body is tired. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the second grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk has to go on a journey. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to go on this journey. But when I have gone on the journey, my body will be tired. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the third grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk has gone on a journey. The thought occurs to him: 'I have gone on a journey. Now that I have gone on a journey, my body is tired. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fourth grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms in a village or town, does not get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: 'I, having gone for alms in a village or town, have not gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill myself up. This body of mine is tired & unsuitable for work. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fifth grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms in a village or town, does get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: 'I, having gone for alms in a village or town, have gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill myself up. This body of mine is heavy & unsuitable for work, as if I were many months pregnant. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the sixth grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk comes down with a slight illness. The thought occurs to him: 'I have come down with a slight illness. There's a need to lie down.' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the seventh grounds for laziness.

"Then there is the case where a monk has recovered from his illness, not long after his recovery. The thought occurs to him: 'I have recovered from my illness. It's not long after my recovery. This body of mine is weak & unsuitable for work. Why don't I lie down?' So he lies down. He doesn't make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the eighth grounds for laziness.

"These are the eight grounds for laziness.

"There are these eight grounds for the arousal of energy. Which eight?

"There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to do this work. But when I am doing this work, it will not be easy to attend to the Buddha's message. Why don't I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the first grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk has done some work. The thought occurs to him: 'I have done some work. While I was doing work, I couldn't attend to the Buddha's message. Why don't I make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the second grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk has to go on a journey. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to go on this journey. But when I am going on the journey, it will not be easy to attend to the Buddha's message. Why don't I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the third grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk has gone on a journey. The thought occurs to him: 'I have gone on a journey. While I was going on the journey, I couldn't attend to the Buddha's message. Why don't I make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fourth grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms in a village or town, does not get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: 'I, having gone for alms in a village or town, have not gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill myself up. This body of mine is light & suitable for work. Why don't I make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fifth grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms in a village or town, does get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: 'I, having gone for alms in a village or town, have gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill myself up. This body of mine is light & suitable for work. Why don't I make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?'[1] So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the sixth grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk comes down with a slight illness. The thought occurs to him: 'I have come down with a slight illness. Now, there's the possibility that it could get worse. Why don't I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the seventh grounds for the arousal of energy.

"Then there is the case where a monk has recovered from his illness, not long after his recovery. The thought occurs to him: 'I have recovered from my illness. It's not long after my recovery. Now, there's the possibility that the illness could come back. Why don't I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?' So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the eighth grounds for the arousal of energy.

"These are the eight grounds for the arousal of energy."
I also came across SEEING THROUGH - A Guide to Insight Meditation - by Ven. Bhikkhu K. Ñāṇananda
Which is a pleasant read and good ideas to entertain. Here is an excerpt from the book constituting a lovely commentary on Enlightenment Factors;
One's mind is well developed in the Factors of Enlightenment when one reaches a stage at which those factors
are lined up in a direct order. There is a certain lining up in one's mind. These factors are ‘sati’(mindfulness), dhamma-vicaya(investigation of mind- objects), viriya (energy), pīti (joy), passaddhi (calm or tranquillity), samādhi(concentration), and upekkhā (equanimity).

These are the seven Factors of Enlightenment.

Out of these seven, the first is sati–mindfulness. In enumerating these seven also, we see a certain order, a system. It is when mindfulness is purified that one comes to see the mind-objects clearly, which is called ‘dhammavicaya’ or investigation of mind-objects. That is to say, one sees to a certain extent, the mind-objects as they are. Then the mind is awake. The mind awakens when one sees mind-objects clearly.

Thereby one is able to recognize the good and bad, the skilful and the unskilful so that one can do what is necessary with those mental states. That is to say, the skilful ones have to be developed and the unskilful ones have to be abandoned. The knowledge of the means of doing this, is available through ‘dhammavicaya’or the investigation of mind-objects and that as we stated earlier, is made available through mindfulness.

With the understanding acquired through ‘dhammavicaya’ one puts forth energy–right endeavour –to develop the skilful and to abandon the unskilful states. This, therefore,is the third Factor of Enlightenment –the application of energy or ‘viriya’. Thus, we have sati, dhamma-vicaya and viriya.

As one puts forth energy, there arises joy, for, it is said: ‘āraddhaviriyassa uppajjati pīti nirāmisā’ –To one who has started up effort or energy, there arises a kind of spiritual joy which has nothing to do with the material. Thus one attains a certain amount of joy out of the very fact that one puts forth the right endeavour.

The meditator, well knowing that this joy is not the end of his endeavour, subdues it and attains to a calm or tranquillity which is called ‘passaddhi’. Through that calm or tranquillity, which is both physical and mental, he attains to a certain state of bliss which brings in its train, concentration.

Once concentration is attained, there is nothing more to struggle for, and so the meditator makes use of equanimity to stabilize his gains. The purpose of equanimity is to preserve the concentration one has attained. Also, this equanimity, as the culmination of the development of these Factors of Enlightenment, i.e., as the last of the seven factors, is nearer wisdom.

