Etymology of upekkha

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phil
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Etymology of upekkha

Post by phil » Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:54 pm

I read that the etymology of upekkha is something like "to climb up and look over." Google and Dhammawheel search didn't clarify, would somebody be able to confirm that?

Thanks.
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)

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Dmytro
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by Dmytro » Sun Oct 08, 2017 3:53 pm

Hi Phil,

It's rather 'looking on' (upa+ikkh).

See the topic:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=5939

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nibbedhika
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by nibbedhika » Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:06 pm

Corresponds to the Sanskrit utpreksha.

preksha means to be a spectator or to look on without interfering, while the prefix ud has the meanings of superiority or separation.

The root verb is the same - iksha/ikkha/to see - from which we get other Sanskrit words like anapeksha (to totally disregard.)

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Dmytro
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by Dmytro » Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:09 pm

Yes, in later Sanskrit reconstruction this word somehow obtained the connotations of superiority, condescendence and disregard.

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phil
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by phil » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:46 am

Dmytro wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:09 pm
Yes, in later Sanskrit reconstruction this word somehow obtained the connotations of superiority, condescendence and disregard.
Thanks for your feedback Dmytro and nibbedhika.

I suppose it is possible to have the idea of being in a higher position looking down with a kusala meaning, I think of the Dhammapada verse w/ looking down from heights on "fools", i forget the exact words. I'm just going to check my bilingual Dhammapada for the Pali to see the verb that is used.

no, it is, avekkhati, "see with the divine eye", though the English translation is observes.
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)

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Dmytro
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by Dmytro » Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:25 pm

Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit correspondence is "upekṣā", which is less distorted.

However it would be unnatural to draw etymology from a language that was created much later.

ToVincent
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Re: Etymology of upekkha

Post by ToVincent » Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:43 pm

Dmytro wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:25 pm
However it would be unnatural to draw etymology from a language that was created much later.
I am not going to argue on the fact that many great Pali scholars are disagreeing with you on that matter. Because they are usually adding as much nonsensical elucidations, than you.

I am just going to tell you one thing; and you'll infer from that.
What has been said in the Vedas 3000 years ago, is being said today - by a scholar of the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, for instance - the same exact way; with absolutely no distortion at all - intonation included.
We are all possessed - more or less.
------
And what, bhikkhu, is inward rottenness? Here someone is immoral, one of evil character, of impure and suspect behaviour, secretive in his acts, no ascetic though claiming to be one, not a celibate though claiming to be one, inwardly rotten, corrupt, depraved. This is called inward rottenness.”
SN 35.241
------
Just as a chunk of salt, cast in water, loses its form and keeps only its taste; so does one who deals with the deathless loses himself in that reality.
------
https://justpaste.it/j5o4

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