Buddho Mantra

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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ShanYin
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Buddho Mantra

Post by ShanYin » Thu May 29, 2014 7:10 pm

I have an active mind. It is hard to focus my thoughts on a subject. I've often heard people say things like 'you will never forget your blissful feelings in meditation' But I have in fact had blissful feelings, and I don't remember them.

I googled the "Buddo" mantra. Because I remember hearing about it that it is good for an active mind.

Recently I just tried to say Buddho, in my mind, while focusing on the effect of breathing on the belly. The sensations in the belly of breathing, the rising and falling. Is this the correct way or a good way to do the Buddho mantra? I used to focus on my nose-tip, but I find that to hard to do now, I don't really feel it on the nose.

I want to practice concentration so I will have an overly active, cloudy mind that cannot analyze and it out of touch.

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Mkoll
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Mkoll » Thu May 29, 2014 7:51 pm

Ajahn Lee wrote a piece on meditation that includes Buddho instructions.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/lee/themes.html

Also, a lot of the other Thai forest masters have instructions related to "Buddho". Check out that same website: "Library >> Thai Forest".
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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acinteyyo
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by acinteyyo » Thu May 29, 2014 10:15 pm

ShanYin wrote:Recently I just tried to say Buddho, in my mind, while focusing on the effect of breathing on the belly. The sensations in the belly of breathing, the rising and falling. Is this the correct way or a good way to do the Buddho mantra? I used to focus on my nose-tip, but I find that to hard to do now, I don't really feel it on the nose.
It is one way to do it and if it works for you it's a good way.
Here are two talks which I found useful:
Just Do it - Ajahn Chah
The Path to Arahantship <- search for the word "buddho" in the pdf or start reading at page 11 last paragraph
and I found this -> http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=2552
best wishes, acinteyyo
Thag 1.20. Ajita - I do not fear death; nor do I long for life. I’ll lay down this body, aware and mindful.

ShanYin
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by ShanYin » Fri May 30, 2014 2:19 am

Such knowledge in this forum. Thanks again.

Also, does Forest Dhamma Books ship copies of the books? I suppose I could print them off but it would probably be cheaper and would be nicer to have hard copies. I could pay shipping... I would have to email them I suppose. Forest Sangha Publications only ship to the UK.

culaavuso
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by culaavuso » Fri May 30, 2014 2:32 am

ShanYin wrote:I suppose I could print them off but it would probably be cheaper and would be nicer to have hard copies.
The book Keeping the Breath in Mind and Lessons in Samadhi by Ven. Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo includes instructions on meditation methods using "Buddho". A printed copy of the book is available from Wat Mettavanaram's free book program.

jollybean
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by jollybean » Sat May 31, 2014 6:17 am

Here's a rare teaching by Ajahn Sao, the teacher of Ajahn Mun, on the topic of Buddho meditation...
In our day and age, the practice of going into the forest to meditate and follow the ascetic dhutanga practices began with Phra Ajaan Sao Kantasilo, the teacher of Phra Ajaan Mun and, by extension, Phra Ajaan Singh and Phra Ajaan Lee. Phra Ajaan Sao was inclined to be, not a preacher or a speaker, but a doer. When he taught his students, he said very little. And those who studied directly under him are now elders who speak very little, who rarely preach, having picked up the habit from their teacher. Thus, as Phra Ajaan Sao was not a preacher, I would like to tell you a little of the way in which he taught meditation.

How did Phra Ajaan Sao teach? If it so happened that someone came to him, saying, "Ajaan, sir, I want to practice meditation. How should I go about it?" he would answer, "Meditate on the word 'Buddho.'"

If the person asked, "What does 'Buddho' mean?" Ajaan Sao would answer, "Don't ask."

"What will happen after I've meditated on 'Buddho'?"

"Don't ask. Your only duty is simply to repeat the word 'Buddho' over and over in your mind."

That's how he taught: no long, drawn-out explanations.
You can read more about it here: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/phut/sao.html

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Jetavan
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Jetavan » Tue Nov 25, 2014 6:35 pm

jollybean wrote:Here's a rare teaching by Ajahn Sao, the teacher of Ajahn Mun, on the topic of Buddho meditation...

If the person asked, "What does 'Buddho' mean?" Ajaan Sao would answer, "Don't ask."

"What will happen after I've meditated on 'Buddho'?"

"Don't ask. Your only duty is simply to repeat the word 'Buddho' over and over in your mind."

....
In other words, Don't Ask; Don't Tell.

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Will
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Will » Sun May 21, 2017 1:56 pm

Focus your attention on the breath, keeping watch over it until you're clearly aware that, "This is the in-breath," and "This is the out." Once you can see clearly in this way, call to mind the virtues of the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, gathering them into a single word, "Buddho." Then divide "Buddho" into two syllables, thinking "bud-" with the in-breath, and "dho" with the out
Above is from Access to Insight and my dumb question is - Why is the single word used with the breath, Bud-dho, not Bud-dha ??
Distrust everyone in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!
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Jetavan
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Jetavan » Sun May 21, 2017 4:08 pm

Will wrote:
Focus your attention on the breath, keeping watch over it until you're clearly aware that, "This is the in-breath," and "This is the out." Once you can see clearly in this way, call to mind the virtues of the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, gathering them into a single word, "Buddho." Then divide "Buddho" into two syllables, thinking "bud-" with the in-breath, and "dho" with the out
Above is from Access to Insight and my dumb question is - Why is the single word used with the breath, Bud-dho, not Bud-dha ??
"Buddho" is the nominative form of "Buddha" (which is the vocative form). "Buddho" is the form of "Buddha" that you would use in a sentence that describes the Buddha engaging in an action, such as "Buddho gacchati", "The Buddha departs".

Now, why is the nominative used instead of the vocative, I have no idea.
Last edited by Jetavan on Sun May 21, 2017 4:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Will
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Will » Sun May 21, 2017 4:16 pm

Thank you Jetavan, then I think I will use Bud-dha, unless someone can give me a good reason not to.
Distrust everyone in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!
Nietzsche

R1111
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by R1111 » Sun May 21, 2017 4:24 pm

I would recommend following Mahasi instructions in my signature as you are already observing the rising and falling of the abdomen. The Mahasi Method will develop mindfulness and the establishment of it on the four foundations of Mind, Body, Feelings and Dhammas.

Derek
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Derek » Sun May 21, 2017 5:13 pm

Lunagphor Viriyang Sirintharo runs a six-month course on buddho meditation: http://www.willpowerinstitute.com/courses/

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massara
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by massara » Mon May 22, 2017 12:34 am

Will wrote:Thank you Jetavan, then I think I will use Bud-dha, unless someone can give me a good reason not to.
You can use whatever word you prefer, if it calms the mind, then it`s ok.
Buddho is not a magical word, it`s just a trick that we use to prevent the mind from thinking about this or that.
:thumbsup:

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Spiny Norman
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Spiny Norman » Tue May 23, 2017 10:28 am

massara wrote: Buddho is not a magical word, it`s just a trick that we use to prevent the mind from thinking about this or that.
:thumbsup:
Yes, and there are many "aids" to keep attention on the breath, including various counting methods. I've tried using "Budd-ho" but it doesn't do much for me. I sometimes use "rising" and "falling" on the in-breath and out-breath respectively, it seems more to the point, closer to the bodily sensations of breathing.

In any case I think these aids should be dropped once a basic level of focus and calm has been achieved, because they can detract from the direct experience of breathing.
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

R1111
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by R1111 » Tue May 23, 2017 11:13 am

Spiny Norman wrote:
massara wrote: Buddho is not a magical word, it`s just a trick that we use to prevent the mind from thinking about this or that.
:thumbsup:
Yes, and there are many "aids" to keep attention on the breath, including various counting methods. I've tried using "Budd-ho" but it doesn't do much for me. I sometimes use "rising" and "falling" on the in-breath and out-breath respectively, it seems more to the point, closer to the bodily sensations of breathing.

In any case I think these aids should be dropped once a basic level of focus and calm has been achieved, because they can detract from the direct experience of breathing.
There is a big difference between applying a counting technique to develop preliminary concentration and mentally noting establishment of Sati ie "rising &falling", "walking, walking" or "turning, turning".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gacWdRZdAzs&t=64s

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Spiny Norman
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Spiny Norman » Thu May 25, 2017 8:24 am

R1111 wrote:
Spiny Norman wrote:
massara wrote: Buddho is not a magical word, it`s just a trick that we use to prevent the mind from thinking about this or that.
:thumbsup:
Yes, and there are many "aids" to keep attention on the breath, including various counting methods. I've tried using "Budd-ho" but it doesn't do much for me. I sometimes use "rising" and "falling" on the in-breath and out-breath respectively, it seems more to the point, closer to the bodily sensations of breathing.

In any case I think these aids should be dropped once a basic level of focus and calm has been achieved, because they can detract from the direct experience of breathing.
There is a big difference between applying a counting technique to develop preliminary concentration and mentally noting establishment of Sati ie "rising &falling", "walking, walking" or "turning, turning".
Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

R1111
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by R1111 » Thu May 25, 2017 11:10 am

Spiny Norman wrote: Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
The reference to the use of the mental noting as Mantra is found throughout the Suttas and the Vsm.
The Buddha says: he knows "i am breathing out long". As i see it this knowing is a clear thought that arises, it is not practically possible to know "i am breathing out long" without thinking it. Other examples are in the Vsm ie when doing Kasina meditation the meditator is repeating to himself "earth, earth, earth".

You don't have to agree, i know some teachers teach mindfulness without noting. I obviously don't think it is correct and there is no way i can be convinced otherwise so take it fwiw. Noting mentally is a lot harder to do and when developed the difference is obvious as day and night, as in Right Mindfulness and Wrong Mindfulness, tbh i don't think it is even possible to have Right Sati without the Clear Thought.

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Spiny Norman
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Re: Buddho Mantra

Post by Spiny Norman » Sat May 27, 2017 8:18 am

R1111 wrote:
Spiny Norman wrote: Not in my experience. Noting applied consistently to one aspect of experience develops concentration. Try it and you will see.

And of course the practice is mindfulness of breathing, not mindfulness of counting, or "Buddho" or whatever.
The reference to the use of the mental noting as Mantra is found throughout the Suttas and the Vsm.
The Buddha says: he knows "i am breathing out long". As i see it this knowing is a clear thought that arises, it is not practically possible to know "i am breathing out long" without thinking it. Other examples are in the Vsm ie when doing Kasina meditation the meditator is repeating to himself "earth, earth, earth".

You don't have to agree, i know some teachers teach mindfulness without noting. I obviously don't think it is correct and there is no way i can be convinced otherwise so take it fwiw. Noting mentally is a lot harder to do and when developed the difference is obvious as day and night, as in Right Mindfulness and Wrong Mindfulness, tbh i don't think it is even possible to have Right Sati without the Clear Thought.
I use noting regularly myself in the context of satipatthana, including with mindfulness of breathing which is included in the first frame. I generally use noting as a way of focussing on a particular aspect of experience, and I mostly work with the sense bases, eg sensations, sights, sounds, states of minds, etc.

The point I was trying to make is that there are different approaches to practice, and it isn't one size fits all. So with mindfulness of breathing some people use aids like counting and mantra, while others don't - often there are pros and cons. Personally I think it is useful to explore different methods and then compare them.
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

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