The word ‘sambojjhaṅga’ means ‘factor of enlightenment’ (sambodhi+ aṅga) and when the word ‘sambodhi’ is taken into consideration, it gives the idea of understanding or knowledge. It does not mean Buddhahood alone, but even arahanthood. So the lining up of these Factors of . Sila Sutta, Bojjhaṁga Sarimyutta, S.N.V.68 (P.T.S)

Enlightenment is for the purpose of understanding or knowledge. The factor that is nearest to understanding is equanimity.
It is when one has reached an equanimous state of mind that one can see things as they are. And in order to see things as they are, one has to have concentration or one-pointedness. That also is already mentioned, i.e., ‘samādhi’.

It is for the attainment of this concentration that the preceding factors beginning with mindfulness are made use of. When analysed thus, we see that there is a certain system – an order –in the enumeration of these Factors of Enlightenment.

There is also another way of analysing them.

That is to say, at the very start, one finds it difficult to develop these Factors of Enlightenment as in the case of the five faculties, namely, ‘saddhā’, ‘viriya’, ‘sati’, ‘samādhi’ and ‘paññā’–faith, energy, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom. When analysing these five faculties also, one sees a certain order.
There is a certain balancing necessary in their development.

One has to balance faith with wisdom and energy with concentration. In that context, mindfulness stands in the middle and fulfills the purpose. Its function is to balance the two sets – faith and wisdom, energy and concentration. Now in this context, mindfulness comes to the forefront. It is the leader.

Even as the leader, mindfulness fulfills a very important function. That, again, is the question of balancing. It marshals the other factors into a perfect line-up. Just as in the case of the faculties mindfulness stands in the middle and orders the other faculties, here too it comes to the forefront and marshals those factors that are behind it.

The three factors, dhammavicaya, viriya and pīti have a tendency to lean towards restlessness.
They are on the side of restlessness. When they happen to lean too much to that side, mindfulness orders them to straighten up.

Then there are three others which have a tendency to lean towards laziness, inertia or inactivity. Those three factors arepassaddhi, samādhi, upekkhā–tranquillity, concentration and equanimity. When they are leaning too much to that side, then also mindfulness orders them to straighten up. Thus among the Factors of Enlightenment also, mindfulness fulfills the function proper to it.

It is when all these are fully lined-up with this type of training, that one can say one's mind has attained a developed stage in the Enlightenment Factors
Additional on overcoming hindrances;
viewtopic.php?t=28920#p415866
Last edited by rightviewftw on Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:14 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Perceptions

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:53 pm

Perceptions and their timely development, they work and they work fast.

i am not responsible if people do this wrongly, failing to balance or if my assumptions are wrong. The way i organize and group this is all my own guesswork. I make this for my own training and experimentation. You are adviced by me to find a teacher and do your own research


These are to be developed and balanced. I will just leave this here for now and keep adding to it if i find something and i hope somebody can contribute.

Their timely development to cultivation goes more or less like this;
If the monk intent on heightened mind were to attend solely to the theme of concentration, it is possible that his mind would tend to laziness. If he were to attend solely to the theme of uplifted energy, it is possible that his mind would tend to restlessness. If he were to attend solely to the theme of equanimity, it is possible that his mind would not be rightly concentrated for the ending of the fermentations.
Furthermore;

If one is practicing a specific preception and it's expected result does not manifest, that is because of lack of development. If it does occur then the mind has been established in it. Note that several of these have more than one possible outcome and one should go for equanimity or both, ending up with resentment and a deathwish is probably not the optimal outcome.

Perception if impermanence;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of impermanence and abiding much in it, gain, honour and fame keeps away, it shrinks and rolls away. The mind stretches out and gets established in equanimity or loathing
Perception of non-self;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of lacking a self in unpleasantness and abiding much in it, whatever distinctions arise as superior, inferior or equal in the sixfold conscious body and all external signs, are appeased and well released.
Perception of ugliness or loathsomeness;
Perception of non-delight in the all worlds;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of non-attachment to all the world and abiding much in it, the manifold beauty of the world, keeps away, it shrinks and rolls away. The mind stretches out and gets established in equanimity or loathing.
Perception of all formations as undesirable;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of unpleasantness in impermanence and abiding much in it, a keen perception of fear, for laziness, distraction, negligence and non-reflection gets established, like to a slayer with raised sword.
Perception of light (daytime)
"... attend to the perception of light, resolve on the perception of daytime, [dwelling] by night as by day, and by day as by night. By means of an awareness thus open & unhampered, develop a brightened mind. It's possible that by doing this you will shake off your drowsiness.
Mindfulness of death,
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of death and abiding much in it, the desire to live keeps away, it shrinks and rolls away. The mind stretches out and gets established in equanimity or loathing.
I am subject to death; I am not exempt from death’ ... when one often reflects upon this theme, the intoxication with life is either completely abandoned or diminished.
‘I am not the only one who is subject to death, not exempt from death. All beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, are subject to death; none are exempt from death.’ As he often reflects on this theme, the path is generated.
Metta;
Compassion;
"When one gives birth to hatred/cruelty for an individual, one should develop compassion for that individual. Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.
Appreciation;
"Develop the meditation of appreciation. For when you are developing the meditation of appreciation, resentment will be abandoned"
Gladness; “altruistic joy” and “sympathetic gladness.”"Its function resides in being unenvious"

One who begins the development of gladness should not start with the dear person and the rest; for
a dear person is not the proximate cause of gladness merely in virtue
of dearness, how much less the neutral and the hostile person. One of
the opposite sex and one who is dead are also not the field for it.
85. However, the very dear companion can be the proximate cause for
it—one who in the commentaries is called a “boon companion,” for he is
constantly glad: he laughs first and speaks afterwards. So he should
be the first to be pervaded with gladness. Or on seeing or hearing
about a dear person being happy, cheerful and glad, gladness can be
aroused thus: “This being is indeed glad. How good, how excellent!”

For this is what is referred to in the Vibhaòga: “And how does a
bhikkhu dwell pervading one direction with his heart endued 10.
Muditá—“gladness” as one of the divine abidings is always in the sense
of gladness at others’ success. Just as he would be glad on
seeing a dear and beloved person, so he pervades all beings with
gladness” (Vibh 274). But if his boon companion or the dear person
was happy in the past but is now unlucky and unfortunate, then
gladness can still be aroused by remembering his past happiness and
apprehending the glad aspect in this way: “In the past he had great
wealth, a great following and he was always glad.” Or gladness can be
aroused by apprehending the future glad aspect in him in this way: “In
the future he will again enjoy similar success and will go about in
gold palanquins, on the backs of elephants or on horseback, and so
on.” Having thus aroused gladness with respect to a dear person, he
can then direct it successively towards a neutral one, and after that
towards a hostile one.
Equanimity;
For when you meditate on equanimity any repulsion (loathsomeness?) will be given up.
It seems to me that this is one way to do it:
Contemplating body as elements and thinking of them along following lines
"Rahula, develop the meditation in tune with earth. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people throw what is clean or unclean on the earth — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the earth is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with water. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people wash what is clean or unclean in water — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the water is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with fire. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when fire burns what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with wind. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when wind blows what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with space. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as space is not established anywhere, in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.
Old age;
‘I am subject to old age; I am not exempt from old age’ ... when one often reflects upon this theme, the intoxication with youth is either completely abandoned or diminished.
‘I am not the only one who is subject to old age, not exempt from old age. All beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, are subject to old age; none are exempt from old age.’ As he often reflects on this theme, the path is generated.
Illness;
I am subject to illness; I am not exempt from illness’ ... when one often reflects upon this theme, the intoxication with health is either completely abandoned or diminished.
‘I am not the only one who is subject to illness, not exempt from illness. All beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, are subject to illness; none are exempt from illness.’ As he often reflects on this theme, the path is generated.
Parting;
I must be parted and separated from everyone and everything dear and agreeable to me... when one often reflects upon this theme, the desire and lust in regard to everyone and everything dear and agreeable is either completely abandoned or diminished.
‘I am not the only one who must be parted and separated from everyone and everything dear and agreeable. All beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, must be parted and separated from everyone and everything dear and agreeable.’ As he often reflects on this theme, the path is generated.
Owner of Kamma;
I am the owner of my kamma, the heir of my kamma; I have kamma as my origin, kamma as my relative, kamma as my resort; I will be the heir of whatever kamma, good or bad, that I do’...when one often reflects upon this theme, misconduct by body, speech, and mind is either completely abandoned or diminished.
‘I am not the only one who is the owner of one’s kamma, the heir of one’s kamma; who has kamma as one’s origin, kamma as one’s relative, kamma as one’s resort; who will be the heir of whatever kamma, good or bad, that one does. All beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, are owners of their kamma, heirs of their kamma; all have kamma as their origin, kamma as their relative, kamma as their resort; all will be heirs of whatever kamma, good or bad, that they do.’ As he often reflects on this theme, the path is generated.
sources: Paṭhamasaññāsuttaṃ, Dutiyasaññāsuttaṃ, Nimitta Sutta, MN 62, AN 10.60, AN 07.058, AN 5.57, Vsm
Last edited by rightviewftw on Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:06 am, edited 9 times in total.

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DooDoot
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Re: How-To: Timely & Untimely Development of The Factors of Enlightenment

Post by DooDoot » Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:53 pm

“Here, bhikkhus, extolling and disparaging and failure to teach only the Dhamma is a state beset by suffering … and it is the wrong way. Therefore this is a state with conflict.

“Here, bhikkhus, not extolling and not disparaging and teaching only the Dhamma is a state without suffering … and it is the right way. Therefore this is a state without conflict.

(excerpt from MN 139 Araṇavibhanga Sutta - The Exposition of Non-Conflict)
Very pertinent quote for a forum such as Dhamma Wheel. Gratitude for posting it as a reminder to all. :namaste:

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