SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

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SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by mikenz66 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:23 am

SN 2.5 Damali Sutta
Translated by Bhikkhu Ñanananda


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... #passage-8

...near Saavatthi in the Jeta Grove...

Now Daamali, son of the gods, when the night was far spent... came into the presence of the Exalted One, and coming, saluted him and stood at one side. So standing he spake thus to the Exalted One:
  • Endeavor must herein be made
    By that saint who knows no fatigue
    That by abandoning sense-desires
    He may not hanker for existence.

    There is naught left to do, O Daamali,
    For the saint — so said the Exalted one.
    The saint is one whose task is done
    So long as he no footing finds
    A creature swept by river-currents
    Toils with all his limbs
    But finding a footing, when on dry ground he stands
    He toils no more: passed over, sooth, is he.

    A parable this, Daamali. Even so
    The saint whose cankers are extinct,
    Ripe in wisdom, given to Jhaana,
    On reaching the end of birth and death
    He toils no more: passed over sooth is he.[22]
Note

[22] Nibbaana is called 'apunaagamana' ('from which there is no coming back again') as it is an irreversible attainment. This transcendence of the world is often compared to a 'crossing-over to the further shore.' 'The saint having crossed over and gone beyond, stands on dry ground' (ti.n.no paara.mgato thale ti.t.thati braahma.no' — S. IV. 175, SN 35.238.) 'Once he has crossed over, the such-like one comes not back' ('paara.mgato na paceti taadii — Sn. v. 803, SNP 4.5). 'To the further shore they go not twice' ('na paara.m diguna.m yanti — Sn. V. 714, SNP 3.11). The sense of irreversibility is also conveyed by the term, 'akuppaa-cetovimutti' ('unshakable deliverance of the mind') signifying arahantship.

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by mikenz66 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:33 am

Bhikkhu Bodhi summarizes the commentary on this sutta:
  • Spk: This young deva believed that there was no end to the arahant’s duties and that the arahant must continue striving even after reaching arahantship. The Buddha spoke the rejoinder to correct him. The Buddha’s verse is unique (asaṅkiṇṇā) in the Tipiṭaka, for nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty.

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 3:50 am

I'm surprised there were no comments about this statement:
The Buddha’s verse is unique (asaṅkiṇṇā) in the Tipiṭaka, for nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty.
I gave Bhikkhu Nanananda's translation above. Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation of the particular verse is:
“For the brahmin there is no task to be done,
[O Dāmali,” said the Blessed One],
“For the brahmin has done what should be done.
While he has not gained a footing in the river,
A man will strain with all his limbs;
But a footing gained, standing on the ground,
He need not strain for he has gone beyond.
Thoughts?

:anjali:
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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by Mkoll » Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:12 am

mikenz66 wrote:I'm surprised there were no comments about this statement:
The Buddha’s verse is unique (asaṅkiṇṇā) in the Tipiṭaka, for nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty.
I gave Bhikkhu Nanananda's translation above. Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation of the particular verse is:
“For the brahmin there is no task to be done,
[O Dāmali,” said the Blessed One],
“For the brahmin has done what should be done.
While he has not gained a footing in the river,
A man will strain with all his limbs;
But a footing gained, standing on the ground,
He need not strain for he has gone beyond.
Thoughts?

:anjali:
Mike
It makes sense. While he's crossing the river, a man must swim. But once he's ashore, there's no need for that. Once a job is done, it's done. That work is over.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Kim OHara
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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by Kim OHara » Fri Aug 15, 2014 6:09 am

Yes, and "that work" is explicitly (in the first verse) the work of "abandoning sense-desires
[so that he] may not hanker for existence."

There may still be other work to do - helping others across the river, for instance - but "that work" is done.

:namaste:
Kim

[edited for clarity]

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 7:35 am

I was a little puzzled by:
The Buddha’s verse is unique (asaṅkiṇṇā) in the Tipiṭaka, for nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty.
We commonly see:
[e.g. http://suttacentral.net/search?query=sn+12.61]
When it is liberated there comes the knowledge: ‘It’s liberated.’ He understands: ‘Destroyed is birth, the holy life has been lived, what had to be done has been done, there is no more for this state of being.’”
:anjali:
Mike

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by Mkoll » Fri Aug 15, 2014 8:04 am

mikenz66 wrote:I was a little puzzled by:
The Buddha’s verse is unique (asaṅkiṇṇā) in the Tipiṭaka, for nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty.
We commonly see:
[e.g. http://suttacentral.net/search?query=sn+12.61]
When it is liberated there comes the knowledge: ‘It’s liberated.’ He understands: ‘Destroyed is birth, the holy life has been lived, what had to be done has been done, there is no more for this state of being.’”
:anjali:
Mike
I must be missing something. What is puzzling about it?
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by mikenz66 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 8:58 am

Many suttas talk about
"what had to be done has been done",
whereas the commentary states that:
"nowhere else does the Buddha criticize the arousing of energy, but here he speaks thus to show that there is a conclusion to the arahant’s duty."

Perhaps the "arousing of energy" part is unique, but "there is a conclusion to the arahant's duty" is not.

:anjali:
Mike

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Re: SN 2.5 Damali Sutta

Post by chownah » Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:44 am

I don't see any criticism.....am I missing something?
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