Eightfold path

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ShanYin
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Eightfold path

Post by ShanYin » Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:56 am

I want to talk to someone about my understanding of the eightfold path.

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by retrofuturist » Wed Oct 10, 2018 2:00 am

Greetings,

Sure... how do you understand it?

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"One discerns wrong view as wrong view, and right view as right view. This is one's right view." (MN 117)

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by ShanYin » Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:05 am

It's alot like it is shown in the book "blueprint for happiness". I have been dealing with alot with the negative emotion of fear. What is your understanding of it?

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by paul » Wed Oct 10, 2018 8:41 am

To bring it into a Theravada frame, please explain specifically what the negative aspects are that you referred to, and what your view of the NEP is.

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AgarikaJ
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Re: Eightfold path

Post by AgarikaJ » Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:02 pm

ShanYin wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:05 am
It's alot like it is shown in the book "blueprint for happiness". I have been dealing with alot with the negative emotion of fear. What is your understanding of it?
I am not sure which book you are talking about, there are several out there with this title.

As you have given us very little to work on, one thing to mention is, that Theravada does not try to make you 'happy' in the colloquial sense of the word and that overcoming personal fears is more or less a side effect of Practice, not its aim.
The Noble Eightfold Path tries to detach you from delusions and fetters, which are reinforced by our emotions. From this detachment, insight follows, firstly that our states of mind are impermanent. Everything else follows from there.

Coming back to fear. fear in the Theravada sense is coming from Aversion (Dvesha, one of the three character afflictions leading to Dukkha). Depending on your distinct fear, this might be rooted in self-loathing, or antagonism against something in your surroundings. To overcome Aversion, you could practice Metta bhavana and try to develop Sila (moral integrity).

I know that this sounds horribly dry and theoretical, almost to the point of being no help at all to somebody being seriously afflicted by an emotional issue. But if you would be more concrete in your specific needs, maybe a clearer advice will become possible.
The teaching is a lake with shores of ethics, unclouded, praised by the fine to the good.
There the knowledgeable go to bathe, and cross to the far shore without getting wet.
[SN 7.21]

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by paul » Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:29 pm

AgarikaJ wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:02 pm
firstly that our states of mind are impermanent. Everything else follows from there.

fear in the Theravada sense is coming from Aversion (Dvesha,
In Theravada as directed in the Sattipatthana sutta, the body is fundamental to meditation, for one it being much easier to recognize impermanence in materiality than in mentality.
Meditation should begin with one of the six subjects listed under the first foundation of mindfulness.
"In whomever mindfulness immersed in the body is not developed, not pursued, Mara gains entry, Mara gains a foothold.”—- MN 119

Excessive focus on mentality is therefore dangerous.

The Pali word for aversion is dosa. It is not profitable to suggest the mixing of Mahayana and Theravada components as they come from opposing contexts, the former advocating unity, while the latter always maintains the duality of samsara and nibbana.

ShanYin
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Re: Eightfold path

Post by ShanYin » Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:46 am

AgarikaJ wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:02 pm
ShanYin wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:05 am
It's alot like it is shown in the book "blueprint for happiness". I have been dealing with alot with the negative emotion of fear. What is your understanding of it?
I am not sure which book you are talking about, there are several out there with this title.

As you have given us very little to work on, one thing to mention is, that Theravada does not try to make you 'happy' in the colloquial sense of the word and that overcoming personal fears is more or less a side effect of Practice, not its aim.
The Noble Eightfold Path tries to detach you from delusions and fetters, which are reinforced by our emotions. From this detachment, insight follows, firstly that our states of mind are impermanent. Everything else follows from there.

Coming back to fear. fear in the Theravada sense is coming from Aversion (Dvesha, one of the three character afflictions leading to Dukkha). Depending on your distinct fear, this might be rooted in self-loathing, or antagonism against something in your surroundings. To overcome Aversion, you could practice Metta bhavana and try to develop Sila (moral integrity).

I know that this sounds horribly dry and theoretical, almost to the point of being no help at all to somebody being seriously afflicted by an emotional issue. But if you would be more concrete in your specific needs, maybe a clearer advice will become possible.
Yes it does sound dry and theoritcal. I have alot of anger that I deal with. I have a hard time focusing in meditation.

