Dispeller of Delusion; Chapt. 16, Classification of Knowledge

Discussion of Abhidhamma and related Commentaries

Moderator: Mahavihara moderator

Post Reply
User avatar
JeffR
Posts: 240
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2009 3:54 am
Location: Minnesota, USA

Dispeller of Delusion; Chapt. 16, Classification of Knowledge

Post by JeffR » Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:58 am

I'm looking for some clarification/explanation. In the titled book and chapter, under 'Tetrads' §2091:
Herein, the three kinds of bodily bad conduct, the four kinds of verbal bad conduct and the three kinds of mental bad conduct are not called one's kamma. The ten kinds of good conduct in the three doors is called one's own (saka) kamma. Whether it is of oneself (attana) or of another, all unprofitable is not called one's own (saka) kamma. Why not? Because it destroys benefit (attha) and promotes harm. Whether it is of oneself or of another, all profitable is called one's own. Why? Because it destroys harm and promotes good.
I'm a little flummoxed here; we are all owners of our kamma, heir to our kamma, etc. So how is it that unprofitable is not called one's own, while profitable is called one's own?
What am I missing?
Is it because in purifying oneself that which destroys benefit and promotes harm is left behind, while that which destroys harm and promotes good maintains the purification process? Something on this order?

Thanks,
Therein what are 'six (types of) disrespect'? One dwells without respect, without deference for the Teacher; one dwells without respect, without deference for the Teaching; one dwells without respect, without deference for the Order; one dwells without respect, without deference for the precepts; one dwells without respect, without deference for heedfulness; one dwells without respect, without deference for hospitality. These are six (types of) disrespect.
:Vibh 945

User avatar
Dhammanando
Posts: 3774
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:44 pm
Location: Ban Sri Pradu Cremation Ground, Phrao District, Chiangmai

Re: Dispeller of Delusion; Chapt. 16, Classification of Knowledge

Post by Dhammanando » Thu Feb 02, 2017 11:11 am

In Sutta usage, the terms attano kammaṃ (“one’s action”), sakakammaṃ (“one’s own action”) and attanā kataṃ kammaṃ (“action done by oneself”) are synonymous and one will indeed find them applied to wholesome and unwholesome actions alike.

In the commentaries, however, in some contexts the word saka has a connotation that is not adequately conveyed by the usual translation “one’s own”. The connotation is that the thing in question is not only one’s own but that it is suitable and fitting for oneself. Unwholesome actions, inasmuch as they obstruct flourishing, conduce to pain, etc., are not “fitting for oneself” (saka) even though they may be “one’s own” (attano). [*]

Let me therefore propose an alternative translation to Ñāṇamoli’s:

  • Herein, the three kinds of bodily bad conduct, the four kinds of verbal bad conduct and the three kinds of mental bad conduct are not called ‘kamma appropriate for oneself’. The ten kinds of good conduct in the three doors is called ‘kamma appropriate for oneself’. Whether it is [done] by oneself (attanā) or by another, all unprofitable [kamma] is not called ‘kamma appropriate for onself’. Why not? Because it destroys benefit (attha) and promotes harm. Whether it is [done] by oneself or by another, all profitable [kamma] is called ‘kamma appropriate for onself’. Why? Because it destroys harm and promotes good.

_______________________________

[*] The commentarial use of saka might be profitably compared with that of the Latin proprius, which etymologically is the source not only of ‘property’ (i.e., that which one owns), but also of ‘proper’ (i.e., correct and suitable).

User avatar
JeffR
Posts: 240
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2009 3:54 am
Location: Minnesota, USA

Re: Dispeller of Delusion; Chapt. 16, Classification of Knowledge

Post by JeffR » Thu Feb 02, 2017 7:22 pm

:anjali: Thank you Bhante.

Again it comes down to the translation/interpretation. Another example why it is good to understand the pali to the best of ones ability. Although I'm gaining a grasp of some words, that part is a struggle for me as I have never learned a second language and am progressing in my time in this existence. I still do my best while keeping the priority of my time focused more on studying the teaching rather than learning the language.
Therein what are 'six (types of) disrespect'? One dwells without respect, without deference for the Teacher; one dwells without respect, without deference for the Teaching; one dwells without respect, without deference for the Order; one dwells without respect, without deference for the precepts; one dwells without respect, without deference for heedfulness; one dwells without respect, without deference for hospitality. These are six (types of) disrespect.
:Vibh 945

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests