What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

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santa100
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by santa100 »

martinfrank wrote:Most hungry African children are probably more than ready to move to a first world nursing home, while very, very few inmates of first world nursing homes would be ready to move to a roadside in Africa and sleep below the floor of a small shop... not to speak of too little food, dirty water, constant threat of getting abused and/or killed... not to speak of neglect and loneliness beyond (obviously) your imagination.

You compare two things as unequal as dying of boredom and dying of hunger.
Well, if you see it that way, you can always try my original option with charitynavigator.org then.. :anjali:

PimonratC
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by PimonratC »

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:bow: :bow: :bow: ... Really Thank you for the good things in the world ...



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manas
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by manas »

Back when I was a younger man, I was once approached by a boy who looked to be about 11 years old. He asked me if I could give some money. I guess I was a bit naive at the time, and was sincerely taken aback, saying "don't you have anyone to take care of you?" to which he just shook his head. I have never forgotten how, looking at his outstretched hand, I noticed it was virtually blackened with dirt. I thought to myself, "can someone this young really just be living on the streets, and be neglected as much as this?" I gave him what I felt I could afford at the time, and went on my way. After I got onto my train, he seemed to want to ask me something else, as though my dismay at his situation made him feel cared for, just for a moment, but then the train left. I still think of him from time to time, and hope that he ended up being able to get a decent education, and a more stable life than what he was experiencing back then. I've never forgotten that outstretched hand, blacked with dirt and grime, and the look in his eyes attempting to hide his vulnerability behind a veneer of tough indifference.
"Isn't it amazing, friends! Isn't it astounding! — the extent to which mindfulness immersed in the body, when developed & pursued, is said by the Blessed One who knows, who sees — the worthy one, rightly self-awakened — to be of great fruit & great benefit." (Kayagata-sati Sutta, excerpt)

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Anagarika
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Anagarika »

martinfrank wrote:
SarathW wrote:Is that all we can do to a freezing child?

I saw this woman in the street sleeping with her three children. (Say age 6,5,3)
I gave her some money to by the lunch.

I asked my self:

Is that all I can do?
:thinking:
Image

We can watch "Buddha's Lost Children"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJcn8SRQNoM

and contribute to the Foundation which keeps them fed, clothed and cared for

http://waikhru.com/

Martin, it was very kind that you mentioned, www.waikhru.com, above. This is an effort that I started some years ago, and each year bring funds over to the Golden Horse Temple, and Khru Baa. This year, I had raised funds to provide Muay Thai gear for the children, which I delivered earlier this year, as well as to send funds to contribute to Khru Baa's medical expenses, after his (moderate) stroke this year. But, what I have done is a tiny, tiny drop in the bucket. I only wish there were more full fledged efforts to raise funds for his Wat. One approach is for people on Facebook to link to https://www.facebook.com/goldenhorsemonastery . The author of this Facebook page is connected with the Golden Horse Temple, and I believe is a relative of Khru Baa. I feel that if more people know of Khru Baa and his work rescuing children from the areas around Chiang Rai, Thailand, they'd want to help. The funding for feeding and caring for the children comes through daily dana, and an account set up through the regional Thai Sangha, along with other sources.

I've been to his Wat a number of times. It's an experience any visitor to Northern Thailand should experience. He's the real deal, and the other monks, nuns and the kids there are amazing. People from around the world visit to provide dana and to visit with Khru Baa and the Wat.

I didn't mean to toot my own horn...it's very nice that you found the site amidst the millions of websites out there. I've been lucky from my vocation to earn some excess funds beyond what is needed for a simple life, and try to give back a bit. Again, drops of water in the ocean. I'm crazy enough to hope that with time, I can do more to raise funds for issues of interest to me ( anti-sex trafficking in Thailand, medical equipment to the new Fang, Thailand hospital) through various projects.