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AgarikaJ
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Re: Eightfold path

Post by AgarikaJ » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:02 am

paul wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:29 pm
The Pali word for aversion is dosa.
It is not profitable to suggest the mixing of Mahayana and Theravada components as they come from opposing contexts, the former advocating unity, while the latter always maintains the duality of samsara and nibbana.
Arghh, of course Dosa it is! :thanks:

My error of hastiness has turned an already shaky advice into something wholly confusing.

@ShanYin, pls take on my post only with this additional remark of @paul in mind!
The teaching is a lake with shores of ethics, unclouded, praised by the fine to the good.
There the knowledgeable go to bathe, and cross to the far shore without getting wet.
[SN 7.21]

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by paul » Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:20 pm

ShanYin wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:46 am
quote=AgarikaJ post_id=489313 time=1539270168 user_id=15052]
I have alot of anger that I deal with. I have a hard time focusing in meditation.
Your unwillingness to engage in suitable conversation works against the overcoming of anger:

Six things are helpful in conquering ill-will:

1. Learning how to meditate on loving-kindness;
2. Devoting oneself to the meditation of loving-kindness;
3. Considering that one is the owner and heir of one's actions (kamma);
4. Frequent reflection on it (in the following way):

Thus one should consider: "Being angry with another person, what can you
do to him? Can you destroy his virtue and his other good qualities? Have
you not come to your present state by your own actions, and will also go
hence according to your own actions? Anger towards another is just as if
someone wishing to hit another person takes hold of glowing coals, or a
heated iron-rod, or of excrement. And, in the same way, if the other person
is angry with you, what can he do to you? Can he destroy your virtue and
your other good qualities? He too has come to his present state by his own
actions and will go hence according to his own actions. Like an unaccepted
gift or like a handful of dirt thrown against the wind, his anger will fall back
on his own head."

5. Noble friendship;
6. Suitable conversation.

Commentary to
Satipatthana Sutta

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:49 pm

i like the micro and macro explanation of the 8FNP whereas the macro cultivation of the factors conditions the mind to eventually leads to the arising of a mind with eight path factors resulting in cessation.

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by retrofuturist » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:04 pm

Greetings,
rightviewftw wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:49 pm
i like the micro and macro explanation of the 8FNP whereas the macro cultivation of the factors conditions the mind to eventually leads to the arising of a mind with eight path factors resulting in cessation.
Are there any suttas you can point to, which explain what you're talking about here? This being the Discovering Theravada section, a Theravada source would be good.

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"One discerns wrong view as wrong view, and right view as right view. This is one's right view." (MN 117)

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:33 pm

retrofuturist wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:04 pm
Greetings,
rightviewftw wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:49 pm
i like the micro and macro explanation of the 8FNP whereas the macro cultivation of the factors conditions the mind to eventually leads to the arising of a mind with eight path factors resulting in cessation.
Are there any suttas you can point to, which explain what you're talking about here? This being the Discovering Theravada section, a Theravada source would be good.

Metta,
Paul. :)
The large scale take on it is quite self explanatory and there are countless Sutta dealing with this ie;
"And what, monks, is right view? Knowledge with regard to stress, knowledge with regard to the origination of stress, knowledge with regard to the stopping of stress, knowledge with regard to the way of practice leading to the stopping of stress: This, monks, is called right view.

"And what is right resolve? Being resolved on renunciation, on freedom from ill will, on harmlessness: This is called right resolve.

"And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, abstaining from divisive speech, abstaining from abusive speech, abstaining from idle chatter: This, monks, is called right speech.

"And what, monks, is right action? Abstaining from taking life, abstaining from stealing, abstaining from unchastity: This, monks, is called right action.

"And what, monks, is right livelihood? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones, having abandoned dishonest livelihood, keeps his life going with right livelihood: This, monks, is called right livelihood.

"And what, monks, is right effort? (i) There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the non-arising of evil, unskillful qualities that have not yet arisen. (ii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the abandonment of evil, unskillful qualities that have arisen. (iii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the arising of skillful qualities that have not yet arisen. (iv) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the maintenance, non-confusion, increase, plenitude, development, & culmination of skillful qualities that have arisen: This, monks, is called right effort.

"And what, monks, is right mindfulness? (i) There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, aware, & mindful — putting away greed & distress with reference to the world. (ii) He remains focused on feelings in & of themselves — ardent, aware, & mindful — putting away greed & distress with reference to the world. (iii) He remains focused on the mind in & of itself — ardent, aware, & mindful — putting away greed & distress with reference to the world. (iv) He remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, aware, & mindful — putting away greed & distress with reference to the world. This, monks, is called right mindfulness.

