AN 10.20 Ariyavāsa 2: Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)

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AN 10.20 Ariyavāsa 2: Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)

Post by mikenz66 » Thu Nov 27, 2014 7:27 am

AN 10.20 (AN v 29) Ariyavāsa 2: Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi


http://suttacentral.net/en/an10.20

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Kurus near the Kuru town named Kammāsadamma. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus…. The Blessed One said this:

“Bhikkhus, there are these ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones abide in the past, present, or future. What ten?

“Here, a bhikkhu (1) has abandoned five factors; (2) possesses six factors; (3) has a single guard (4) and four supports; (5) has dispelled personal truths, (6) totally renounced seeking, (7) purified his intentions, (8) tranquilized bodily activity, and become (9) well liberated in mind and (10) well liberated by wisdom.

(1) “And how has a bhikkhu abandoned five factors? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned sensual desire, ill will, dullness and drowsiness, restlessness and remorse, and doubt. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has abandoned five factors.

(2) “And how does a bhikkhu possess six factors? Here, having seen a form with the eye, a bhikkhu is neither joyful nor saddened, but dwells equanimous, mindful and clearly comprehending. Having heard a sound with the ear … Having smelled an odor with the nose … Having experienced a taste with the tongue … Having felt a tactile object with the body … Having cognized a mental phenomenon with the mind, a bhikkhu is neither joyful nor saddened, but dwells equanimous, mindful and clearly comprehending. It is in this way that a bhikkhu possesses six factors.

(3) “And how does a bhikkhu have a single guard? Here, a bhikkhu possesses a mind guarded by mindfulness. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has a single guard.

(4) “And how does a bhikkhu have four supports? Here, having reflected, a bhikkhu uses some things, patiently endures other things, avoids still other things, and dispels still other things. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has four supports.

(5) “And how has a bhikkhu dispelled personal truths? Here, whatever ordinary personal truths may be held by ordinary ascetics and brahmins—that is, ‘The world is eternal’ or ‘The world is not eternal’; ‘The world is finite’ or ‘The world is infinite’; ‘The soul and the body are the same’ or ‘The soul is one thing and the body another’; ‘The Tathāgata exists after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata does not exist after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata both exists and does not exist after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata neither exists nor does not exist after death’—a bhikkhu has discarded and dispelled them all, given them up, rejected them, let go of them, abandoned and relinquished them. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has dispelled personal truths.

(6) “And how has a bhikkhu totally renounced seeking? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned the search for sensual pleasures and the search for existence and has allayed the search for a spiritual life. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has totally renounced seeking.

(7) “And how has a bhikkhu purified his intentions? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned sensual intention, intention of ill will, and intention of harming. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has purified his intentions.

(8) “And how has a bhikkhu tranquilized bodily activity? Here, with the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous passing away of joy and dejection, a bhikkhu enters and dwells in the fourth jhāna, neither painful nor pleasant, which has purification of mindfulness by equanimity. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has tranquilized bodily activity.

(9) “And how is a bhikkhu well liberated in mind? Here, a bhikkhu’s mind is liberated from lust, hatred, and delusion. It is in this way that a bhikkhu is well liberated in mind.

(10) “And how is a bhikkhu well liberated by wisdom? Here, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I have abandoned lust, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising; I have abandoned hatred … abandoned delusion, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising.’ It is in this way that a bhikkhu is well liberated by wisdom.

“Bhikkhus, whatever noble ones in the past abided in noble abodes, all abided in these same ten noble abodes. Whatever noble ones in the future will abide in noble abodes, all will abide in these same ten noble abodes. Whatever noble ones at present abide in noble abodes, all abide in these same ten noble abodes.

“These are the ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones abide in the past, present, or future.”

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Re: AN 10.20 Ariyavāsa 2: Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)

Post by mikenz66 » Thu Nov 27, 2014 7:31 am

AN 10.20 PTS: A v 29 Ariyavasa Sutta: Dwellings of the Noble Ones
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Qualities of mind in which noble ones are at home.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in the Kuru country. Now there is a town of the Kurus called Kammasadhamma. There the Blessed One addressed the monks: "Monks."

"Yes, lord," the monks replied.

The Blessed One said: "Monks, there are these ten noble dwellings in which noble ones have dwelled [in the past], dwell [in the present], and will dwell [in the future]. Which ten? There is the case where a monk has abandoned five factors, is endowed with six, guards one, is supported in four, has shaken off factional truths,[1] has thoroughly given up searching, is undisturbed in his resolves, is calmed in his bodily-fabrication, is well-released in mind, is well-released in discernment. These are the ten noble dwellings in which noble ones have dwelled, dwell, and will dwell.

