I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

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Chanh Dao
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I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:12 pm

Just wanted to open up a page for discussion of what I'm experiencing and learning and for people to ask questions if anyones interested.

Staying at a lot of different temples, travelling everyday, soon will be in the mountains!

Also of course any other older monks I'd love to get some advice! I'm about 1 month ordained now. Still getting used to twisting those robes. Mine is very long and it's tough to keep it at the right length.

:)

Blessings 😁

paul
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by paul » Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:38 pm

Ajahn Chah lived that way for seven years and the Buddha travelled his whole life. Being resident in monasteries is the biggest difference with modern monastic life, and a serious departure from the Buddha's example, which promotes non-attachment and the wilderness experience. I once talked to a monk on tudong in Sri Lanka who was developing boils from not getting enough vegetables.
Last edited by paul on Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dharmacorps
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by dharmacorps » Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:55 pm

Thanks for posting. I am impressed/surprised you are able to use a computer on Tudong, Bhante. :anjali:

SarathW
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by SarathW » Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:42 pm

:hello:
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

Chanh Dao
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Fri Jan 11, 2019 5:49 am

Just a phone. I'd say like 80% or more of monks in Thailand have smartphones.

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rightviewftw
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:21 am

which dhutanga practices are you practicing?

Chanh Dao
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:01 am

Oh I've never heard that word before!

Travelling, living on the edge, different temple every night. Soon will go into the forests and mountains. Very exciting.
:thumbsup:

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rightviewftw
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:24 am

Chanh Dao wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:01 am
Oh I've never heard that word before!

Travelling, living on the edge, different temple every night. Soon will go into the forests and mountains. Very exciting.
:thumbsup:
I thought Tudong refers to Dhutanga which are the 13 ascetic practices recommended for monks;
Refuse-rag-wearer's Practice (pamsukulik'anga) — wearing robes made up from discarded or soiled cloth and not accepting and wearing ready-made robes offered by householders.
Triple-robe-wearer's Practice (tecivarik'anga) — Having and wearing only three robes and not having additional allowable robes.
Alms-food-eater's Practice (pindapatik'anga) — eating only food collected on pindapata or the almsround while not accepting food in the vihara or offered by invitation in a layman's house.
House-to-house-seeker's Practice (sapadanik'anga) — not omitting any house while going for alms; not choosing only to go to rich households or those selected for some other reason as relations, etc.
One-sessioner's practice (ekasanik'anga) — eating one meal a day and refusing other food offered before midday. (Those Gone Forth may not, unless ill, partake of food from midday until dawn the next day.)
Bowl-food-eater's Practice (pattapindik'anga) — eating food from his bowl in which it is mixed together rather than from plates and dishes.
Later-food-refuser's Practice (khalu-paccha-bhattik'anga) — not taking any more food after one has shown that one is satisfied, even though lay-people wish to offer more.
Forest-dweller's Practice (Araññik'anga) — not dwelling in a town or village but living secluded, away from all kinds of distractions.
Tree-root-dweller's Practice (rukkhamulik'anga) — living under a tree without the shelter of a roof.
Open-air-dweller's Practice (abbhokasik'anga) — refusing a roof and a tree-root, the practice may be undertaken sheltered by a tent of robes.
Charnel-ground-dweller's Practice (susanik'anga) — living in or nearby a charnel-field, graveyard or cremation ground (In ancient India there would have been abandoned and unburied corpses as well as some partially cremated corpses in such places.)
Any-bed-user's Practice (yatha-santhatik'anga) — being satisfied with any dwelling allotted as a sleeping place.
Sitter's Practice (nesajjik'anga) — living in the three postures of walking, standing and sitting and never lying down.

Chanh Dao
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:17 am

No tudong for me and for the monks in Thailand means more like ascetic practices in general. Travelling without plans, eating once a day or not at all.

Tudong mainly refers to ascetic practices as a monk in general. It's not such a formalized thing here in Thailand.

I'm with a quite famous tudong monk in certain circles we've been talking alot and he hasn't mentioned that word even once to me.

We are doing some of those things but the focus is more practical ascetism and less following a formal way of ascetic practice.

Move, adapt, meditate!

Chanh Dao
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:20 am

rightviewftw wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:24 am
Chanh Dao wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:01 am
Oh I've never heard that word before!

Travelling, living on the edge, different temple every night. Soon will go into the forests and mountains. Very exciting.
:thumbsup:
I thought Tudong refers to Dhutanga which are the 13 ascetic practices recommended for monks;
Refuse-rag-wearer's Practice (pamsukulik'anga) — wearing robes made up from discarded or soiled cloth and not accepting and wearing ready-made robes offered by householders.
Triple-robe-wearer's Practice (tecivarik'anga) — Having and wearing only three robes and not having additional allowable robes.
Alms-food-eater's Practice (pindapatik'anga) — eating only food collected on pindapata or the almsround while not accepting food in the vihara or offered by invitation in a layman's house.
House-to-house-seeker's Practice (sapadanik'anga) — not omitting any house while going for alms; not choosing only to go to rich households or those selected for some other reason as relations, etc.
One-sessioner's practice (ekasanik'anga) — eating one meal a day and refusing other food offered before midday. (Those Gone Forth may not, unless ill, partake of food from midday until dawn the next day.)
Bowl-food-eater's Practice (pattapindik'anga) — eating food from his bowl in which it is mixed together rather than from plates and dishes.
Later-food-refuser's Practice (khalu-paccha-bhattik'anga) — not taking any more food after one has shown that one is satisfied, even though lay-people wish to offer more.
Forest-dweller's Practice (Araññik'anga) — not dwelling in a town or village but living secluded, away from all kinds of distractions.
Tree-root-dweller's Practice (rukkhamulik'anga) — living under a tree without the shelter of a roof.
Open-air-dweller's Practice (abbhokasik'anga) — refusing a roof and a tree-root, the practice may be undertaken sheltered by a tent of robes.
Charnel-ground-dweller's Practice (susanik'anga) — living in or nearby a charnel-field, graveyard or cremation ground (In ancient India there would have been abandoned and unburied corpses as well as some partially cremated corpses in such places.)
Any-bed-user's Practice (yatha-santhatik'anga) — being satisfied with any dwelling allotted as a sleeping place.
Sitter's Practice (nesajjik'anga) — living in the three postures of walking, standing and sitting and never lying down.

It's all about letting go of attachment. To everything! Even things like the things your listing. It's fine to be aware of them but never attach!

The life of a mountain hermit rairly involves following some kind of *rules* for ascetism.

Letting go of even the dhutangha I walk this path one step at a time, one breath at a time :)

:twothumbsup: :namaste:

Blessings for you my friend.

Chanh Dao
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Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2018 2:39 am

Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:35 am

rightviewftw wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:24 am
Chanh Dao wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:01 am
Oh I've never heard that word before!

Travelling, living on the edge, different temple every night. Soon will go into the forests and mountains. Very exciting.
:thumbsup:
I thought Tudong refers to Dhutanga which are the 13 ascetic practices recommended for monks;
Refuse-rag-wearer's Practice (pamsukulik'anga) — wearing robes made up from discarded or soiled cloth and not accepting and wearing ready-made robes offered by householders.
Triple-robe-wearer's Practice (tecivarik'anga) — Having and wearing only three robes and not having additional allowable robes.
Alms-food-eater's Practice (pindapatik'anga) — eating only food collected on pindapata or the almsround while not accepting food in the vihara or offered by invitation in a layman's house.
House-to-house-seeker's Practice (sapadanik'anga) — not omitting any house while going for alms; not choosing only to go to rich households or those selected for some other reason as relations, etc.
One-sessioner's practice (ekasanik'anga) — eating one meal a day and refusing other food offered before midday. (Those Gone Forth may not, unless ill, partake of food from midday until dawn the next day.)
Bowl-food-eater's Practice (pattapindik'anga) — eating food from his bowl in which it is mixed together rather than from plates and dishes.
Later-food-refuser's Practice (khalu-paccha-bhattik'anga) — not taking any more food after one has shown that one is satisfied, even though lay-people wish to offer more.
Forest-dweller's Practice (Araññik'anga) — not dwelling in a town or village but living secluded, away from all kinds of distractions.
Tree-root-dweller's Practice (rukkhamulik'anga) — living under a tree without the shelter of a roof.
Open-air-dweller's Practice (abbhokasik'anga) — refusing a roof and a tree-root, the practice may be undertaken sheltered by a tent of robes.
Charnel-ground-dweller's Practice (susanik'anga) — living in or nearby a charnel-field, graveyard or cremation ground (In ancient India there would have been abandoned and unburied corpses as well as some partially cremated corpses in such places.)
Any-bed-user's Practice (yatha-santhatik'anga) — being satisfied with any dwelling allotted as a sleeping place.
Sitter's Practice (nesajjik'anga) — living in the three postures of walking, standing and sitting and never lying down.

These sutras can give you a better idea of tudong practice as I know it.


https://www.hermitary.com/solitude/rhinoceros.html

And

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

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Manopubbangama
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Manopubbangama » Fri Jan 11, 2019 3:46 pm

Chanh Dao wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:17 am
No tudong for me and for the monks in Thailand means more like ascetic practices in general. Travelling without plans, eating once a day or not at all.

Tudong mainly refers to ascetic practices as a monk in general. It's not such a formalized thing here in Thailand.

I'm with a quite famous tudong monk in certain circles we've been talking alot and he hasn't mentioned that word even once to me.

We are doing some of those things but the focus is more practical ascetism and less following a formal way of ascetic practice.

Move, adapt, meditate!
Seems like a way to get potentially sick.*

Maybe the dhamma practice involved keeps one healthy, I have no idea.

When I was in a tropical place (Brazil) I got sick quite a bit and being out in the wilderness with the insects excacerbate this.

Is this an issue and to hospitals take monks in for free in Thailand?


*Don't get me wrong, this practice is admirable for its dedication, its simple manly virility (viriya) and its conviction. A million times times better than the 'orgasmic buddhism' I see on the internet. I'm just curious if I could ever do it, considering my cold-hardy nature.
Buddhists, beware of spiritual transvestites.

paul
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by paul » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:49 pm

Tudong is just a Thai pronunciation adaptation of the word dhutanga.

"Thudong, (pronounce 'toodong,' from the Pali, dhutanga, — Austere Practices) — the wandering, ascetical, solitary and meditative life of some bhikkhus.
Crot, an umbrella with an attachable mosquito net."
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/aut ... el083.html

To take full advantage of wilderness areas a klot is recommended rather than staying in monasteries.

Chanh Dao
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by Chanh Dao » Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:03 am

Manopubbangama wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 3:46 pm
Chanh Dao wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:17 am
No tudong for me and for the monks in Thailand means more like ascetic practices in general. Travelling without plans, eating once a day or not at all.

Tudong mainly refers to ascetic practices as a monk in general. It's not such a formalized thing here in Thailand.

I'm with a quite famous tudong monk in certain circles we've been talking alot and he hasn't mentioned that word even once to me.

We are doing some of those things but the focus is more practical ascetism and less following a formal way of ascetic practice.

Move, adapt, meditate!
Seems like a way to get potentially sick.*

Maybe the dhamma practice involved keeps one healthy, I have no idea.

When I was in a tropical place (Brazil) I got sick quite a bit and being out in the wilderness with the insects excacerbate this.

Is this an issue and to hospitals take monks in for free in Thailand?


*Don't get me wrong, this practice is admirable for its dedication, its simple manly virility (viriya) and its conviction. A million times times better than the 'orgasmic buddhism' I see on the internet. I'm just curious if I could ever do it, considering my cold-hardy nature.

Many hospitals are free for monks.

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JamesTheGiant
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Re: I'm a young monk in Thailand doing tudong practice :)

Post by JamesTheGiant » Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:12 am

Ooh so interesting! I would have loved to do that as a bhikkhu in Thailand, but never got the chance.
I went to India and Nepal as a monk, and could have wandered there on tudong. But did not.
Oh lost opportunities, roads not taken...

There is a wandering bhikkhu in Australia, his lay name is Jason, he's a little famous.
And there is an Ajahn in New Zealand who goes on tudong for about a month every year, who drags reluctant junior monks from Thailand along with him... haha they're so used to city wat life, and then this mad western ajahn tells them to come and goes off with sandals and bags into the New Zealand countryside!

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