Theravada in Vietnam

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pilgrim
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Theravada in Vietnam

Post by pilgrim » Sun Jan 08, 2012 12:09 am

A thesis wriiten on the Introduction and rise of Theravada in vietnam ( pdf file)
http://www.mcu.ac.th/userfiles/file/lib ... is/818.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Bankei
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by Bankei » Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:48 am

Thanks. Looks interesting.
-----------------------
Bankei

auvoantic
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by auvoantic » Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:16 am

i'm a vietnamese, i live in hanoi
in hanoi, it seems like there are are 2 main theravada groups
they participated in the same places but thay have sub groups or somethings
1 the people practice under vien minh bikhhu

http://www.trungtamhotong.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2 the people who go to burma
some follow u tejaniya
few goenka

there are no theravada monks in hanoi

Sarva
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by Sarva » Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:04 am

Welcome Auvoantic :)
Would you recommend people living in non-buddhist countries that they visit Vietnam to help better understand Buddhist traditions?

Metta
“Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress.” — SN 22:86

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pilgrim
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by pilgrim » Tue Apr 17, 2012 7:12 am

Here's a list of Theravada temples in vietnam.
http://www.budsas.org/uni/u-gioithieu-p ... u-13vn.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

HCM means Ho Chi Minh City or Saigon
"Chua" means Monastery; "Nguyen Thuy" means Theravada.

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minh-khong
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by minh-khong » Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:21 am

Theravada exists in South VN from monks going to Thailand and Shrilanka. Most of VN is Mahayana from under the influence of China.
You can see this documentary clip - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjvGopI52_M" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

MK

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pilgrim
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by pilgrim » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:21 am

A more recent video of a monastery in Vietnam
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGTd_qLvTZo

sudanto
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A QUESTION

Post by sudanto » Mon Sep 21, 2015 3:51 pm

pilgrim wrote:A more recent video of a monastery in Vietnam
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGTd_qLvTZo" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
It is a good source of info as to Theravada temples.
Have a question. If a monk in Theravada tradition from another country wants to stay in a temple for a year or two in Vietnam,
Which one would u recommend?

Need ur feedback most.

TQ. Sudanto.

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pilgrim
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by pilgrim » Tue Sep 22, 2015 1:54 am

I spoke to a Vietnamese friend who was very discouraging. He said that staying long term is very tricky. The temple hosting your stay must obtain permission from the government which will ask a lot of questions regarding your intentions. Then there are limits to what one can do. Giving talks, almsround may be prohibited.

sudanto
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A reply

Post by sudanto » Tue Sep 22, 2015 7:54 am

I see. No chance for me then. Thanks for ur reply anyhow.

Good day.

Sudanto.

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pilgrim
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by pilgrim » Fri Oct 21, 2016 3:30 am

Found this beautiful monastery in Hue, Vietnam while surfing the Net.
Huyền Không Sơn Thượng
https://www.facebook.com/HuyenKhongSonThuong/

paul
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by paul » Sun Oct 23, 2016 10:18 am

Anyone considering going to Vietnam long term should be aware that the air pollution in Hanoi is on a par with Beijing.

vudcnh
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by vudcnh » Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:41 pm

Hi, I'm a Vietnamese, based in Hanoi. I'm a college student that have followed the path since high school.
The Theravada Buddhist scene in Hanoi is really small and almost everybody know each other.
However, they are gaining lots of interest.

The South and esp Saigon have a lots more monk and monastery. This group have their influence from Cambodia when a lay person in Vietnam, 100 of years ago work for the French government and start to familiarize himself with the monk and the teaching there.
What's problematic about the situation here is that the Buddhist Sangha ( theravada one) lacks a sort of leader so each monastery sort of exist on their own. There's not a strong sense of tradition. Most books are in Vietnamese. We receive a bit of funding from around asia to have free Buddhist books in the library here in Hanoi :thanks:

Another group that have quite a bit of following is people coming back from Burma. They are monks or nuns who practice with Burmese Master and they organise trip to go together. These groups tend to have their own teacher, space, contact and quite likely have little to do with each other.
There are people who follow Goenka, Pa-auk, U tejaniya and U Jotika, mahasi style. Some Buddhist goes on retreat that are organised in the south or malaysia.

