Buddho Mantra

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
Dinsdale
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Dinsdale » Thu May 25, 2017 8:24 am

R1111 wrote:
Spiny Norman wrote:
massara wrote: Buddho is not a magical word, it`s just a trick that we use to prevent the mind from thinking about this or that.
:thumbsup:
Yes, and there are many "aids" to keep attention on the breath, including various counting methods. I've tried using "Budd-ho" but it doesn't do much for me. I sometimes use "rising" and "falling" on the in-breath and out-breath respectively, it seems more to the point, closer to the bodily sensations of breathing.

In any case I think these aids should be dropped once a basic level of focus and calm has been achieved, because they can detract from the direct experience of breathing.
There is a big difference between applying a counting technique to develop preliminary concentration and mentally noting establishment of Sati ie "rising &falling", "walking, walking" or "turning, turning".
Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
Buddha save me from new-agers!

R1111 = rightviewftw
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw » Thu May 25, 2017 11:10 am

Spiny Norman wrote: Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
The reference to the use of the mental noting as Mantra is found throughout the Suttas and the Vsm.
The Buddha says: he knows "i am breathing out long". As i see it this knowing is a clear thought that arises, it is not practically possible to know "i am breathing out long" without thinking it. Other examples are in the Vsm ie when doing Kasina meditation the meditator is repeating to himself "earth, earth, earth".

You don't have to agree, i know some teachers teach mindfulness without noting. I obviously don't think it is correct and there is no way i can be convinced otherwise so take it fwiw. Noting mentally is a lot harder to do and when developed the difference is obvious as day and night, as in Right Mindfulness and Wrong Mindfulness, tbh i don't think it is even possible to have Right Sati without the Clear Thought.

Dinsdale
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Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:32 am
Location: Andromeda looks nice

Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Dinsdale » Sat May 27, 2017 8:18 am

R1111 wrote:
Spiny Norman wrote: Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
The reference to the use of the mental noting as Mantra is found throughout the Suttas and the Vsm.
The Buddha says: he knows "i am breathing out long". As i see it this knowing is a clear thought that arises, it is not practically possible to know "i am breathing out long" without thinking it. Other examples are in the Vsm ie when doing Kasina meditation the meditator is repeating to himself "earth, earth, earth".

You don't have to agree, i know some teachers teach mindfulness without noting. I obviously don't think it is correct and there is no way i can be convinced otherwise so take it fwiw. Noting mentally is a lot harder to do and when developed the difference is obvious as day and night, as in Right Mindfulness and Wrong Mindfulness, tbh i don't think it is even possible to have Right Sati without the Clear Thought.
I use noting regularly myself in the context of satipatthana, including with mindfulness of breathing which is included in the first frame. I generally use noting as a way of focussing on a particular aspect of experience, and I mostly work with the sense bases, eg sensations, sights, sounds, states of minds, etc.

The point I was trying to make is that there are different approaches to practice, and it isn't one size fits all. So with mindfulness of breathing some people use aids like counting and mantra, while others don't - often there are pros and cons. Personally I think it is useful to explore different methods and then compare them.
Buddha save me from new-agers!

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