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posture

Posted: Sun Jan 03, 2016 4:47 pm
by befriend
mindfulness of posture is part of the first foundation of mindfulness, how does one practice it. thank you.

Re: posture

Posted: Sun Jan 03, 2016 6:16 pm
by thepea
befriend wrote:mindfulness of posture is part of the first foundation of mindfulness, how does one practice it. thank you.
When sitting with poor posture one can observe the misery produced.

Re: posture

Posted: Sun Jan 03, 2016 7:40 pm
by Pinetree
Not sure if this is what you ask, but what I practice is that when I am sitting, I know that I'm sitting, when I'm standing, I know that I'm standing, same for lying down, walking, etc.

Re: posture

Posted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 2:14 am
by mikenz66
Yes, that's what the sutta says. Being aware of whatever one is doing.
Furthermore, monastics, when a monastic is walking they clearly know ‘I am walking’; when standing they clearly know ‘I am standing’; when sitting they clearly know ‘I am sitting’; and when lying down they clearly know ‘I am lying down’. Whatever posture their body is in, they clearly know it.

In this way they meditate by observing an aspect of the body inside; they meditate by observing an aspect of the body outside; they meditate by observing an aspect of the body inside and outside.

They meditate by observing the reasons for the origination of the body; they meditate by observing the reasons for the dissolution of the body; they meditate by observing the reasons for the origination and dissolution of the body.

Or mindfulness is established that ‘There is a body’, to the extent necessary for knowledge and mindfulness. They meditate independent, not grasping at anything in the world. This too is how a monastic meditates by observing an aspect of the body.
https://suttacentral.net/en/mn10" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The aim, as I see it, is to be continuously aware of whatever is happening in the mind-body system. So whatever the body is doing is an important part of that. As the sutta continues:
Furthermore, when a monastics goes out and returns they act with awareness; when looking to the front and to the side they act with awareness; when bending and extending their limbs they act with awareness; when wearing the robes, and carrying the bowl and outer robe they act with awareness; when eating drinking, chewing, and tasting they act with awareness; when defecating and urinating they act with awareness; when walking, standing, sitting, lying down, waking up, speaking, and keeping silent they act with awareness.

In this way they meditate by observing an aspect of the body inside … This too is how a monastic meditates by observing an aspect of the body.
:anjali:
Mike

Re: posture

Posted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 2:49 am
by Dhammanando
A talk by James Baraz on the method of Ajahn Naeb, a Thai laywoman who specialised in mindfulness of the postures.

http://dharmaseed.org/teacher/86/talk/2571/

Re: posture

Posted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 1:51 am
by mikenz66
Very interesting talk, and worth a listen. Especially to the reactions of some of the audience to the message that any change in posture is due to dukkha...

:anjali:
Mike

Re: posture

Posted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 7:41 am
by SarathW
Yes it is a very informative talk.
Here he emphasises how posture can busede to realise Dukkha (stress)
He also briefly explain how posture can be used to realise Anicca (impermanence) and Anatta.

I also first time come to the understanding desire for concentration of one object is an aversion towards the changing nature of the objects.