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Similarities

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:05 am
by oceanmen
what does theravada and mahayana and zen have in common?
whats the common ground?

mainly trying to know the "common ground" and similarities....

thanks

metta

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:10 am
by tiltbillings
try this: http://www.abuddhistlibrary.com/Buddhis ... hayana.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:25 am
by oceanmen
thank you

metta

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:20 am
by Kim OHara
There's a wikipedia article on exactly this question - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_Poin ... e_Mahāyāna
It includes Rahula's statement plus background and extensions.
I forgot what it was called but googling "unifying Mahayana Theravada" found it along with some 13 000 more results. Enjoy!
:namaste:
Kim

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:07 am
by oceanmen
thank you for the wikepedia link
just trying to achieve non-duality by seeing oneness
not sure i making any sense but trying to

lots of metta
:namaste:

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 9:41 am
by Moggalana
You might also enjoy Ajahn Brahm's Which yana? Hahayana!.

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:09 am
by Dan74
oceanmen wrote:thank you for the wikepedia link
just trying to achieve non-duality by seeing oneness
not sure i making any sense but trying to

lots of metta
:namaste:
Anyone can talk the talk, but it takes some serious practice time to learn to walk the walk.

Re: Similarities

Posted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:51 pm
by Monkey Mind
Moggalana wrote:You might also enjoy Ajahn Brahm's Which yana? Hahayana!.
I second that recommendation. This talk really helped me to sort out some of this stuff, especially some of the "inadvertent" ant-Theravada sentiments of my Mahayana peers.

Re: Similarities

Posted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:45 am
by oceanmen
thank you tiltbilings...
:namaste:


The World Buddhist Sangha Council was first convened by Theravadins in Sri Lanka in 1966 with the hope of bridging differences and working together. The first convention was attended by leading monks, from many countries and sects, Mahaayaana as well as Theravaada.
(Contributed by Stephen Evans) The following, written by Ven. Walpola Rahula was approved unanimously.


Basic Points Unifying The Theravaada and the Mahaayaana

1. The Buddha is our only Master.

2. We take refuge in the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha.

3. We do not believe that this world is created and ruled by a God.

4. Following the example of the Buddha, who is the embodiment of Great Compassion (mahaa-karu.naa) and Great Wisdom (mahaa- praj~naa), we consider that the purpose of life is to develop compassion for all living beings without discrimination and to work for their good, happiness, and peace; and to develop wisdom leading to the realization of Ultimate Truth.

5. We accept the Four Noble Truths, nameley Dukkha, the Arising of Dukkha, the Cessation of Dukkha, and the Path leading to the Cessation of Dukkha; and the universal law of cause and effect as taught in the pratiitya-samutpaada (Conditioned Genesis or Dependent Origination).

6. We understand, according to the teaching of the Buddha, that all conditioned things (sa.mskaara) are impermanent (anitya) and dukkha, and that all conditioned and unconditioned things (dharma) are without self (anaatma).

7. We accept the Thirty-seven Qualities conducive to Enlightenment (bodhipak.sa-dharma) as different aspects of the Path taught by the Buddha leading to Enlightenment.

8. There are three ways of attaining bodhi or Enlightenment, according to the ability and capacity of each individual: namely as a disciple (sraavaka), as a Pratyeka-Buddha and as a Samyak-sam-Buddha (perfectly and Fully Enlightened Buddha). We accept it as the highest, noblest, and most heroic to follow the career of a Bodhisattva and to become a Samyak-sam-Buddha in order to save others.

9. We admit that in different countries there are differences with regard to the life of Buddhist monks, popular Buddhist beliefs and practices, rites and ceremonies, customs and habits. These external forms and expressions should not be confused with the essential teachings of the Buddha.

Source: Walpola Rahula; The Heritage of the Bhikkhu; (New York, Grove Press, 1974); pp. 100, 1137-138.

Re: Similarities

Posted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:51 pm
by ground
oceanmen wrote:thank you tiltbilings...
:namaste:


The World Buddhist Sangha Council was first convened by Theravadins in Sri Lanka in 1966 with the hope of bridging differences and working together. The first convention was attended by leading monks, from many countries and sects, Mahaayaana as well as Theravaada.
(Contributed by Stephen Evans) The following, written by Ven. Walpola Rahula was approved unanimously.


Basic Points Unifying The Theravaada and the Mahaayaana

...
...
This is certainly a masterpiece of political correctness ;)