How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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char101
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How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by char101 » Mon Dec 09, 2019 10:18 am

Hi,

How is meditation practiced in other Buddhist sects? What I know a little is that Tantrayana uses visualization and mantras and Mahayana also has some mantras (namo amitofu, is reciting this practiced as meditation?). Other than that do they practice meditation like practiced in the Theravada tradition (anapanasati, maybe other 40 objects of meditation). Do they uses the teachings in the Visuddhi Magga or the Satipatthana Sutta heavily?

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Dhammanando
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by Dhammanando » Mon Dec 09, 2019 11:02 am

char101 wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 10:18 am
How is meditation practiced in other Buddhist sects?
It's too diverse to really generalize about. To pursue the question you'd need to take it one school at a time.
char101 wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 10:18 am
Do they uses the teachings in the Visuddhi Magga or the Satipatthana Sutta heavily?
Not the Visuddhimagga, for they have their own meditation manuals based on the ideas peculiar to each school. For example, Kamalaśīla's Bhāvanākrama and Atiśa's Bodhipathapradīpa for the Tibetan schools; Koan collections like the Blue Cliff Record and Gateless Gate for the Ch'an school; the Sukhāvatīvyūha and Amitābha Sūtras for the Pure Land schools, etc., etc.

I think Thich Nhat Hanh makes use of the Chinese translation of a non-Theravadin version of the Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta, but I haven't heard of anyone else doing so.
“Keep to your own pastures, bhikkhus, walk in the haunts where your fathers roamed.
If ye thus walk in them, Māra will find no lodgement, Māra will find no foothold.”
— Cakkavattisīhanāda Sutta

Dan74
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by Dan74 » Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:25 pm

The meetings and retreats I've attended (mostly Zen/Chan/Seon, but a couple of Tibetan and Theravada) have, with only a few exceptions, included breath awareness meditation. So either counting breaths, concentrating on the entry ans exit of the breath (under the nose) or the movement of the breath through the body. The other less common techniques were body scanning and "just sitting" (with Soto Zen groups). The latter is very easily misunderstood and much has been written to explain it.
_/|\_

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Aloka
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by Aloka » Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:37 pm

The Tibetan Buddhist groups I used to attend had Samatha and Vipassana meditation classes. Deity visualisations with mantra recitation were a different practice.


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DNS
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by DNS » Mon Dec 09, 2019 5:05 pm

Tibetan Buddhism has tonglen meditation which is very similar to Theravada metta meditation. Tibetan Buddhism, Zen/Chan, and other meditative traditions all use breath meditation.

Just my opinion, but I think Zen/Chan have the most similar meditation practices to Theravada. They do breath meditation, walking meditation and much of the programs are centered on meditation (as opposed to mantras, chanting, or other practices).

char101
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by char101 » Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:09 am

Thank you for the sharing of knowledge. Meditation is the foundation of Buddhist practice, so I think whatever the view taken, as long as the path is right, the destination should be right either.
"Just as if a hen had eight, ten, or twelve eggs that she covered rightly, warmed rightly, & incubated rightly: Even though this wish did not occur to her — 'O that my chicks might break through the egg shells with their spiked claws or beaks and hatch out safely!' — still it is possible that the chicks would break through the shells with their spiked claws or beaks and hatch out safely. In the same way, when a disciple of the noble ones is consummate in virtue in this way, guards the doors to his sense faculties in this way, knows moderation in eating in this way, is devoted to wakefulness in this way, is endowed with seven qualities in this way, and obtains at will — without trouble or difficulty — the four jhanas that constitute heightened awareness and a pleasant abiding in the here-&-now in this way, then he is called a disciple of the noble ones who follows the practice for one in training, whose eggs are unspoiled, who is capable of breaking out, capable of awakening, capable of attaining the supreme rest from the yoke.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

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Kim OHara
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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by Kim OHara » Tue Dec 10, 2019 11:26 am

Dan74 wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:25 pm
The meetings and retreats I've attended (mostly Zen/Chan/Seon, but a couple of Tibetan and Theravada) have, with only a few exceptions, included breath awareness meditation. So either counting breaths, concentrating on the entry ans exit of the breath (under the nose) or the movement of the breath through the body. The other less common techniques were body scanning and "just sitting" (with Soto Zen groups). The latter is very easily misunderstood and much has been written to explain it.
The introductory Tibetan classes I attended focused on breath awareness, varied by body scanning and occasional walking meditation.

:coffee:
Kim

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Re: How is meditation practiced in other Buddhism sects?

Post by befriend » Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:14 pm

The Dalai Lama does analytical meditation as part of his practice to uproot the false sense of an independent self. The meditation is thinking about how everything is dependently arisen and based on thought and how everything is made up of parts. This is not very different than theravadan analyzing the elements thinking breath is no different than the wind etc... All schools agree that the practices should result in non clinging to anything.
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.

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