"And what, monks, is right concentration? (i) There is the case where a monk — quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful (mental) qualities — enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. (ii) With the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, he enters & remains in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of concentration, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. (iii) With the fading of rapture, he remains equanimous, mindful, & alert, and senses pleasure with the body. He enters & remains in the third jhana, of which the Noble Ones declare, 'Equanimous & mindful, he has a pleasant abiding.' (iv) With the abandoning of pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation & distress — he enters & remains in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity & mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. This, monks, is called right concentration."
Ven. Ananda said: "Friends, whoever — monk or nun — declares the attainment of arahantship in my presence, they all do it by means of one or another of four paths. Which four?

"There is the case where a monk has developed insight preceded by tranquillity. As he develops insight preceded by tranquillity, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it — his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed.

"Then there is the case where a monk has developed tranquillity preceded by insight. As he develops tranquillity preceded by insight, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it — his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed.

"Then there is the case where a monk has developed tranquillity in tandem with insight. As he develops tranquillity in tandem with insight, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it — his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed.
The what i refer to as small scale is explained in the Dhammasangani first book of the Abhidhamma describing the Good State endowed with Eight Path Factors ( i will just post the summary);
Thought engaged upon the Higher Ideal (lokuttarain cittam).
I. The First Path (pathamo maggo).*
Image
Path leads to cessation of the groups of feelings, perceptions, forms, consciousness and fabrications;
...And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of form, i.e., right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

....And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of feeling...

...From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of perception. And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of perception...

... And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of fabrications...

...And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of consciousness, i.e., right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

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rightviewftw
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Re: Eightfold path

Post by rightviewftw » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:56 pm

Here is an excerpt from the Manual of Insight;
The moment of path knowledge
...
How one understands suffering
Path knowledge experiences nibbāna, which is the cessation of all mental and physical phenomena (such as constantly arising and disappearing in-breath and out-breath or mindfulness). Due to this experience, one fully understands without confusion that all these phenomena (i.e., the in-breath and out-breath, mindfulness, dependent material phenomena, constantly arising and disappearing mental and physical phenomena, conditioned phenomena) are suffering and not peaceful.
Note that Nibbana here means extinguishing/cessation.

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by rightviewftw » Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:23 am

Another great sutta about the 8FNP
117. Mahācattārīsaka Sutta: The Great Forty
1. Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. There he addressed the bhikkhus thus: “Bhikkhus.”—“Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said this:
2. “Bhikkhus, I shall teach you noble right concentration with its supports and its requisites. Listen and attend closely to what I shall say.”—“Yes, venerable sir,” the bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:
3. “What, bhikkhus, is noble right concentration with its supports and its requisites, that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, and right mindfulness? Unification of mind equipped with these seven factors is called noble right concentration with its supports and its requisites.

(View)
4. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? One understands wrong view as wrong view and right view as right view: this is one’s right view.
5. “And what, bhikkhus, is wrong view? ‘There is nothing given, nothing offered, nothing sacrificed; no fruit or result of good and bad actions; no this world, no other world; no mother, no father; no beings who are reborn spontaneously; no [72] good and virtuous recluses and brahmins in the world who have realised for themselves by direct knowledge and declare this world and the other world.’ This is wrong view.
6. “And what, bhikkhus, is right view? Right view, I say, is twofold: there is right view that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions; and there is right view that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
7. “And what, bhikkhus, is right view that is affected by the taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions? ‘There is what is given and what is offered and what is sacrificed; there is fruit and result of good and bad actions; there is this world and the other world; there is mother and father; there are beings who are reborn spontaneously; there are in the world good and virtuous recluses and brahmins who have realised for themselves by direct knowledge and declare this world and the other world.’ This is right view affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions.
8. “And what, bhikkhus, is right view that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path? The wisdom, the faculty of wisdom, the power of wisdom, the investigation-of-states enlightenment factor, the path factor of right view in one whose mind is noble, whose mind is taintless, who possesses the noble path and is developing the noble path: this is right view that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
9. “One makes an effort to abandon wrong view and to enter upon right view: this is one’s right effort. Mindfully one abandons wrong view, mindfully one enters upon and abides in right view: this is one’s right mindfulness. Thus these three states run and circle around right view, that is, right view, right effort, and right mindfulness.

