SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

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SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 8:53 pm

SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.
Translated by Piya Tan.


http://dharmafarer.org/wordpress/wp-con ... 7-piya.pdf

1. At Sāvatthī.

Summary

2. “Bhikshus,
dependent on the diversity of elements, there arises the diversity of perceptions; saññā
dependent on the diversity of perceptions, there arises the diversity of thoughts; sakappa
dependent on the diversity of thoughts, there arises the diversity of desires; chanda
dependent on the diversity of desires, there arises the diversity of passions [fevers]; pariāha
dependent on the diversity of passions, there arises the diversity of searching. pariyesanā

Analysis of perception

3. And what bhikshus is the diversity of elements (dhātu nānatta)?
The form element. rūpa,dhātu
The sound element. sadda,dhātu
The smell element. gandha,dhātu
The taste element. rasa,dhātu
The touch element. photthabba,dhātu
The mind-object element. dhamma,dhātu
This, bhikshus, is called the diversity of elements.

4. And how, bhikshus, is it that
dependent on the diversity of elements, there arises the diversity of perceptions: saññā nānatta
dependent on the diversity of perceptions, there arises the diversity of thoughts: sakappa nānatta
dependent on the diversity of thoughts, there arises the diversity of desires; chanda nānatta
dependent on the diversity of desires, there arises the diversity of passions; pariāha nānatta
dependent on the diversity of passions, there arises the diversity of searching? pariyesanā nānatta

The reflection

5. (1) Dependent on the form element, there arises the perception of form;
dependent on the perception of form, there arises the thought regarding form;
dependent on the thought regarding form, there arises the desire for form;
dependent on the desire for form, there arises the passion for form;
dependent on the passion for form, there arises the searching for form.[13]

6. (2) Dependent on the sound element, there arises the perception of sound;
dependent on the perception of sound, there arises the thought regarding sound;
dependent on the thought regarding sound, there arises the desire for sound;
dependent on the desire for sound, there arises the passion for sound;
dependent on the passion for sound, there arises the searching for sound.

7. (3) Dependent on the smell element, there arises the perception of smell;
dependent on the perception of smell, there arises the thought regarding smell;
dependent on the thought regarding smell, there arises the desire for smell;
dependent on the desire for smell, there arises the passion for smell;
dependent on the passion for smell, there arises the searching for smell.

8. (4) Dependent on the taste element, there arises the perception of taste;
dependent on the perception of taste, there arises the thought regarding taste;
dependent on the thought regarding taste, there arises the desire for taste;
dependent on the desire for taste, there arises the passion for taste;
dependent on the passion for taste, there arises the searching for taste.

9. (5) Dependent on the touch element, there arises the perception of touch;
dependent on the perception of touch, there arises the thought regarding touch;
dependent on the thought regarding touch, there arises the desire for touch;
dependent on the desire for touch, there arises the passion for touch;
dependent on the passion for touch, there arises the searching for touch.

10. (6) Dependent on the mind-object element, there arises the perception of mind-object;
dependent on the perception of mind-object, there arises the thought regarding mind-object;
dependent on the thought regarding mind-object, there arises the desire for mind-object;
dependent on the desire for mind-object, there arises the passion for mind-object;
dependent on the passion for mind-object, there arises the searching for mind-object.

Closing refrain

11. In this way, bhikshus,
dependent on the diversity of elements, there arises the diversity of perceptions,
dependent on the diversity of perceptions, there arises the diversity of thoughts;
dependent on the diversity of thoughts, there arises the diversity of desires;
dependent on the diversity of desires, there arises the diversity of passions;
dependent on the diversity of passions, there arises the diversity of searching.”

Notes

[13] Comy uses form here to explain the psychological process here: see notes in the PDF. .

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 8:56 pm

Note from Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation:

“In dependence on the form element there arises perception of form; in dependence on perception of form there arises intention regarding form; in dependence on intention regarding form there arises desire for form; in dependence on desire for form there arises passion for form; in dependence on passion for form there arises the quest for form....
  • Spk: Perception of form (rūpasaññā): the perception associated with eye-consciousness. Intention regarding form (rūpasaṅkappa ): the intention associated with three cittas—the receiving, (investigating, and determining cittas). Desire for form (rūpacchanda): desire in the sense of desirousness for form. Passion for form (rūpapariḷāha): passion (lit. “fever”) in the sense of a burning in regard to form [Spk-pṭ: for the fire of lust, etc., has the function of “burning up” its own support]. The quest for form (rūpapariyesanā): searching in order to obtain that form, having taken along one’s friends and comrades. Passion and the quest are found in different javana processes (so that passion can become an antecedent condition for the quest).

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 9:00 pm

Piya Tan's essay is worth studying:

Amongst the world religions, indeed in history itself, the first theory of perception is found in the
Buddha’s teachings—as in his analysis of sense-perception (sannā) found in the Madhu,pindika Sutta
(MN18).

This canonical version differs in some important aspects from the more developed Abhidhamma
and Commentarial version, but one feature is common to both, that is, that an act of complete perception
does not arise as an immediate result of the contact between the organ and the sense-object. Perception is
regarded a process of thought that begins as a simple sensation and ends up with the complete apprehension
of the object.
...
http://dharmafarer.org/wordpress/wp-con ... 7-piya.pdf


:anjali:
Mike

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by mikenz66 » Mon Aug 01, 2016 7:30 pm

Compare:
Dependent on the form element, there arises the perception of form;
dependent on the perception of form, there arises the thought regarding form;
dependent on the thought regarding form, there arises the desire for form;
dependent on the desire for form, there arises the passion for form;
dependent on the passion for form, there arises the searching for form.
To MN 18 The Honeyball (Bhikkhu Bodhi translation)
“Dependent on the eye and forms, eye-consciousness arises. The meeting of the three is contact. With contact as condition there is feeling. What one feels, that one perceives. What one perceives, that one thinks about. What one thinks about, that one mentally proliferates. With what one has mentally proliferated as the source, perceptions and notions [born of] mental proliferation beset a man with respect to past, future, and present forms cognizable through the eye.
And MN 133 Mahā Kaccāna and A Single Excellent Night (Bhikkhu Bodhi translation)
“How, friends, does one revive the past? One’s consciousness becomes bound up with desire and lust there thinking, ‘My eye was thus in the past and forms were thus.’ Because one’s consciousness is bound up with desire and lust, one delights in that. When one delights in that, one revives the past.
...
“How, friends, does one build up hope upon the future? One sets one’s heart on obtaining what has not yet been obtained, thinking, ‘May my eye be thus in the future and forms be thus!’ Because one sets one’s heart thus, one delights in that. When one delights in that, one builds up hope upon the future.
...
“How is one vanquished in regard to presently arisen states? In regard to the eye and forms that are presently arisen, one’s consciousness is bound up with desire and lust for that which is presently arisen. Because one’s consciousness is bound up with desire and lust, one delights in that. When one delights in that, one is vanquished in regard to presently arisen states.
:anjali:
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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by L.N. » Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:43 pm

How can this process be ended? Through a shift in perception, caused by the way one attends to feelings, using the categories of appropriate attention [see MN 2].
Thanissaro Bhikkhu

See also: Vedana Sutta: Feeling
Sire patitthitā Buddhā
Dhammo ca tava locane
Sangho patitthitō tuiham
uresabba gunākaro


愿众佛坐在我的头顶, 佛法在我的眼中, 僧伽,功德的根源, 端坐在我的肩上。

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by trejohn » Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:48 pm

L.N. wrote:How can this process be ended? Through a shift in perception, caused by the way one attends to feelings, using the categories of appropriate attention [see MN 2].
Absolutely!

Nice references and convergence.

Because attention should be always present BEFORE feelings hits satta, through contact. So perception can be "right perception" with no ensuing papañcas.
In other words, it seems like it is feeling that must be monitored by careful attention.
Therefore a shift of attention and its ensuing shift in perception.
When one attends wisely, unarisen taints do not arise and arisen taints are abandoned.
MN2

-------------------
"If, monk, with regard to the cause whereby the perceptions & categories of objectification assail a person, there is nothing there to relish, welcome, or remain fastened to ...
Thanissaro

“Bhikshu, as regards the source from which proliferation of conception and perception assails a person: if one were to find nothing there to delight in, nothing there to welcome, nothing to cling to...
Piya Tan

Yatonidānaṃ, bhikkhu, purisaṃ papañcasaññāsaṅkhā samudācaranti. Ettha ce natthi abhinanditabbaṃ abhivaditabbaṃ ajjhositabbaṃ (bound to).
MN 18
I believe the cause (source) to be feeling. Namely:
"If, monk, with regard to **feeling**, whereby the perceptions & categories of objectification assail a person, there is nothing there to relish, welcome, or remain fastened to — this is the end of:
the latent tendency of lust,
the latent tendency of aversion,
the latent tendency of views,
the latent tendency of doubt,
the latent tendency of conceit,
the latent tendency of desire for existence, and
the latent tendency of ignorance."
Although latent tendencies are not really taints, they effectively look alike for three of them (or four).

Here are some other suttas about the taints (with parallels):
And how, bhikkhus, should one know, how should one see, for the immediate destruction of the taints to occur? Here, bhikkhus, the uninstructed worldling, ... regards form as self. That regarding, bhikkhus, is a formation. That formation—what is its source, what is its origin, from what is it born and produced? When the uninstructed worldling is contacted by a feeling born of ignorance-contact, craving arises: thence that formation is born.
...
He may not regard form as self, but he regards self as possessing form.
...
He may not regard form as self or self as possessing form, but he regards form as in self.
...
etc.
SN 22.81
Also SN 22.55

It is also good to look at the nutriments of the hindrances in SN 46.2 (or SN 46.51):

- Lust > the sign (theme) of the beautiful: frequently giving careless attention to it is the nutriment for the arising of unarisen sensual desire and for the increase and expansion of arisen sensual desire.

- Ill will > the sign of the repulsive: frequently giving careless attention to it is the nutriment for the arising of unarisen ill will and for the increase and expansion of arisen ill will.

- Doubt > There are, bhikkhus, things that are the basis for doubt: frequently giving careless attention to them is the nutriment for the arising of unarisen doubt and for the increase and expansion of arisen doubt.
(instead of giving careful attention to mental qualities that are skillful & unskillful, blameworthy & blameless, gross & refined, siding with darkness & with light).

AN 3.68 which has only a partial parallel has this different for the Ignorance hindrance (apart from lust & ill will):
But what, friends, is the reason, what the cause, why unarisen delusion arises, or arisen delusion tends to growth & abundance?' 'Inappropriate attention,' it should be said. 'For one who attends inappropriately, unarisen delusion arises and arisen delusion tends to growth & abundance...'

------------------

As far as SN 25.5 is concerned, we can notice the following:

Feeling born of eye-contact is inconstant, changeable, alterable .
Cakkhusamphassajā, bhikkhave, vedanā aniccā vipariṇāmī aññathābhāvī (become otherwise, differently).
SN 25.5 (no parallel*)

*None of the Okkantika Saṃyutta (SN 25) have parallels.
Nor in the three SN 35 with aññathābhāvī is there parallels.

Alterable is a strange word in a doctrine that "seems" to think that there is no doer. Changeable AND alterable. Alterable by who or what?
Funny and strange that it does not have any parallels. It feels like shooting in your own foot.

------------------

Thanks and Metta.
No good!

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by Javi » Tue Aug 23, 2016 12:12 am

This is why renunciation and guarding the sense gates is absolutely paramount. Obsession with all of the diversity of perceptions is really difficult to escape, especially in today's world when it is only a click away. The dhamma is truly that which goes "against the stream" of seeking ever novel perceptions and sensations - a cycle which will never end up anywhere.
Vayadhammā saṅkhārā appamādena sampādethā — All things decay and disappoint, it is through vigilance that you succeed — Mahāparinibbāna Sutta

Self-taught poverty is a help toward philosophy, for the things which philosophy attempts to teach by reasoning, poverty forces us to practice. — Diogenes of Sinope

I have seen all things that are done under the sun, and behold, all is vanity and a chase after wind — Ecclesiastes 1.14

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Re: SN 14.7 Pariyesanānānatta Sutta. The Discourse on the Diversity of Perception.

Post by dhammacoustic » Tue Aug 23, 2016 12:01 pm

Wonderful sutta.

:anjali:

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