The visa situation is certainly difficult and there is a lot of restriction on what one's can do. If you know our country, you will get the feeling that we are a police state. On the other hands, the vinaya code is not strict.

I will glad to take any of the question you have. But I'm a home person and stop going to gatherings since I entered college 3 years ago so I may not have the best gauge on the scene at the moment. :namaste:

Caodemarte
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by Caodemarte » Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:06 pm

One famous Zen monk in Vietnam consciously adopted some elements from Theravada, including monk clothing and meditation methods, on the sensible ground that there should not be petty sectarianism in the Buddha Way and what was important was to work together to realize Buddhism by methods suited to the particular individual. This is much as Pure Land elements were brought into Vietnamese Linji style Zen, the dominant school in Vietnam. As as separate sect, “In the 1920s and 1930s, there were a number of movements in Vietnam for the revival and modernisation of Buddhist activities. Together with the re-organisation of Mahayana establishments, there developed a growing interest in Theravadin meditation as well as the Pali Canon. These were then available in French. Among the pioneers who brought Theravada Buddhism to the ethnic Đại Việt was a young veterinary doctor named Le Van Giang. He was born in the South, received higher education in Hanoi, and after graduation, was sent to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, to work for the French government. During that time he became especially interested in Theravada Buddhist practice and in 1940, upon an invitation from a group of lay Buddhists led by Mr. Nguyen Van Hieu, he went back to Vietnam in order to help establish the first Theravada temple for Vietnamese Buddhists, at Go Dua, Thu Duc (now a district of Saigon). The temple was named Buu-Quang (Ratana Ramsyarama). The temple was destroyed by French troops in 1947, and was later rebuilt in 1951. At Buu-Quang temple, together with a group of Vietnamese bhikkhus (monks), who had received training in Cambodia, such as Venerables Thien-Luat, Buu-Chon, Kim-Quang and Gioi-Nghiem, Venerable Ho-Tong began teaching the Dhamma in their native Vietnamese. He also translated many Buddhist materials from the Pali Canon, and Theravada became part of Vietnamese Buddhist activity in the country. In 1949-1950, Venerable Ho-Tong together with Mr Nguyen Van Hieu and supporters built a new temple in Saigon, named Ky-Vien Tu (Jetavana Vihara). This temple became the centre of Theravada activities in Vietnam, which continued to attract increasing interest among the Vietnamese Buddhists. In 1957, the Vietnamese Theravada Buddhist Sangha Congregation (Giao Hoi Tang Gia Nguyen Thuy Viet Nam) was formally established and recognised by the government, and the Theravada Sangha elected Venerable Ho-Tong as its first President, or Sangharaja. From Saigon, the Theravada movement spread to other provinces, and soon, a number of Theravada temples for ethnic Viet Buddhists were established in many areas in the South and Central parts of Vietnam. As of 1997, there were 64 Theravada temples throughout the country, of which 19 were located in Saigon and its viccinity. Besides Buu-Quang and Ky-Vien temples, other well known temples are Buu-Long, Giac-Quang, Tam-Bao (Da-Nang), Thien-Lam and Huyen-Khong (Hue), and the large Sakyamuni Buddha Monument (Thich-Ca Phat Dai) in Vung Tau.”http://www.tamqui.com/buddhaworld/Vietnamese_Buddhism
Last edited by Caodemarte on Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

paul
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by paul » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:37 pm

vudcnh wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:41 pm
Hi, I'm a Vietnamese, based in Hanoi. I'm a college student that have followed the path since high school.
The Theravada Buddhist scene in Hanoi is really small and almost everybody know each other.
However, they are gaining lots of interest.
Welcome to DW. Thank you for your offer to answer questions.
What motivated you to start Theravada?
http://www.forestdhamma.org/books/tieng-viet/

vudcnh
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by vudcnh » Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:49 pm

Hi Paul.
I guess because I was dealing with really strong emotions in high school esp 9th grade.
I was reading the blog zenhabit because I like the aesthetic of a simple life.
My family is going through trouble and I suffer a whole lot with my own mind. I was and probably still is this shy, super smart gay kid. It's hard to fit in and you sometimes don't see the point of fitting in. What people pursue just don't make sense to me. so I try to find a framework or a system to judge myself against.
So from there I start my little adventure around Hanoi. I was practicing meditation in a yoga studio. Going on little 3 days retreat. Read a ton of books from two library. Attend talk. All that makes me feel really inspired but I'm not very impressed with the practice they set up here. I want to travel to Thailand for ordination. But that's not my priority now.
The focus is to graduate and enter job market.
I have been really lax with my dhamma practice since college. I think what drag me back is this conspicuous dukkha I experience when I'm infected with a common STD. The fear of death, the separation and the dispassion with the human body.

