Buddhism and psychology unconscious

Discussion of Abhidhamma and related Commentaries
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form
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Buddhism and psychology unconscious

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http://dharmawisdom.org/blogs/psycholog ... nconscious

Professor William Waldron wrote a fantastic book called, "The Buddhist Unconscious". According to Waldron, Buddhist psychology espouses several competing topological theories of mind all of which include some form of an unconscious. The Abhidharmic model conceptualizes the unconscious as bhavanga-citta, a ground consciousness that is conditioned by karma and acts as a conditioning factor for current life habitual tendencies. Later revisions of that model view the unconscious as ālaya-vijñāna, a store consciousness containing the individual’s karmic seeds of suffering. Like Freud’s unconscious, bhavanga-citta and ālaya-vijñāna are thought to motivate the mind to produce destructive habitual mind states. However, Buddhist psychology has no concept of active repression, which would force these seeds to remain in the unconscious. Instead, birth itself is the proximate cause for the existence of bhavanga-citta and ālaya-vijñāna’s karmic contents.

Question: Does that pali term mentioned equate to unconscious in psychology?

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DooDoot
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Re: Buddhism and psychology unconscious

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form wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:24 am
However, Buddhist psychology has no concept of active repression, which would force these seeds to remain in the unconscious.
119. It may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evil-doer sees (the painful results of) his evil deeds.

121. Think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills himself with evil.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .budd.html
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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form
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Re: Buddhism and psychology unconscious

Post by form »

DooDoot wrote:
Thu Mar 05, 2020 2:03 am
form wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:24 am
However, Buddhist psychology has no concept of active repression, which would force these seeds to remain in the unconscious.
119. It may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evil-doer sees (the painful results of) his evil deeds.

121. Think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills himself with evil.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .budd.html
I also have the same thinking as u when I read the above.

justindesilva
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Re: Buddhism and psychology unconscious

Post by justindesilva »

form wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:24 am
http://dharmawisdom.org/blogs/psycholog ... nconscious

Professor William Waldron wrote a fantastic book called, "The Buddhist Unconscious". According to Waldron, Buddhist psychology espouses several competing topological theories of mind all of which include some form of an unconscious. The Abhidharmic model conceptualizes the unconscious as bhavanga-citta, a ground consciousness that is conditioned by karma and acts as a conditioning factor for current life habitual tendencies. Later revisions of that model view the unconscious as ālaya-vijñāna, a store consciousness containing the individual’s karmic seeds of suffering. Like Freud’s unconscious, bhavanga-citta and ālaya-vijñāna are thought to motivate the mind to produce destructive habitual mind states. However, Buddhist psychology has no concept of active repression, which would force these seeds to remain in the unconscious. Instead, birth itself is the proximate cause for the existence of bhavanga-citta and ālaya-vijñāna’s karmic contents.

Question: Does that pali term mentioned equate to unconscious in psychology?
Please correct me if wrong. Unconscious really mean as a term avingnana. Unconscious in fact clinically means not aware of the surrounding effects. Avingnana can arise only with an arhant , I believe .
Bhavanga citta can be active with a person clinically unconscious only. But it does not mean avingnana.

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