"And how has a monk abandoned five factors? There is the case where a monk's sensual desire is abandoned. His ill-will... His sloth & torpor... His restlessness & anxiety... His uncertainty is abandoned. This is how a monk has abandoned five factors.

"And how is a monk endowed with six [factors]? There is the case where a monk, on seeing a form via the eye, is not gladdened, not saddened, but remains equanimous, mindful, & alert. On hearing a sound via the ear... On smelling an aroma via the nose... On tasting a flavor via the tongue... On touching a tactile sensation via the body... On cognizing an idea via the intellect, he is not gladdened, not saddened, but remains equanimous, mindful, & alert. This is how a monk is endowed with six [factors].

"And how does a monk guard one [factor]? There is the case where a monk is endowed with an awareness guarded by mindfulness. This is how a monk guards one [factor].

"And how is a monk supported in four [ways]? There is the case where a monk, carefully reflecting, follows one thing, tolerates another, avoids another, and destroys another. This is how a monk is supported in four [ways]. [2]

"And how has a monk shaken off factional truths? There is the case where a monk has shaken off the run-of-the-mill factional truths of run-of-the-mill brahmans & contemplatives — in other words, 'The cosmos is eternal,' 'The cosmos is not eternal,' 'The cosmos is finite,' 'The cosmos is infinite,' 'The soul & the body are the same,' 'The soul is one thing and the body another,' 'After death a Tathagata exists,' 'After death a Tathagata does not exist,' 'After death a Tathagata both does & does not exist,' 'After death a Tathagata neither does nor does not exist.' All of these he has thrown off, shaken off, renounced, vomited up, let go, abandoned, relinquished. This is how a monk has shaken off factional truths.

"And how has a monk thoroughly given up searching? There is the case where a monk has abandoned his search for sensuality... his search for becoming... his search for a holy life. [3] This is how a monk has thoroughly given up searching.

"And how is a monk undisturbed in his resolves? There is the case where a monk has abandoned his resolve for sensuality... his resolve for ill-will... his resolve for harmfulness. This is how a monk is undisturbed in his resolves.

"And how is a monk calmed in his bodily fabrication? [4] There is the case where a monk, with the abandoning of pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation & distress — enters & remains in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity & mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. This is how a monk is calmed in his bodily fabrication.

"And how is a monk well-released in mind? There is the case where a monk's mind is released from passion, released from aversion, released from delusion. This is how a monk is well-released in mind.

"And how is a monk well-released in discernment? There is the case where a monk discerns, 'Passion is abandoned in me, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising.' He discerns, 'Aversion is abandoned in me, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising.' He discerns, 'Delusion is abandoned in me, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising.' This is how a monk is well-released in discernment.

"Monks, all those in the past who have dwelled in noble dwellings have dwelled in these same ten noble dwellings. All those in the future who will dwell in noble dwellings will dwell in these same ten noble dwellings. All those in the present who dwell in noble dwellings dwell in these same ten noble dwellings.

"These are the ten noble dwellings in which noble ones have dwelled, dwell, and will dwell."


Notes

1. Pacceka-sacca.

2. For a discussion of the things to be tolerated, avoided, and destroyed, see MN 2.

3. On these three searches, see Iti 54-55.

4. Bodily fabrication (kaya-sankhara) is a technical term for the in-and-out breath. See MN 118, note 3.

See also: AN 4.28

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Re: AN 10.20 Ariyavāsa 2: Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)

Post by gavesako » Thu Nov 27, 2014 10:24 am

The three kinds of searches (esana) are interesting:

§ 54. {Iti 3.5; Iti 48}
This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "There are these three searches. Which three? The search for sensuality, the search for becoming, the search for a holy life. These are the three searches."

Centered,
mindful,
alert,
the Awakened One's
disciple
discerns searches,
how searches come into play,
where they cease,
& the path to their ending.

With the ending of searches, a monk
free of want
is totally unbound.
§ 55. {Iti 3.6; Iti 48}
This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "There are these three searches. Which three? The search for sensuality, the search for becoming, the search for a holy life. These are the three searches."


Sensual search, becoming-search,
together with the holy-life search —
i.e., grasping at truth
based on an accumulation
of viewpoints:
through the relinquishing of searches
& the abolishing of viewpoints
of one dispassionate to
all passion,
and released in the ending
of craving,
through the ending of searches, the monk
is devoid of perplexity &
desire.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... ml#iti-054
It seems the last one (brahmacariya-esana) is falling into the trap of views, which many spiritual seekers tend to get stuck on.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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