Santi and Api Santi in AN 4:199

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Sati1
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Santi and Api Santi in AN 4:199

Post by Sati1 » Wed Feb 17, 2016 9:46 pm

Hello,

Does anyone know what the origin of the word "santi" in the phrase "santi hoti" ("I may be" by Bhikkhu Bodhi) is? Similarly, where does "api ha santi" in "api ha santi hoti" ("May I be?") come from? "Santi" as 3rd person plural of "atthi", or as "peaceful", does not make much sense here. I would actually have expected the optative "assa" for "I may be".

Thank you,
Sati1
London, UK

----
"I do not perceive even one other thing, o monks, that when developed and cultivated entails such great happiness as the mind" (AN 1.10, transl. Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi)
"So this spiritual life, monks, does not have gain, honor, and renown for its benefit, or the attainment of moral discipline for its benefit, or the attainment of concentration for its benefit, or knowledge and vision for its benefit. But it is this unshakable liberation of mind that is the goal of this spiritual life, its heartwood, and its end," (MN 29, transl. Ven Bhikkhu Bodhi)

Sylvester
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Re: Santi and Api Santi in AN 4:199

Post by Sylvester » Fri Feb 19, 2016 5:26 am

You almost hit the nail on the head, with your suggestion of the optative assa. :clap:

As all the propositions preceding santi hoti are clearly being presented as quotations of the 18 variants of taṇhāvicarita (craving thoughts) with the enclitic iti (eg satasmī'ti hoti), santi should therefore be similarly parsed as san'ti.

This is probably another one of those horrible irregular verb occurences. The Comy parses santi hoti as -
Santi hotīti evamādīsu ahaṃ siyanti hotīti evamattho veditabbo
So, there you have the optative for as in the alternative form siya.

In the Agama parallel SA 984, the san'ti is rendered as 我當, which can be rendered as "I should". But it also suggests that the original Indic word could have been an optative, which in turn could have been a desiderative optative, instead of the imperative optative as translated. The choice of the Chinese word probably just represents a misunderstanding of the intent of the optative.

:anjali:

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Sati1
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Re: Santi and Api Santi in AN 4:199

Post by Sati1 » Sat Feb 20, 2016 8:08 am

Dear Sylvester,

Thank you very much for the reply. That "santi" stands for "siyan ti" clarifies the question. After reading your post, I looked up the commentary on the next phrase, "api ha santi", which says that "api nāma aham bhaveyyan ti evam patthanākappanavasena vuttani", in agreement wih Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation as "may I be", indicating a wish to become something.

I appreciate your reference to the commentary, since it provided me with a first opportunity to use one.

Best wishes,
Sati1
London, UK

----
"I do not perceive even one other thing, o monks, that when developed and cultivated entails such great happiness as the mind" (AN 1.10, transl. Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi)
"So this spiritual life, monks, does not have gain, honor, and renown for its benefit, or the attainment of moral discipline for its benefit, or the attainment of concentration for its benefit, or knowledge and vision for its benefit. But it is this unshakable liberation of mind that is the goal of this spiritual life, its heartwood, and its end," (MN 29, transl. Ven Bhikkhu Bodhi)

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