AN 10.21 Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion

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AN 10.21 Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion

Post by mikenz66 » Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:02 am

AN 10.21 (AN v 32) Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi


http://suttacentral.net/en/an10.21

“Bhikkhus, in the evening the lion, the king of beasts, comes out from his lair, stretches his body, surveys the four quarters all around, and roars his lion’s roar three times. Then he sets out in search of game. For what reason? With the thought: ‘Let me not cause harm to small creatures that might cross my track.’

“‘The lion,’ bhikkhus, is a designation for the Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. When the Tathāgata teaches the Dhamma to an assembly, this is his lion’s roar.

“Bhikkhus, there are these ten Tathāgata’s powers that the Tathāgata has, possessing which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the brahma wheel. [1983] What ten?

(1) “Here, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the possible as possible and the impossible as impossible. [1423] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the possible as possible and the impossible as impossible, this is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(2) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the result of the undertaking of kamma past, future, and present in terms of possibilities and causes. [1424] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is … the result of the undertaking of kamma … this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which he … sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(3) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the ways leading everywhere.[1984] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the ways leading everywhere, this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which he … sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(4) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the world with its numerous and diverse elements. [1985] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the world with its numerous and diverse elements, this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(5) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the diversity in the dispositions of beings. Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the diversity in the dispositions of beings, [1986] this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(6) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the superior or inferior condition of the faculties of other beings and persons. [1987] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the superior or inferior condition of the faculties of other beings and persons, this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(7) “Again, the Tathāgata understands as it really is the defilement, the cleansing, and the emergence in regard to the jhānas, emancipations, concentrations, and meditative attainments. [1425] Since the Tathāgata understands as it really is the defilement, the cleansing, and the emergence in regard to the jhānas … this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(8) “Again, the Tathāgata recollects his manifold past abodes, that is, one birth, two births, three births, four births, five births, ten births, twenty births, thirty births, forty births, fifty births, a hundred births, a thousand births, a hundred thousand births, many eons of world-dissolution, many eons of world-evolution, many eons of world-dissolution and world-evolution thus: ‘There I was so named, of such a clan, with such an appearance, such was my food, such my experience of pleasure and pain, such my life span; passing away from there, I was reborn elsewhere, and there too I was so named, of such a clan, with such an appearance, such was my food, such my experience of pleasure and pain, such my life span; passing away from there, I was reborn here.’ Thus he recollects his manifold past abodes with their aspects and details. Since the Tathāgata recollects his manifold past abodes … with their aspects and details, this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(9) “Again, with the divine eye, which is purified and surpasses the human, the Tathāgata sees beings passing away and being reborn, inferior and superior, beautiful and ugly, fortunate and unfortunate, and he understands how beings fare in accordance with their kamma thus: ‘These beings who engaged in misconduct by body, speech, and mind, who reviled the noble ones, held wrong view, and undertook kamma based on wrong view, with the breakup of the body, after death, have been reborn in the plane of misery, in a bad destination, in the lower world, in hell; but these beings who engaged in good conduct by body, speech, and mind, who did not revile the noble ones, who held right view, and undertook kamma based on right view, with the breakup of the body, after death, have been reborn in a good destination, in a heavenly world.’ Thus with the divine eye, which is purified and surpasses the human, he sees beings passing away and being reborn, inferior and superior, beautiful and ugly, fortunate and unfortunate, and he understands how beings fare in accordance with their kamma. Since the Tathāgata … understands how beings fare in accordance with their kamma, this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which … he sets in motion the brahma wheel.

(10) “Again, with the destruction of the taints, the Tathāgata has realized for himself with direct knowledge, in this very life, the taintless liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, and having entered upon it, he dwells in it. Since the Tathāgata has realized for himself … the taintless liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom … this too is a Tathāgata’s power that the Tathāgata has, on account of which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the brahma wheel.

“These, bhikkhus, are the ten Tathāgata’s powers that the Tathāgata has, possessing which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the brahma wheel.”

Notes:

[1983] From this point on the text is an expanded parallel of 6:64. See the latter for notes on the first, second, and seventh powers here. [This is why the note numbers seem mixed up.] The ten Tathāgata powers are also in MN 12.9–20, I 69–71, and here, and are analyzed in detail at Vibh 336–44 (Be §§809–31).

[1423] (1) Some examples of the possible (ṭhāna) and the impossible (aṭṭhāna) are at AN 1:268–95; MN 115.12–19, III 64–67[/url]; and Vibh 335–38 (Be §809).

[1424] (2) Ṭhānaso hetuso. Mp explains possibility (ṭhāna) as condition (paccaya). Following Vibh 338–39 (Be §810), it takes this to be knowledge of the conditions for kamma bringing a result in connection with four factors that can either reinforce or impede its maturation: realm (gati, one’s place of rebirth), acquisitions (upadhi, one’s body and mind), time (kāla), and effort (payoga). The cause (hetu) is the kamma itself.

[1984 ] (3) Sabbatthagāminiṃ paṭipadaṃ yathābhūtaṃ ñāṇaṃ. Vibh 339 (Be §811) identifies this with the Buddha’s knowledge of the paths leading to hell, the animal realm, the spirit world, the human world, the deva world, and nibbāna. See MN 12.37–43, I 74–77.

[1985] (4) Anekadhātunānādhātulokaṃ yathābhūtaṃ ñāṇaṃ. Vibh 339 (Be §812) defines this as the Buddha’s knowledge of the diversity in the aggregates, sense bases, and elements.

[1986] (5) Sattānaṃ nānādhimuttikataṃ yathābhūtaṃ ñāṇaṃ. Vibh 339 (§813) explains this as the Buddha’s knowledge of beings as having inferior or superior dispositions, and his understanding of how those with similar dispositions come together and meet.

[1987] (6) Parasattānaṃ parapuggalānaṃ indriyaparopariyattaṃ yathābhūtaṃ ñāṇaṃ. Vibh 340–42 (§§814–27) explains this as the Buddha’s knowledge of the condition of sentient beings’ diverse inclinations, underlying tendencies, temperaments, dispositions, intelligence, faculties, characters, receptivity, and potentiality. The terms are all explicated in detail. Mp is more concise, defining it simply as the Buddha’s knowledge of whether the five faculties of beings (their faith, etc.) are increasing or declining.

[1425] (7) The four jhānas are found throughout the Nikāyas. The eight emancipations (vimokkha) are at AN 8:66. The three kinds of concentration (samādhi) are at AN 8:63: concentration with thought and examination, without thought but with examination only, and without thought and examination. The nine meditative attainments (samāpatti) are the same as the nine progressive dwellings (anupubbavihārā) at AN 9:32. The defilement (saṃkilesa) is a quality that leads to deterioration; the cleansing (vodāna) is a quality that makes for distinction; and the emergence (vuṭṭhāna), according to Vibh 342–43 (Be §828), is the cleansing and emergence itself. “Cleansing” here means that proficiency in the lower jhāna is the foundation for the next higher jhāna; “emergence itself” means coming out from the jhāna.

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Re: AN 10.21 Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Jun 28, 2014 7:12 am

I'm having trouble figuring out how this simile works:
“Bhikkhus, in the evening the lion, the king of beasts, comes out from his lair, stretches his body, surveys the four quarters all around, and roars his lion’s roar three times. Then he sets out in search of game. For what reason? With the thought: ‘Let me not cause harm to small creatures that might cross my track.’
This suggests that the "lion's roar" is a warning to the small creatures. But how does that relate to teaching "the Dhamma to an assembly"?
“‘The lion,’ bhikkhus, is a designation for the Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. When the Tathāgata teaches the Dhamma to an assembly, this is his lion’s roar.
:anjali:
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Re: AN 10.21 Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion

Post by bananaporridge » Sat Jun 28, 2014 9:09 am

Perhaps.
Last edited by bananaporridge on Mon Jun 30, 2014 7:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: AN 10.21 Sīhanāda Sutta: The Lion

Post by mikenz66 » Sat Jun 28, 2014 9:24 am

Perhaps. This sutta we looked at recently: AN 4.33 describes some reactions to the lion's roar:
“Whatever animals hear the lion roaring for the most part are filled with fear, a sense of urgency, and terror. Those who live in holes enter their holes; those who live in the water enter the water; those who live in the woods enter the woods; and the birds resort to the sky. Even those royal bull elephants, bound by strong thongs in the villages, towns, and capital cities, burst and break their bonds asunder; frightened, they urinate and defecate and flee here and there. So powerful among the animals is the lion, the king of beasts, so majestic and mighty.
:anjali:
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