vudcnh
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by vudcnh » Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:00 pm

Also I have to add that I'm forever indebted towards the man who translate the work into Vietnamese in your link.
His name is Pham Kim khanh, a lay man in Canada. He translate a still forest pool by Ajahn Chah. That book touch my heart and move me beyond words.

:bow:
I remember in my adolescent year, in one incident running from home for a day or two to go to a monastery with that book. I would sleep in that bed , holding that book and know that I would be fine.
I have read a few English books about Ajahn maha bua and the Mae chee. The library I used to go to have them for free from some organizations. The print quality is extraordinary.
I am slowly stepping out of my adolescent and albeit it was such a tultumous experience, I feel like I owe Lord Buddha my sanity. Or at least for a while, I am a high-functioning insane person. ,😃

mal4mac
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by mal4mac » Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:28 pm

vudcnh wrote:
Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:00 pm
Also I have to add that I'm forever indebted towards the man who translate the work into Vietnamese in your link.
His name is Pham Kim khanh, a lay man in Canada. He translate a still forest pool by Ajahn Chah. That book touch my heart and move me beyond words.
Yes, he is impressive. You can find many of his teachings free on the web:

https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-books/ ... jahn-chah/
- Mal

paul
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by paul » Mon Nov 27, 2017 3:10 am

This is what I deduce from your information.“Setting up a framework to judge yourself against” is a good beginning to Theravada practice, but at the same time you express dissatisfaction with conventional reality. The challenge contained in this duality, that is on the one hand the ideal found in the doctrine to keep striving towards, while on the other simultaneously having to live in conventional reality (you have opted for a career), is what keeps the practitioner moving forward on the path: the duality is a necessity. The processing instrument is mindfulness. Whether a monk or a lay person, conventional reality provides the raw material when seen with right view, so only enough should be taken in as can be processed, and the rest of the time should be devoted to contemplation, preferably in a wilderness situation and minimising the home life. From the position of faith and devotion, the movement to the work of insight cannot be accomplished until conventional reality has been relegated both in lifestyle and mentality. In Ajahn Maha Bua’s book ‘Samana’, he relates his emancipation to “overcoming conventional reality”.
The ideal found in the doctrine requires constantly increasing knowledge of the internal integrity of the dhamma to match the progress. In this integrity, the connection between sila and successful samadhi should not be overlooked in favour of the equally necessary but more discussed dynamic between serenity and insight. There are three trainings and two dynamics, but sila is the foundation and it requires an act of will.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/ati/tip ... .than.html
The last three factors in this sequence relate to the development of insight, the preceding group to samadhi.

vudcnh
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Re: Theravada in Vietnam

Post by vudcnh » Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:26 am

Code: Select all

 From the position of faith and devotion, the movement to the work of insight cannot be accomplished until conventional reality has been relegated both in lifestyle and mentality. In Ajahn Maha Bua’s book ‘Samana’, he relates his emancipation to “overcoming conventional reality”.
The ideal found in the doctrine requires constantly increasing knowledge of the internal integrity of the dhamma to match the progress. In this integrity, the connection between sila and successful samadhi should not be overlooked in favour of the equally necessary but more discussed dynamic between serenity and insight. There are three trainings and two dynamics, but sila is the foundation and it requires an act of will.
Wow. Thank you for pointing that out. A Dhamma friend of mind ( much older in age) tell me to stay where I am and not rush thing.
I live in the middle of a metropolis and have quite a busy life. I'm trying my best to wind down and have time for meditation. But I don't have much interest to go to Buddhist gathering. It's quite frightening. Maybe I should meditate in some meditation group in the rural part of Hanoi. It's hard to find wilderness here.
I realized with my intention of cooking healthier food so that I can keep myself in good shape this year, I started to become entrenched in household life. :rofl:

I do believe in the importance and necessity of samadhi.
Can you elaborate on " sila is the foundation and it requires an act of will" ? I understand the notion but fail to realize how to apply that truth to me.

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