Buddhist Cryptids and Deities

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Wizard in the Forest
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Buddhist Cryptids and Deities

Post by Wizard in the Forest »

What are some of the cool non human non animal entities in Buddhist Cosmology and what are the names of those Gods that play the most important roles in the 32 realms of Saṃsāra?

I know Tavatimsa should have 33 but I don't know which 33 they are and I know they mentioned a few Gods like Brāhma Sahampati and Sakka and the Four Heavenly Kings but I would like to know as many as possible.
"One is not born a woman, but becomes one."- Simone de Beauvoir

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Dhammanando
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Re: Buddhist Cryptids and Deities

Post by Dhammanando »

The Traibhūmikathā ("Treatise on the Three Worlds") is a medieval Thai text based on the Pali commentaries that will probably tell you more than you ever wanted to know about devas, asuras, petas, etc.

Thai text and English translation
“Keep to your own pastures, bhikkhus, walk in the haunts where your fathers roamed.
If ye thus walk in them, Māra will find no lodgement, Māra will find no foothold.”
— Cakkavattisīhanāda Sutta

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Wizard in the Forest
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Re: Buddhist Cryptids and Deities

Post by Wizard in the Forest »

Thank you Venerable, Sir!

This is absolutely a pleasure to read. I am just so fascinated by the many realms and was surprised by the many qualities of Utarakuru and the Chakravartin Emperor.

Is there a similar texts that elucidate examples of Devatā whose qualities we should be recollecting when we practice Devānussati? I know only of a few of them and less about their qualities. I wish to know more about them, but I am gladdened and grateful by what you have shown me so far.

May your days be filled with Gladness and joy.
"One is not born a woman, but becomes one."- Simone de Beauvoir

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Dhammanando
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Re: Buddhist Cryptids and Deities

Post by Dhammanando »

Wizard in the Forest wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 1:12 am
Is there a similar texts that elucidate examples of Devatā whose qualities we should be recollecting when we practice Devānussati?
In devatānussati one doesn't recollect individual devas, but rather the different classes of them, with especial reference to the virtues that led to their becoming devas. The principal sutta source is the Mahānāmasutta:
“Furthermore, you should recollect the devas: ‘There are the devas of the Four Great Kings, the devas of the Thirty-three, the devas of the Hours, the Contented Devas, the devas who delight in creation, the devas who have power over the creations of others, the devas of Brahma’s retinue, the devas beyond them. Whatever conviction they were endowed with that—when falling away from this life—they re-arose there, the same sort of conviction is present in me as well. Whatever virtue they were endowed with that—when falling away from this life—they re-arose there, the same sort of virtue is present in me as well. Whatever learning they were endowed with that—when falling away from this life—they re-arose there, the same sort of learning is present in me as well. Whatever generosity they were endowed with that—when falling away from this life—they re-arose there, the same sort of generosity is present in me as well. Whatever discernment they were endowed with that—when falling away from this life—they re-arose there, the same sort of discernment is present in me as well.’ At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the conviction, virtue, learning, generosity, and discernment found both in himself and the devas, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the [qualities of the] devas. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.
https://legacy.suttacentral.net/en/an11.11
“Keep to your own pastures, bhikkhus, walk in the haunts where your fathers roamed.
If ye thus walk in them, Māra will find no lodgement, Māra will find no foothold.”
— Cakkavattisīhanāda Sutta

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