Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Manopubbangama
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Manopubbangama » Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:17 pm

SavakaNik wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:50 pm

Arthur Koestler
Darkness at noon :thumbsup:

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Bundokji
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Bundokji » Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:30 pm

Generally i like philosophers due to their peculiar personalities more than their philosophies!

Diogenes: Because he is mad. He used to masturbate in public to challenge people's beliefs
Seneca: Because of the way he died. No resistance and complete acceptance. This also applies to Socrates.
Hume: i find the last days of his life to be inspiring especially his exchange with James Boswell who tried to test his disbelief in God on his death bed. In his funeral, one man remarked "he was an atheist" in which another replied "no matter, he was an honest man".
Michel de Montaigne: In his essays, he wrote about his penis, farting and his strange habits of eating. Topics usually hidden from public discourse under the veil of "civility"
Schopenhauer: i particularly like this strange story
Whenever Schopenhauer would go out to eat he would take a gold coin and set it on the table. At the end of the meal he would take the coin and put it back in his pocket.

This went on for years before someone finally asked him why he did it. Schopenhauer responded that it was a silent wager. If he could get through his meal without hearing anything about women, sports, or politics he’d leave the coin as a tip for the waitress. Since most men speak of petty things he never had to pay out.
Kierkegaard: The disorder in his funeral which greatly embarrassed his brother Peter who was a Bishop and who long delayed placing a permanent tomb stone to mark the grave. This was a fitting end for someone who valued authenticity in the world we live in

Wittgenstein: His melancholy temperament especially his encounter with Karl Popper
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

SavakaNik
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by SavakaNik » Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:46 pm

Manopubbangama wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:17 pm
SavakaNik wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:50 pm

Arthur Koestler
Darkness at noon :thumbsup:
I'll have to check that one out! I've read Ghost in the Machine which was my introduction to him, I loved it, and I also have read parts of 'The Yogi and the Commissar'.

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Idappaccayata
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Idappaccayata » Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:45 pm

Alan Watts
A dying man can only rely upon his wisdom, if he developed it. Wisdom is not dependent upon any phenomenon originated upon six senses. It is developed on the basis of the discernment of the same. That’s why when one’s senses start to wither and die, the knowledge of their nature remains unaffected. When there is no wisdom, there will be despair, in the face of death.

- Ajahn Nyanamoli Thero

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SDC
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by SDC » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:22 pm

Idappaccayata wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:45 pm
Alan Watts
:thumbsup:

Dude was a pivotal influence leading up to my time with Buddhism.

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Idappaccayata
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Idappaccayata » Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:26 am

SDC wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:22 pm
Idappaccayata wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:45 pm
Alan Watts
:thumbsup:

Dude was a pivotal influence leading up to my time with Buddhism.
Same here. I really don't agree rationally with most of what he says now, but soldering m discovering him early on had a huge impact on my life
A dying man can only rely upon his wisdom, if he developed it. Wisdom is not dependent upon any phenomenon originated upon six senses. It is developed on the basis of the discernment of the same. That’s why when one’s senses start to wither and die, the knowledge of their nature remains unaffected. When there is no wisdom, there will be despair, in the face of death.

- Ajahn Nyanamoli Thero

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Mkoll
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Mkoll » Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:04 am

Zhuangzi.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

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samseva
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by samseva » Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:57 pm

Dhammanando wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:56 am
I expect that Chrysippus of Soli, the great systematizer of Stoicism, would be my favourite if any of his 700 books had survived. Unfortunately they’re all lost, so I have to make do with Epictetus and his teacher, Musonius Rufus.

Cora Lutz, Musonius Rufus: The Roman Socrates
Do you know how all of his works perished (they were all in one place and were destroyed by a natural disaster, for example)? Or they were maybe scattered in different places and it could be possible that some of his works turn up in the future?

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Dhammanando
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Dhammanando » Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:48 pm

samseva wrote:
Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:57 pm
Do you know how all of his works perished (they were all in one place and were destroyed by a natural disaster, for example)? Or they were maybe scattered in different places and it could be possible that some of his works turn up in the future?
I don't know how it happened.
“Keep to your own pastures, bhikkhus, walk in the haunts where your fathers roamed.
If ye thus walk in them, Māra will find no lodgement, Māra will find no foothold.”
— Cakkavattisīhanāda Sutta

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JamesTheGiant
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by JamesTheGiant » Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:12 am

Bundokji wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:30 pm
Wittgenstein...
In WW1 he would volunteer for duty in forward observation posts, forward of the trenches, and he'd write philosophy in a hole up there. Amazingly he survived this.

denise
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by denise » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:14 am

Bukowski

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Bundokji
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Bundokji » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:00 am

JamesTheGiant wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:12 am
In WW1 he would volunteer for duty in forward observation posts, forward of the trenches, and he'd write philosophy in a hole up there. Amazingly he survived this.
I remember he explained his rationale of joining the Austrian army as:

"Only if i can face death in the eye, i can become a decent human being."

Which is to a large extent, true. He is the most eccentric of all of them :heart:
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

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Kim OHara
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Kim OHara » Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:39 am

Bundokji wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:30 pm
Generally i like philosophers due to their peculiar personalities more than their philosophies!
...

Wittgenstein: His melancholy temperament especially his encounter with Karl Popper
Wikipedia wrote:Wittgenstein's Poker: The Story of a Ten-Minute Argument Between Two Great Philosophers is a 2001 book by BBC journalists David Edmonds and John Eidinow about events in the history of philosophy involving Sir Karl Popper and Ludwig Wittgenstein, leading to a confrontation at the Cambridge University Moral Sciences Club in 1946. The book was a bestseller and received positive reviews.[1][2]
:reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wittgenstein%27s_Poker

I came across it last year and it held my interest long enough that I finished it, although I'm not madly interested in philosophy of this period.

:coffee:
Kim

chownah
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by chownah » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:08 pm

Bundokji wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:00 am
JamesTheGiant wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:12 am
In WW1 he would volunteer for duty in forward observation posts, forward of the trenches, and he'd write philosophy in a hole up there. Amazingly he survived this.
I remember he explained his rationale of joining the Austrian army as:

"Only if i can face death in the eye, i can become a decent human being."
So, he went and faced death in the eye......did it work?
chownah

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Manopubbangama
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Re: Who are your favourite non-Buddhist philosophers?

Post by Manopubbangama » Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:43 pm

Bundokji wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:00 am
JamesTheGiant wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:12 am
In WW1 he would volunteer for duty in forward observation posts, forward of the trenches, and he'd write philosophy in a hole up there. Amazingly he survived this.
I remember he explained his rationale of joining the Austrian army as:

"Only if i can face death in the eye, i can become a decent human being."

Which is to a large extent, true. He is the most eccentric of all of them :heart:
That reminds me of Ernst Junger.

An excellent man and WWI vet.

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