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Modus.Ponens
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Modus.Ponens »

Anagarika wrote: Martin, it was very kind that you mentioned, http://www.waikhru.com, above. This is an effort that I started some years ago, and each year bring funds over to the Golden Horse Temple, and Khru Baa. This year, I had raised funds to provide Muay Thai gear for the children, which I delivered earlier this year, as well as to send funds to contribute to Khru Baa's medical expenses, after his (moderate) stroke this year. But, what I have done is a tiny, tiny drop in the bucket. I only wish there were more full fledged efforts to raise funds for his Wat. One approach is for people on Facebook to link to https://www.facebook.com/goldenhorsemonastery . The author of this Facebook page is connected with the Golden Horse Temple, and I believe is a relative of Khru Baa. I feel that if more people know of Khru Baa and his work rescuing children from the areas around Chiang Rai, Thailand, they'd want to help. The funding for feeding and caring for the children comes through daily dana, and an account set up through the regional Thai Sangha, along with other sources.

I've been to his Wat a number of times. It's an experience any visitor to Northern Thailand should experience. He's the real deal, and the other monks, nuns and the kids there are amazing. People from around the world visit to provide dana and to visit with Khru Baa and the Wat.

I didn't mean to toot my own horn...it's very nice that you found the site amidst the millions of websites out there. I've been lucky from my vocation to earn some excess funds beyond what is needed for a simple life, and try to give back a bit. Again, drops of water in the ocean. I'm crazy enough to hope that with time, I can do more to raise funds for issues of interest to me ( anti-sex trafficking in Thailand, medical equipment to the new Fang, Thailand hospital) through various projects.
"Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect your own generosity: 'It is a gain, a great gain for me, that — among people overcome with the stain of possessiveness — I live at home, my awareness cleansed of the stain of possessiveness, freely generous, openhanded, delighting in being magnanimous, responsive to requests, delighting in the distribution of alms.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting generosity, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on generosity. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

"Of one who does this, Mahanama, it is said: 'Among those who are out of tune, the disciple of the noble ones dwells in tune; among those who are malicious, he dwells without malice; having attained the stream of Dhamma, he develops the recollection of generosity.'


Muditta to you, Anagarika. :)

(Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (1)" (AN 11.12), translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html)
"He turns his mind away from those phenomena and, having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.' " - Jhana Sutta

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Anagarika
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Anagarika »

Modus.Ponens wrote:
Anagarika wrote:
"Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect your own generosity: 'It is a gain, a great gain for me, that — among people overcome with the stain of possessiveness — I live at home, my awareness cleansed of the stain of possessiveness, freely generous, openhanded, delighting in being magnanimous, responsive to requests, delighting in the distribution of alms.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting generosity, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on generosity. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

"Of one who does this, Mahanama, it is said: 'Among those who are out of tune, the disciple of the noble ones dwells in tune; among those who are malicious, he dwells without malice; having attained the stream of Dhamma, he develops the recollection of generosity.'


Muditta to you, Anagarika. :)

(Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (1)" (AN 11.12), translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html)
Modus Ponens, thanks for this. I am guessing that you, in your way, express a generosity that is profound, as well. I'm always mindful of people like Bhikkhu Bodhi, who started Buddhist Global Relief. I have friends in Thailand that procure funds for warm clothing in the colder months, and drive around the hill tribes distributing "warms" to the Hill Tribe children and families. I think of the Chiang Mai Rotary that brings opthamologists to the villages and delivers eyeglasses to parents and kids that could not see well without their new glasses. I think of Steve who runs a wonderful cafe in Chiang Mai, that goes with his biker buddies to a school for autistic kids and cleans, brings food and teaches during the day on various weekends.

As Bhikkhu Bodhi has said, we bring to the practice our own interests and aptitudes. He decided to get off the cushion and out of the library, and make a substantive difference. I wai deeply to all who engage in the many ways that help can be brought to others. To any that read our posts...nudge, nudge, wink, wink :) ...https://www.buddhistglobalrelief.org/ac ... nation.php


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Modus.Ponens
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Modus.Ponens »

Actualy, Anagarika, I was just so inspired when I first read your post that I wanted to thank you for your noble work and compliment you. It's wonderful to see many people in this forum making a real difference in this world in the ways the Buddha would praise.

