Nibbana

A forum for members who wish to develop a deeper understanding of the Pali Canon and associated Commentaries, which for discussion purposes are both treated as authoritative.

Moderator: Mahavihara moderator

Post Reply
User avatar
one_awakening
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:04 am

Nibbana

Post by one_awakening » Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:37 am

When one lets go of an object, the object disappears, ceases. If it remains one hasn’t let go. Through letting go of all knowing, knowing ceases. This is the cessation of everything, including the mind. This is the place where consciousness no longer manifests, where earth, water, fire and air find no footing, where name and-form are wholly destroyed. Emptiness. Cessation. Nibbana .

Ajahn Brahmavamso
“You only lose what you cling to”

rightviewftw
Posts: 2219
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:50 pm

Re: Nibbana

Post by rightviewftw » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:10 am

i would not use the words "lets go" because the question arises "who or what is letting go"?
Rather i would say that discernment faculty culminates and all comes to an end. If one was to put it like that one is basically quoting the Sutta:)
Vinnana anidassanam,
boundless, illuminous all-around
How to meditate: Anapanasati, Satipatthana.
Intro to General Semantics
Factors & Perceptions

Parallel Dhammapada Reading
Chinese to Eng Dhp
"The statements; 'With the remainderless stopping & fading of the six contact-media is it the case that there is anything else?' '.. is it the case that there is not anything else .. is it the case that there both is & is not anything else .. is it the case that there neither is nor is not anything else?' objectify non-objectification. However far the six contact-media go, that is how far objectification goes."

User avatar
DooDoot
Posts: 3232
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:06 pm

Re: Nibbana

Post by DooDoot » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:24 am

Ajahn Brahmavamso seems to be promoting the unattainable; i.e., the cessation of sense experience.
Monks, among things conditioned and unconditioned, dispassion is reckoned to be the best of them all: the crushing of all infatuation, the removal of thirst, the uprooting of attachment, the cutting off of the round, the destruction of craving, dispassion, Nibbāna. Those who have faith in the Dhamma of dispassion have faith in the best; and for those who have faith in the best, the best result will be theirs.

https://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh155_Nyanap ... I.html#S48
When a bhikkhu has heard that nothing is worth adhering to, he directly knows everything; having directly known everything, he fully understands everything; having directly known everything, he fully understood everything, whatever feeling he feels, whether pleasant or painful or neither pleasant or painful, he abides contemplating (observing) impermanence in those feelings, contemplating (observing) fading away, contemplating (observing) cessation, contemplating (observing) relinquishment (letting go). Contemplating (observing) thus, he does not cling (think about) to anything in the world. When he does not cling (think about), he is not agitated, he personally attains Nibbana. He understands: ‘Birth is destroyed, the holy life has been lived, there is no more coming to any state of being.’ Briefly, it is in this way, a bhikkhu is liberated in the destruction of craving, one who has reached the ultimate end, the ultimate security from bondage, the ultimate holy life, the ultimate goal, one who is foremost among gods and humans.

https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books9/Bhik ... _Sutta.htm
Based on AB's description, whatever Nibbana is attained, it appears it is temporary (because when a sense object appears, Nibbana ceases, according to AB's definition). Since the Buddha is: "the one who knows", it seems the idea of "all knowing ceases" is not related to Buddhism but is another ideology. For Ajahn Brahm, it appears "knowing & seeing" (ñāṇadassana) does not occur to a Buddha.
So long, bhikkhus, as my knowledge and vision (ñāṇadassanaṃ) of these Four Noble Truths as they really are in their three phases and twelve aspects was not thoroughly purified in this way, I did not claim to have awakened to the unsurpassed perfect enlightenment in this world with its devas, Mara, and Brahma, in this generation with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans. But when my knowledge and vision of these Four Noble Truths as they really are in their three phases and twelve aspects was thoroughly purified in this way, then I claimed to have awakened to the unsurpassed perfect enlightenment in this world with its devas, Mara, and Brahma, in this generation with its ascetics and brahmins, its devas and humans. The knowledge and vision arose in me: ‘Unshakable is the liberation of my mind. This is my last birth. Now there is no more renewed existence.’

https://suttacentral.net/sn56.11/en/bodhi

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests