Relative access of practice

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
Post Reply
User avatar
Myotai
Posts: 513
Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2013 11:39 am

Relative access of practice

Post by Myotai » Tue May 02, 2017 11:57 am

Hi,

One of the things that I enjoyed when practicing in the zen (Soto) tradition was how available meditating was. For instance even sitting amidst the noisiest environments 'just sitting' was still accessible.

Since shifting my practice into a more (Burmese style) practice I am finding that I am needing more of a quiet environment to sit in.

Is this a fair assumption generally or is it my lack of understanding?

Thanks,

M

User avatar
Bhikkhu Pesala
Posts: 3743
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:17 pm

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by Bhikkhu Pesala » Tue May 02, 2017 1:19 pm

See Phra Yuttadhammo's explanation of why noting is difficult.
BlogPāli FontsIn This Very LifeBuddhist ChroniclesSoftware (Upasampadā: 24th June, 1979)

R1111 = rightviewftw
Posts: 1019
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:17 am

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw » Tue May 02, 2017 1:43 pm

I recommend noting "hearing, hearing, hearing" and "disliking, disliking" as well as "wanting, wanting" if you want it to be quiet. It should not bother you eventually as you make it into a meditation object.

paul
Posts: 1271
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 11:27 pm
Location: Vietnam

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by paul » Tue May 02, 2017 10:47 pm

As your profile picture shows, the Buddha directed people to go to a quiet place to meditate and time each day in a quiet environment is essential as a foundation. But when in a busy environment, renunciation of that very environment should be practised, that is, serenity and insight.

User avatar
Goofaholix
Posts: 2978
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:49 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by Goofaholix » Wed May 03, 2017 12:00 am

It depends on how you are practicing. Both practices are designed to enhance moment to moment awareness. Just sitting promotes awareness passively in a general way but the risk is that it will be dull, non specific or spaced out. Mahasi technique promotes awareness actively but the risk is the technique will get in the way or feel clunky or exhausting.

As far as meditating in a noisy environment this is only a problem if you think being aware of hearing and/or reactivity to noise is not what you should be doing, or if you're trying to develop concentration. If noise is the most constant experience then in both practices being aware of hearing and/or reactivity to noise is what you should be doing.
“Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it.” ― Ajahn Chah

User avatar
Myotai
Posts: 513
Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2013 11:39 am

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by Myotai » Wed May 03, 2017 5:03 pm

Thanks...all helpful stuff :)

philosopher
Posts: 151
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:48 pm

Re: Relative access of practice

Post by philosopher » Fri Sep 21, 2018 2:38 am

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
Tue May 02, 2017 1:19 pm
See Phra Yuttadhammo's explanation of why noting is difficult.
I really enjoyed this talk; thanks for posting. :anjali:

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 38 guests