:smile: :anjali:
"He turns his mind away from those phenomena and, having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.' " - Jhana Sutta

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Anagarika
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Anagarika »

Modus.Ponens wrote:Actualy, Anagarika, I was just so inspired when I first read your post that I wanted to thank you for your noble work and compliment you. It's wonderful to see many people in this forum making a real difference in this world in the ways the Buddha would praise.

:smile: :anjali:
I will be honest, Modus Ponens, and say that these things that I do are from a completely selfish point of view. I just find it enormously satisfying to be of some help to others. I am fortunate that I can earn slightly more than I need for basic needs, and can use these excess funds to help others, and in almost every case, I am only standing on the shoulders of giants, like Bhikhu Bodhi. None of us can remedy global hunger on our own, but we can perform dana, large or small, to assist BGR, for example. It was Khru Baa that developed his Golden Horse Temple, and doing small things to help him, like so many do, is incredibly satisfying. What makes it so satisfying in many ways, for example, is being at the Golden Horse Temple, and being amidst others from around the world that are inspired by his work and are helping him. The sense of sangha, and community, is awesome.

Does dana gladden the heart and mind? I am sure that it does, and again, what I do is a drop of water in the ocean. There are many others that make a real impact. I read an article yesterday about Sam Simon http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/5 ... to-charity and just feel that we all can do our part, large or small, to participate in this dana. It is just a very good and selfish act. :)

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Modus.Ponens
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Modus.Ponens »

Everybody acts good because it feels good, or because doing the right thing feels good, or because being seen doing good feels good. Whatever the reason we have to do good, it's always in our interest. But that's a wonderful part of how the world works, imo. The fact that doing good is agreeable to our minds, and doing evil is disagreeable to our minds, is an excelent coincidence of the laws of nature and mind. So we can be selfish by being altruistic. A curious paradox to people who are not aware of this. It's because we do not fully distinguish selfishness from our interest.

So I guess the compliment was also to your wisdom. ;)
"He turns his mind away from those phenomena and, having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.' " - Jhana Sutta

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Vanda
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by Vanda »

I would call John Quinones.
“Don’t go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, ‘This contemplative is our teacher.’ When you know for yourselves that, ‘These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted and carried out, lead to welfare and to happiness’ — then you should enter and remain in them.”
- Kalama Sutta, Anguttara Nikaya

dagon
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by dagon »

I was that child (well sort of) many years ago.

Having left home in a bad situation I found myself tired, broke, hungry and hitching a ride in the evening of a cold English day. A car pulled up and the man said that he could give me a lift as far as the next major service area. By the time we got there he had decided to buy me a meal, gave me the use of his couch for the night. In the morning he dropped me back to the motorway and gave me a small amount of cash.

I asked him for his address so that I would be able to repay him. He replied that I did not need to do this as he was repaying a debt that he had incurred many years before and the donor had said to him that if he wished to repay he should help some else if he was in a position to do so. :anjali:

24 hours later I had a job and accommodation and was able to eat until my first pay. I often remember the kindness and generosity I was shown. The gift that man gave me was far more than material assistance he gave. I remember the actions of that man every time I am fortunate enough to be able to help some one.

If the recipient asks to repay I say that you do not need to do this as I am repaying a debt that I had incurred many years before and the donor had said to me that if he wished to repay I should help some else if he was in a position to do so. I have been trying to repay that debt every since. The problem is that when ever I give my debt to the man increase as it helps my development. :thanks:


metta

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samseva
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Re: What would you do if you saw a freezing child?

Post by samseva »

dagon wrote:I was that child (well sort of) many years ago.

Having left home in a bad situation I found myself tired, broke, hungry and hitching a ride in the evening of a cold English day. A car pulled up and the man said that he could give me a lift as far as the next major service area. By the time we got there he had decided to buy me a meal, gave me the use of his couch for the night. In the morning he dropped me back to the motorway and gave me a small amount of cash.

I asked him for his address so that I would be able to repay him. He replied that I did not need to do this as he was repaying a debt that he had incurred many years before and the donor had said to him that if he wished to repay he should help some else if he was in a position to do so. :anjali:
Beautiful story, dagon. :smile:

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