(Intention)
10. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? One understands wrong intention as wrong intention and right intention as right intention: this is one’s [73] right view.
11. “And what, bhikkhus, is wrong intention? The intention of sensual desire, the intention of ill will, and the intention of cruelty: this is wrong intention.
12. “And what, bhikkhus, is right intention? Right intention, I say, is twofold: there is right intention that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions, and there is right intention that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
13. “And what, bhikkhus, is right intention that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions? The intention of renunciation, the intention of non-ill will, and the intention of non-cruelty: this is right intention that is affected by taints … ripening in the acquisitions.
14. “And what, bhikkhus, is right intention that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path? The thinking, thought, intention, mental absorption, mental fixity, directing of mind, verbal formation in one whose mind is noble, whose mind is taintless, who possesses the noble path and is developing the noble path: this is right intention that is noble … a factor of the path.
15. “One makes an effort to abandon wrong intention and to enter upon right intention: this is one’s right effort. Mindfully one abandons wrong intention, mindfully one enters upon and abides in right intention: this is one’s right mindfulness. Thus these three states run and circle around right intention, that is, right view, right effort, and right mindfulness.

(Speech)
16. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? One understands wrong speech as wrong speech and right speech as right speech: this is one’s right view.
17. “And what, bhikkhus, is wrong speech? False speech, malicious speech, harsh speech, and gossip: this is wrong speech.
18. “And what, bhikkhus, is right speech? Right speech, I say, is twofold: there is right speech that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions; and there is [74] right speech that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
19. “And what, bhikkhus, is right speech that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions? Abstinence from false speech, abstinence from malicious speech, abstinence from harsh speech, abstinence from gossip: this is right speech that is affected by taints … ripening in the acquisitions.
20. “And what, bhikkhus, is right speech that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path? The desisting from the four kinds of verbal misconduct, the abstaining, refraining, abstinence from them in one whose mind is noble, whose mind is taintless, who possesses the noble path and is developing the noble path: this is right speech that is noble … a factor of the path.
21. “One makes an effort to abandon wrong speech and to enter upon right speech: this is one’s right effort. Mindfully one abandons wrong speech, mindfully one enters upon and abides in right speech: this is one’s right mindfulness. Thus these three states run and circle around right speech, that is, right view, right effort, and right mindfulness.

(Action)
22. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? One understands wrong action as wrong action and right action as right action: this is one’s right view.
23. “And what, bhikkhus, is wrong action? Killing living beings, taking what is not given, and misconduct in sensual pleasures: this is wrong action.
24. “And what, bhikkhus, is right action? Right action, I say, is twofold: there is right action that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions; and there is right action that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
25. “And what, bhikkhus, is right action that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions? Abstinence from killing living beings, abstinence from taking what is not given, abstinence from misconduct in sensual pleasures: this is right action that is affected by taints … ripening in the acquisitions.
26. “And what, bhikkhus, is right action that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path? The desisting from the three kinds of bodily misconduct, the abstaining, refraining, abstinence from them in one whose mind is noble, whose mind is taintless, who possesses the noble path and is developing the noble path: this is right action [75] that is noble … a factor of the path.
27. “One makes an effort to abandon wrong action and to enter upon right action: this is one’s right effort. Mindfully one abandons wrong action, mindfully one enters upon and dwells in right action: this is one’s right mindfulness. Thus these three states run and circle around right action, that is, right view, right effort, and right mindfulness.

(Livelihood)
28. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? One understands wrong livelihood as wrong livelihood and right livelihood as right livelihood: this is one’s right view.
29. “And what, bhikkhus, is wrong livelihood? Scheming, talking, hinting, belittling, pursuing gain with gain: this is wrong livelihood.
30. “And what, bhikkhus, is right livelihood? Right livelihood, I say, is twofold: there is right livelihood that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions; and there is right livelihood that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path.
31. “And what, bhikkhus, is right livelihood that is affected by taints, partaking of merit, ripening in the acquisitions? Here, bhikkhus, a noble disciple abandons wrong livelihood and gains his living by right livelihood: this is right livelihood that is affected by taints … ripening in the acquisitions.
32. “And what, bhikkhus, is right livelihood that is noble, taintless, supramundane, a factor of the path? The desisting from wrong livelihood, the abstaining, refraining, abstinence from it in one whose mind is noble, whose mind is taintless, who possesses the noble path and is developing the noble path: this is right livelihood that is noble … a factor of the path.
33. “One makes an effort to abandon wrong livelihood and to enter upon right livelihood: this is one’s right effort. Mindfully one abandons wrong livelihood, mindfully one enters upon and dwells in right livelihood: this is one’s right mindfulness. Thus these three states run and circle around right livelihood, that is, right view, right effort, and right mindfulness.

(The Great Forty)
34. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? [76] In one of right view, right intention comes into being; in one of right intention, right speech comes into being; in one of right speech, right action comes into being; in one of right action, right livelihood comes into being; in one of right livelihood, right effort comes into being; in one of right effort, right mindfulness comes into being; in one of right mindfulness, right concentration comes into being; in one of right concentration, right knowledge comes into being; in one of right knowledge, right deliverance comes into being. Thus, bhikkhus, the path of the disciple in higher training possesses eight factors, the arahant possesses ten factors.
35. “Therein, bhikkhus, right view comes first. And how does right view come first? In one of right view, wrong view is abolished, and the many evil unwholesome states that originate with wrong view as condition are also abolished, and the many wholesome states that originate with right view as condition come to fulfilment by development.
“In one of right intention, wrong intention is abolished, and the many evil unwholesome states that originate with wrong intention as condition are also abolished, and the many wholesome states that originate with right intention as condition come to fulfilment by development.
“In one of right speech, wrong speech is abolished … In one of right action, wrong action is abolished … In one of right livelihood, wrong livelihood is abolished [77] … In one of right effort, wrong effort is abolished … In one of right mindfulness, wrong mindfulness is abolished … In one of right concentration, wrong concentration is abolished … In one of right knowledge, wrong knowledge is abolished … In one of right deliverance, wrong deliverance is abolished, and the many evil unwholesome states that originate with wrong deliverance as condition are also abolished, and the many wholesome states that originate with right deliverance as condition come to fulfilment by development.
36. “Thus, bhikkhus, there are twenty factors on the side of the wholesome, and twenty factors on the side of the unwholesome. This Dhamma discourse on the Great Forty has been set rolling and cannot be stopped by any recluse or brahmin or god or Māra or Brahmā or anyone in the world.
37. “Bhikkhus, if any recluse or brahmin thinks that this Dhamma discourse on the Great Forty should be censured and rejected, then there are ten legitimate deductions from his assertions that would provide grounds for censuring him here and now. If that worthy one censures right view, then he would honour and praise those recluses and brahmins who are of wrong view. If that worthy one censures right intention, [78] then he would honour and praise those recluses and brahmins who are of wrong intention. If that worthy one censures right speech … right action … right livelihood … right effort … right mindfulness … right concentration … right knowledge … right deliverance, then he would honour and praise those recluses and brahmins who are of wrong deliverance. If any recluse or brahmin thinks that this Dhamma discourse on the Great Forty should be censured and rejected, then these are ten legitimate deductions from his assertions that would provide grounds for censuring him here and now.
38. “Bhikkhus, even those teachers from Okkala, Vassa and Bhañña, who held the doctrine of non-causality, the doctrine of non-doing, and the doctrine of nihilism, would not think that this Dhamma discourse on the Great Forty should be censured and rejected. Why is that? For fear of blame, attack, and confutation.”

That is what the Blessed One said. The bhikkhus were satisfied and delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

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Re: Eightfold path

Post by Nwad » Thu Nov 01, 2018 3:06 pm

First of all anger often (always?) Is directed toward peoples or living beings. When your mind is attached and directed to some expectations or suitable results. When you want something to be, but because of s0mething don't working or someone's job is of bad quality, your plans are damaged or destroyed. The attachment of the mind with the destruction of the plans causes suffering, and mind directs this suffering to the (supposed) origin of the destruction of plans and causes anger toward the origin.

What I can suggest you is to develop compassion. Peoples are not bad in their hearts, they don't want to make you anger or see you suffering, they just survive as they can. They are in suffering and don't aware of it. It very sad actually... You have to develop compassion to these living beings toward who you feel anger. They are just like you are, they have mother, father, family, childrens, friends, hobbies, they don't want to suffer... The real problem is not actually them, real problem is attachement of your mind to some mental projection. What you can try when you feel anger coming, is to find the root of attachement. Why it makes me feel anger? What is the projection that my mind is attached to? It is so important? Why iam greedy about it ? Do I really need it to feel happy? ...

PS if it's off topic please delete it

Metta

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