Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Explore the ancient language of the Tipitaka and Theravāda commentaries
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Mkoll
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Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Post by Mkoll »

The sutta below is SN 20.6.
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Regarding the second to last section, Ven Bodhi's note (sorry, no diacriticals):
Ayusankhara. Spk: This is said with reference to the physical life faculty (rupajivitindriya); for this presishes even faster than that. But it is not possible to describe the breakup of formless phenomena (i.e., of mental states, because according to the Abhidhamma they break up sixteen times faster than material phenomena).
What exactly is this "physical life faculty" that is said to perish so quickly?
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
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Volo
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Re: Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Post by Volo »

jīvitindriya-rūpa - a type of derived materiality (upādāya-rūpa), the vital force of kammaja-rūpa.
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DooDoot
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Re: Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Post by DooDoot »

Mkoll wrote: Thu Mar 26, 2020 3:51 amWhat exactly is this "physical life faculty" that is said to perish so quickly?
The sutta appears to be a metaphor; saying how life is so fleeting thus urgency for practise is required. It appears to be a maranasati. The speedstar arrow catcher also appears a metaphor for sati. As for 'ayusankhara', it appears to be merely the life-force, as mentioned in MN 43 & DN 16:
SN 20.6 wrote:āyusaṅkhārā khīyanti: waning of the life forces

khīyati
khī + ya
is exhausted; wastes away; becomes dejected.
MN 43 wrote:āyu parikkhīṇo: vitality is [totally] spent

parikkhīṇa
pp. of parikhīyati
wasted; exhausted.
MN 43 wrote:When someone dies, their physical, verbal and mental processes have ceased and stilled; their vitality is spent; their warmth is dissipated; and their faculties have disintegrated.

Yvāyaṃ, āvuso, mato kālaṅkato tassa kāyasaṅkhārā niruddhā paṭippassaddhā, vacīsaṅkhārā niruddhā paṭippassaddhā, cittasaṅkhārā niruddhā paṭippassaddhā, āyu parikkhīṇo, usmā vūpasantā, indriyāni paribhinnāni.

MN 43
DN 16 wrote:So at the Cāpāla tree shrine the Buddha, mindful and aware, surrendered the life force.

Atha kho bhagavā cāpāle cetiye sato sampajāno āyusaṅkhāraṃ ossaji.

DN 16
Sati (mindfulness, reflective awareness, recollection) is the quick awareness and recall of the things which must be recalled. It must be as quick as an arrow. We also can describe sati as a vehicle or transport mechanism of the fastest kind. This most rapid transport doesn't carry material things, it carries wisdom and knowledge. Sati delivers paññä (wisdom) in time to meet our needs. Through the practice of mindfulness with breathing, sati is trained fully.

Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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Mkoll
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Re: Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Post by Mkoll »

Thank you for your reply, DooDoot. That was my impression as well. I see it as metaphorical in the sense of "life flashing before your eyes" or "life is fleeting." I'm wondering if that's it...or if there is something deeper here....

Volo, thank you for your reply. Can you expand upon what you mean in language someone familiar with the suttas can understand? I am not versed in Abhidhamma.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
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Volo
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Re: Ayusankhara, rupajivitindriya

Post by Volo »

Mkoll wrote: Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:43 am Volo, thank you for your reply. Can you expand upon what you mean in language someone familiar with the suttas can understand? I am not versed in Abhidhamma.
I kind of also agree that it is a metaphor, Commentaries sometimes tend to interpret things too literally in Abhidhamma technical sense. I just thought that you want to understand VBB's endnote.

What (as I understand it) commentary (and VBB in his note) says is that: there are different types of materiality - 4 great elements (earth, water, etc) + 24 derived materiality (like color, sensitive element of the eye, etc). These types of materiality have different causes, which produce them, in particular kamma is one of such causes. Materiality, which is produced by kamma (called "kamma-ja", for example sensitive element of the eye is produced by kamma) is supported by jīvitindriya - again a type of materiality. All types of materiality appear and disappear very rapidly, jīvitindriya also.
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